Tag Archive | Ushahidi

Seeing through the Crowds: Crowdmaps Visualize User-Reported Data for Public Health

by Maged N. Kamel Boulos, Geoplace.com, July 9, 2012

Crowd-sensing and citizen reporting of incidents are becoming increasingly common, with applications ranging from air-quality monitoring to building a database of all the Automated External Defibrillators in a major city (www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_Releases/2011/12/myheartmap-challenge) to protest movements, political activism and citizen journalism, as witnessed in the 2011/2012 “Occupy Movement” and “Arab Spring” events.A comprehensive review of the main technologies and standards involved in this domain was published in the International Journal of Health Geographics in December 2011 (dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-072X-10-67). This article, however, focuses on the use of “crowdmaps” for visualizing crowdsourced data. Crowd-generated reports and other material often produce Big Data: large, continuous streams of data that pose major challenges when trying to visualize, understand and make sense of them, particularly when attempting to do so in real time. This article presents several examples of crowdmaps, covering a diverse range of topics in which the spatiotemporal distribution (and content) of the corresponding crowdsourced data are displayed on a familiar, interactive (geographic) map interface.
For full text of the article, visit Seeing through the Crowds: Crowdmaps Visualize User-Reported Data | Articles – Publishing Titles | GeoPlace.

Mobile Technologies for Conflict Management | iRevolution

by Patrick Meier, iRevolution Blog, June 9, 2011

“Mobile Technologies for Conflict Management: Online Dispute Resolution, Governance, Participation” is the title of a new book edited by Marta Poblet. … The chapters are is divided into 3 sections: Disruptive Applications of Mobile Technologies; Towards a Mobile ODR; and Mobile Technologies: New Challenges for Governance, Privacy and Security. …

For full text of the blog, visit Mobile Technologies for Conflict Management | iRevolution.

Crisis Mapping with GIS: A Game Changer

by Nigel Waters, GeoWorld, May 13, 2011

Nigel Waters, editor of Cartographica, is a professor of geography and director for the Center of Excellence for Geographic Information Science, George Mason University; e-mail: nwaters@gmu.edu.

You may have missed it, but on Dec. 22, 1989, the 1990s were designated by the United Nations General Assembly as the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction (IDNDR). The objective was to mitigate by coordinated international cooperation “the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption caused by natural disasters such as earthquakes, windstorms, tsunamis, floods, landslides, volcanic eruptions, wildfires … and other calamities of natural origin.” (See http://www.undemocracy.com/A-RES-44-236.pdf.)

GIS’ Promise, IDNDR’s Failure

At the start of the 1990s, many believed that GIS might help in the task of natural-disaster reduction. There was the obvious potential to use GIS to alleviate the impact of disasters due to human agency. …

For full text of the article, visit Crisis Mapping with GIS: A Game Changer | Articles – Publishing Titles | GeoPlace.

Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism

by Nancy Scola, Tech President, June 3, 2011 – 4:35pm

Every time something happens in the world these days, somebody makes a map about it.We saw it with last January’s devastating earthquake in Haiti, the rollout of the U.S.’s long-awaited National Broadband Map in February, the personalized maps that accompanied April’s iPhone tracking story. We see it every election. And with the increasing availability of free and open-source or simply cheap mapping tools, and the growing footprint of the open data movement, democratized mapping is likely only getting started. …

via Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism | techPresident.

PBS Video: Crisis mappers: Mobile technology helps disaster victims worldwide

PBS, May 13, 2011

There are now 6.8 billion people on the planet. And about 5 billion cell phones. This extraordinary ability to connect has turned a modern convenience into a lifeline through a system called crisis mapping. It first gained prominence after the earthquake in Haiti, when people used their cell phones to send text messages to a centralized response team. Since then, crisis mapping has been used to help victims in emergency zones following the tornadoes in the Midwest, the earthquake in Japan and the unrest in the Middle East. Today, there are hundreds of volunteers in more than 50 countries creating maps of crises around the world, using a system that incorporates the lessons learned in Haiti. Alison Stewart reports on this worldwide network of volunteers – regular people — using a breakthrough technology to help others.

For link to video, visit Video: Crisis mappers: Mobile technology helps disaster victims worldwide | Need to Know.

The World’s Top 10 Gov 2.0 Initiatives

The World’s Top 10 Gov 2.0 Initiatives

By Darren Sharp, Shareable: Science & Tech01.19.11

The Gov 2.0 movement continues to gain momentum around the world with a number of inspiring people, projects & ideas rising to prominence over the last year or so. Sometimes the most important innovations emerge from the periphery where creative citizens take a “do it first, ask for permission later” approach that can generate a wealth of benefits for the entire global community. So here’s [Darren Sharp’s] pick of the world’s best Gov 2.0 initiatives. What are your favorites?

via Shareable: The World’s Top 10 Gov 2.0 Initiatives.

Crisis Mapping Meets Check-in

Image representing Ushahidi as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

By David Talbot, MIT Technology Review, March 28, 2011

From Libya to Japan, a Web-reporting platform called Ushahidi has helped human rights workers and others document and make sense of fast-moving crises. The platform allows reports from cell phones and Web-connected devices to be collected and displayed on Web-based maps. Now Ushahidi is adding a concept borrowed from location-based social networking, as well as layers of private access—functionality that could make the service more efficient and useful in politically charged circumstances. …

For full text of the article, visit Crisis Mapping Meets Check-in – Technology Review.

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