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The National Map Users Conference and the Geospatial Information Science Workshop – Call for Abstracts Extended to Feb 6, 2011 — Federal Geographic Data Committee

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The National Map Users Conference and the Geospatial Information Science Workshop

The U.S. Geological Survey has issued a Call for Abstracts to support The National Map (TNM) Users Conference, and the Geographic Information Science Workshop to be held May 10-13, 2011 in Lakewood, Colo. This inaugural event will assemble a wide range of participants including scientists, managers and geospatial professionals from government, industry, academia and other organizations. A goal of TNM UC is to share accomplishments and progress, acknowledge best practices, and exchange innovative ideas concerning The National Map in supporting science initiatives. The role of the GIS Workshop will be learning specific techniques for using GIS in support of science. Interactive dialog will be encouraged through panel and lightning sessions, poster presentations, workshops, and demonstrations.

More information and abstract submission: http://nationalmap.gov/uc

For full text via The National Map Users Conference and the Geospatial Information Science Workshop – Call for Abstracts Extended to Feb 6, 2011 — Federal Geographic Data Committee.

Getting to Know the Mapping Science Committee of the National Research Council

Getting to Know the Mapping Science Committee

by Keith Clarke, Chair, Mapping Sciences Committee, the National Research Council

Important to the GIScience research community and agenda, especially as far as the federal government is concerned, is the Mapping Sciences Committee (MSC), a standing committee of the Board on Earth Science Resources of the National Research Council. What is this committee; where did it come from; what are its activities and responsibilities; and how do they impact the world of geographic information science, especially with regard to research and development? In this essay, the current MSC chair attempts to answer these questions and reveal MSC as a unique and important vehicle for advancing the science relating to geographic information in the United States.

For full text of the article, click here.

Source: ESRI ArcNews, Fall 2010

 

See also the following websites for more information:

Recent Mapping Related Reports

  • Geodesy is the science of accurately measuring Earth’s shape, orientation in space, and gravity field, and changes in these parameters over time. Geodetic techniques and instrumentation have enabled scientists to determine the changing position of any point on Earth with centimeter accuracy or better. They also provide the underpinnings for surveying and navigation, determining flood maps, measuring sea level rise, assessing groundwate… More >>
  • Mapping the Zone: Improving Flood Map Accuracy (2009) Flooding is the leading cause of natural disaster in the United States. High-quality, digital mapping is essential to communicating flood hazards to those at risk, setting appropriate insurance rates, and regulating development in flood-prone areas. As the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) nears the end of its Map Modernization Program, the agency, along with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, asked the Nationa… More >> Report in Brief
  • National Land Parcel Data: A Vision for the Future (2007) Land parcel data (also known as cadastral data) provides geographically-referenced information about the rights, interests, and ownership of land and are an important part of the financial, legal and real estate systems of society. The data are used by governments to make decisions about land development, business activities, regulatory compliance, emergency response, and law enforcement. In 1980, a National Research Council report called fo… More >> Report in Brief
  • A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science at the United States Geological Survey (2007) Comprehensive and authoritative baseline geospatial data content is crucial to the nation and to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS founded its Center of Excellence for Geospatial Information Science (CEGIS) in 2006 to develop and distribute national geospatial data assets in a fast-moving information technology environment. In order to fulfill this mission, the USGS asked the National Research Council to assess current GIScienc… More >>
  • Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management (2007) In the past few years the United States has experienced a series of disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005, which have severely taxed and in many cases overwhelmed responding agencies. In all aspects of emergency management, geospatial data and tools have the potential to help save lives, limit damage, and reduce the costs of dealing with emergencies. Great strides have been made in the past four decades in the development of geospatia… More >>
  • Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping* (2007) Floodplain maps serve as the basis for determining whether homes or buildings require flood insurance under the National Flood Insurance Program run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Approximately $650 billion in insured assets are now covered under the program. Under a funded mandate from Congress, FEMA is modernizing floodplain maps to better serve the program. However, concerns have been raised to Congress as to the adequac… More >>
  • Beyond Mapping: Meeting National Needs Through Enhanced Geographic Information Science (2006) Geographic information systems (GIS), the Global Positioning System (GPS), remote sensing, and other information technologies have all changed the nature of work in the mapping sciences and in the professions, industries, and institutions that depend on them for basic research and education. Today, geographic information systems have become central to the ways thousands of government agencies, private companies, and not-for-profit organization… More >>

NASA Authorization Act of 2010

Obama Signs NASA Reauthorization

President Signs the NASA Authorization bill, October 11, 2010. Credit: NASA photo courtesy of Pete Souza

President Obama Signs NASA Authorization Bill

Source: Space News, October 11, 2010. WASHINGTON — U.S. President Barack Obama on Oct. 11 signed into law a three-year NASA authorization bill that sets a new course for American human spaceflight. Hours before Obama put his signature on the NASA Authorization Act of 2010 (S. 3729) top NASA officials and U.S. lawmakers told reporters they welcomed the bill’s enactment but warned partisan pushback could threaten funding for the $58 billion measure when Congress reconvenes following mid-term elections in November. … For full text of this article, click here.

Winners and losers from NASA Authorization Act

Source: Nature, September 30, 2010.Like any federal agency, NASA is subject to the whims of Congress, which funds its activities. And following the passage of the NASA Authorization Act of 2010 on 29 September, the agency’s priorities have been reshaped.  … For full text of this article, click here.

House Gives Final Approval to NASA Authorization Act

Source: Space News, September 30, 2010. NEW YORK and WASHINGTON — The U.S. Congress passed a NASA authorization bill late Sept. 29, paving the way for an extra space shuttle flight next year and a new human spaceflight plan that takes aim at missions to an asteroid and Mars. … For full text of this article, click here.

Reaction to the House Vote

Source: Space Politics, September 30, 2010. The final recorded vote for S.3729 in the House last night is available. … For full text of this article, click here.

NASA Legisltiave Affairs Website

 

S. 3729 Title VIIEarth Science

SEC. 701. SENSE OF CONGRESS.It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) Earth observations are critical to scientific understanding and monitoring of the Earth system, to protecting human health and property, to growing the economy of the United States, and to strengthening the national security and international posture of the United States. Additionally, recognizing the number of relevant participants and activities involved with Earth observations within the United States Government and internationally, Congress supports the strengthening of collaboration across these areas;

(2) NASA plays a critical role through its ability to provide data on solar output, sea level rise, at mospheric and ocean temperature, ozone depletion, air pollution, and observation of human and environment relationships;

(3) programs should utilize open standards consistent with international data-sharing principles and obtain and convert data from other government agencies, including data from the United States Geological Survey, and data derived from satellites operated by NOAA as well as from international satellites are important to the study of climate science and such cooperative relationships and programs should be maintained;

(4) Earth-observing satellites and sustained monitoring programs will continue to play a vital role in climate science, environmental understanding, mitigation of destructive environmental impacts, and contributing to the general national welfare; and (5) land remote sensing observation plays a critical role in Earth science, and the national space policy supports this role by requiring operational land remote sensing capabilities.

SEC. 702. INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION IMPLEMENTATION APPROACH.

The Director of OSTP shall establish a mechanism to ensure greater coordination of the research, operations, and activities relating to civilian Earth observation of  those Agencies, including NASA, that have active programs that either contribute directly or indirectly to these areas. This mechanism should include the development of a strategic implementation plan that is updated at least every 3 years, and includes a process for external independent advisory input. This plan should include a description of the responsibilities of the various Agency roles in Earth observations, recommended cost-sharing and procurement arrangements between Agencies and other entities, including international arrangements, and a plan for ensuring the provision of sustained, long term space-basedclimate observations. The Director shall provide a report to Congress within 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act on the implementation plan for this mechanism.

SEC. 703. TRANSITIONING EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS.

The Administrator shall coordinate with the Administrator of NOAA and the Director of the United States Geological Survey to establish a formal mechanism that plans, coordinates, and supports the transitioning of NASA research findings, assets, and capabilities to NOAA operations and United States Geological Survey operations. In defining this mechanism, NASA should consider the establishment of a formal or informal Interagency Transition Office. The Administrator of NASA shall provide an implementation plan for this mechanism to Congress within 90 days after the date of enactment of this 23 Act. 68

SEC. 704. DECADAL SURVEY MISSIONS IMPLEMENTATION FOR EARTH OBSERVATION.

The Administrator shall undertake to implement, as appropriate, missions identified in the National Research Council’s Earth Science Decadal Survey within the scope of the funds authorized for the Earth Science Mission Directorate.

SEC. 705. EXPANSION OF EARTH SCIENCE APPLICATIONS.

It is the sense of the Congress that the role of NASA in Earth Science applications shall be expanded with other departments and agencies of the Federal government, State and local governments, tribal governments, academia, the private sector, nonprofit organizations, and international partners. NASA’s Earth science data can in creasingly aid efforts to improve the human condition and provide greater security.

See also: http://science.house.gov/press/PRArticle.aspx?NewsID=2921

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