Tag Archive | United States House of Representatives

House Technology and Innovation Subcommittee Hearing – Cloud Computing

Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation | 2318 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 | 09/21/2011 – 10:00am – 12:00pm

The Next IT Revolution?: Cloud Computing Opportunities and Challenges

Witnesses

  • Mr. Michael Capellas, Chairman and CEO, Virtual Computing Environment Company
  • Dr. Dan Reed, Corporate Vice President, Technology Policy Group, Microsoft Corporation
  • Mr. Nick Combs, Federal Chief Technology Officer, EMC Corporation
  • Dr. David McClure, Associate Administrator, Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies, General Services Administration

via Technology and Innovation Subcommittee Hearing – Cloud Computing | Committee on Science – U.S. House of Representatives.

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Federal Research and Development in the FY 2011 Budget Compromise

On Monday, April 11, the U.S. House of Representatives introduced the bill to fund the federal government for the last half of FY 2011. This bill will be taken up in the House on April 13th and in the Senate on April 14th, and then sent to the President for his signature, hopefully before the midnight deadline on Friday, April 15th. If passed, non-defense funding levels will be reduced by a 0.2 percent across-the-board cut to achieve savings of approximately $1.1 billion. Specific details on programmatic cuts for Federal R&D can be found in the articles blow:

Text of the Legislation:

A summary of the legislation:

 

R&D in the FY 2011 Compromise

by Patrick Clemins, Ph.D., AAAS R&D Budget and Policy Program, April 13, 2011

Congress released their year-long continuing resolution for FY 2011 this morning which contains a total of around $38.5 billion in cuts, the largest collection of spending cuts in history. R&D intensive programs and agencies were spared the worst of the cuts. Basic research programs faired the best, while applied research programs, especially at the Department of Energy did less well, accurately reflecting the current policy debates taking place. Basic research generally has broad, bi-partisan support, but there is discussion as to how much the federal government should be involved in applied research and the role of industry in funding the applied research stage of the innovation pipeline.

For full text of the article and other related resources, visit: http://www.aaas.org/spp/rd/

 

FYI #48: Details of Final FY 2011 Appropriations Bill Emerging

By Richard Jones, American Institute of Physics

Total FY 2011 funding will be $78.5 billion less than that requested by the Obama Administration. … A release from the Senate Appropriations Committee states, “as these cuts must be implemented in just the remaining six months of the fiscal year, their impact will be especially painful in some instances.” The below figures, provided by the House Appropriations Committee, do not include the 0.2 percent across the board cut that was made to all non-defense accounts.  In all instances, reductions from current FY 2010 levels are shown, and the numbers are rounded.  It should also be noted that the House Appropriations statement explains: “This list contains highlighted program cuts. This list is not comprehensive of all program funding levels in the legislation.”

National Science Foundation
Research and Related Activities: Down $43 million
Education and Human Resources: Down $10 million

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Education: Down $38 million
Cross Agency Support: Down $83 million

U.S. Geological Survey: Down $26 million

For full text of the article, visit: http://www.aip.org/fyi/2011/048.html

House Republicans Propose New FY 2011 S&T Budgets

FYI#15, API Bulletin of Science Policy News, Richard Jones, February 10, 2011

Next week the House of Representatives may vote on a funding bill that would make significant changes in some S&T agency budgets. Under an initial version of this bill:

* The budget for the Department of Energy’s Office of Science would be reduced by 18.0 percent or $882.3 million from the current level.

* Funding for the National Institute of Standards and Technology would be cut by 14.4 percent or $123.7 million.

* NASA’s budget would remain essentially level, declining 0.6 percent or $103 million.

* The budget for the U.S. Geological Survey would also remain level, declining 0.5 percent or $5.3 million.

* The National Science Foundation’s budget would increase 6.0 percent or $412.9 million.

These changes were in a list of seventy proposed budget recommendations released yesterday by the House Appropriations Committee that were projected to total $74 billion. Additional budget cuts will be made in the bill before it goes to the full House. Chairman Rogers just announced that these cuts will total $100 billion from what President Obama requested. That forthcoming bill – a continuing resolution or CR – would provide funding after an existing short-term bill expires on March 4.

via House Republicans Propose New FY 2011 S&T Budgets.

New Chairman of the House Science and Technology Committee

Ralph Hall

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Ralph Hall Will Chair House Science and Technology Committee

The chairs of key committees in the House of Representatives with jurisdiction over science policy and budgets will change when the new Congress convenes on January 5, 2011. Among those changes are the leadership of the House Science and Technology Committee, and the House Appropriations Committee and its subcommittees. … The new Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee will be Hal Rogers (R-KY). … The House Science and Technology Committee will be chaired by Ralph Hall (R-TX). …

For full text of the article, click here.

Source: Richard M. Jones, FYI: The AIP for Science Policy News, December 15, 2010

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