Tag Archive | Workforce

Podcast: Future U.S. Workforce for GEOINT

This got geoint? podcast features the recently published report on the “Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence,” released this week by the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Keith C. Clarke of the University of California, Santa Barbara, chair of the Committee on the Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence, joins us to discuss the main findings in the report, including why and how it was conducted, key trends emerging in the industry, current and anticipated expertise gaps, and current training programs.

To listen to the podcast, click Podcast: Future U.S. Workforce for GEOINT. To download a copy of the PDF report, click here.


New NRC Report: Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence

Mapping Sciences Committee, National Research Council Preview Report Release, Jan 2013

Committee on the Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence; Board on Earth Sciences and Resources; Board on Higher Education and Workforce; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

Abstract: We live in a changing world with multiple and evolving threats to national security, including terrorism, asymmetrical warfare (conflicts between agents with different military powers or tactics), and social unrest. Visually depicting and assessing these threats using imagery and other geographically-referenced information is the mission of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). As the nature of the threat evolves, so do the tools, knowledge, and skills needed to respond. The challenge for NGA is to maintain a workforce that can deal with evolving threats to national security, ongoing scientific and technological advances, and changing skills and expectations of workers.

Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence assesses the supply of expertise in 10 geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) fields, including 5 traditional areas (geodesy and geophysics, photogrammetry, remote sensing, cartographic science, and geographic information systems and geospatial analysis) and 5 emerging areas that could improve geospatial intelligence (GEOINT fusion, crowdsourcing, human geography, visual analytics, and forecasting). The report also identifies gaps in expertise relative to NGA’s needs and suggests ways to ensure an adequate supply of geospatial intelligence expertise over the next 20 years.

To download a PDF copy of the report, visit Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence.

Senate Passes COMPETES Act by Unanimous Consent

Today, the United States Senate passed an amended version of H.R. 5116, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 by Unanimous Consent. The legislation will need House approval.

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Chairman John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV released this statement following Senate passage of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010: “This is an investment in America’s future and our long-term competitiveness in the global marketplace. This bill invests in R&D and in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education – drivers of our economy and keys to our economic success. The investments we make now in science, technology, research and STEM education will pay incredible dividends down the road. The original COMPETES Act was a response to the National Academies’ Rising Above The Gathering Storm, which warned that America’s place as a global leader in science and technology was at risk. The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 will focus on three primary areas of importance to increase American innovation and competitiveness: (1) increasing science and research investments, (2) strengthening science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education, and (3) developing an innovation infrastructure.”

For more information, please visit the Senate Commerce Committee‘s website.

House Committee on Science and Technology Chairman Bart Gordon (D-TN) offered the following statement: “The Reauthorization passed committee on April 28 with bipartisan support, it passed the House on May 26th with bipartisan support, and now, the Senate has weighed in and approved it—unanimously. While there have been concessions made, the Senate’s amendments preserve the intent of the Rising Above the Gathering Storm report and the original COMPETES. It keeps our basic research agencies on a doubling path, it continues to invest in high-risk, high-reward energy technology development, it will help improve STEM education, and it will help unleash American innovation. I am hopeful that this will come up before the House next week. I urge my House colleagues to stand with the business community, the academic community, the scientific community, and the Senate to send a strong message that the U.S. must maintain its scientific and economic leadership. I cannot think of anything I would rather do as one of my final acts in Congress than sending this bill, with strong bipartisan support, to the president’s desk.”

For more information, please visit the House Science and Technology Committee’s website.

Developing the Geospatial Workforce

Do we have a sufficient geospatial workforce to meet national needs and spur innovation? Several efforts by the National Geospatial Advisory Committee, NRC Mapping Science Committee, ASPRS, Association of American Geographers, and others are exploring this issue.

National Geospatial Advisory Committee – Workforce Development Subcommittee

National Research Council Ongoing Studies and Reports


  • The National Research Council (NRC) will be conducting a study on the future U.S. workforce for geospatial intelligence.  An ad hoc committee will examine the need for geospatial intelligence expertise in the United States compared with the production of experts in the relevant disciplines, and discuss possible ways to ensure adequate availability of the needed expertise.

Geospatial Occupations

Geographic Information Science and Technology Body of Knowledge

  • DiBiase, D. DeMers, M., Johnson, A., Kemp, K., Luck, A.T., Plewe, B. and E. Wentz (eds.) 2006. Geographic Information Science and Technology Body of Knowledge. First Edition. Published by the Association of American Geographers and the UCGIS. Washington DC. 162pp.




Additional Resources

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