Tag Archive | United States Department of Defense

Pentagon Lists 110 Potential Drone Bases in U.S.

by Steven Aftergood, Secrecy News, June 14th, 2012

The Department of Defense has identified 110 sites in the United States that could serve as bases for military unmanned aerial systems (UAS), or drones. A new report to Congress lists each of the 110 sites “and the UAS likely to fly at that location.” See “Report to Congress on Future Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training, Operations, and Sustainability,” Department of Defense, April 2012 (pp. 9-12).

For full text of the article, visit Secrecy News.

Senate: Drones Need to Operate “Freely and Routinely” In U.S.

by Steven Aftergood, Secrecy News, une 8th, 2012

The integration of drones or unmanned aerial systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) needs to be expedited, the Senate Armed Services Committee said in its report on the FY2013 defense authorization bill last week. … A provision of the bill would encourage greater collaboration on drone integration among the Department of Defense, the Federal Aviation Administration, and NASA. “Large number of UASs now deployed overseas may be returned to the United States as the conflict in Afghanistan and operations elsewhere wind down in coming years, and new UASs are under development.” “Without the ability to operate freely and routinely in the NAS, UAS development and training– and ultimately operational capabilities– will be severely impacted,” the Committee report said.

For full text of the article, visit: Senate: Drones Need to Operate “Freely and Routinely” In U.S. | Secrecy News.

White House touts ‘challenge’ prizes for tech solutions

by Dan Vergano, USA Today, April 10, 2012

And if the government dangles prize money in front of inventors to come up with technology solutions to common problems, it can get results just as in the private sector, suggests a White House report out today that documents its successes in offering “challenge” prizes. The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) report follows passage last year of the America COMPETES Act, which streamlined federal research funding rules, and gave agencies wider latitude to solve problems by offering competitive prizes. Prizes such as 2004′s Ansari X Prize, where philanthropists awarded $10 million to the first private spacecraft to reach 62 miles high twice in two weeks, helped inspire the move. …

For full text of the report, visit White House touts ‘challenge’ prizes for tech solutions – USATODAY.com.

White House ‘Big Data’ Push Means Big Bucks for Drone Brains

White House ‘Big Data’ Push Means Big Bucks for Drone Brains

By Robert Beckhusen, Danger Room, Wired Magazine, March 29, 2012

The military has a data problem. More specifically, it has a too-much-data problem. Analysts have to sort through massive amounts of information collected by orbiting surveillance drones and satellites, or finding the data trails left behind by spies inside defense networks. Sorting through all this data is also necessary for making unmanned vehicles more autonomous. Bring on the White House’s new “big data” research initiative. Announced this morning, the plan aims to invest “more than $200 million” in six government agencies to develop systems to “extract knowledge and insights from large and complex collections of digital data,” according to a White House statement. …

For full text of the article, via White House ‘Big Data’ Push Means Big Bucks for Drone Brains | Danger Room | Wired.com.

U.S. Defense Department Develops Map of Future Climate Chaos: Scientific American

By Lisa Friedman, Scientific American, March 19, 2012

University of Texas researchers have developed a sophisticated new mapping tool showing where vulnerability to climate change and violent conflicts intersects throughout the African continent. More than a year in the making and part of a $7.6 million, five-year Department of Defense grant, the Climate Change and African Political Stability project culls data on riots, civil unrest and other violent outbursts dating back to 1996. It overlaps with information about climate-change-induced vulnerabilities like drought, as well as the type of aid that is being delivered to various parts of Africa.

For full text of the article in Scientific American, visit U.S. Defense Department Develops Map of Future Climate Chaos: Scientific American.

Congressional Testimony on LightSquared Interference Issue

Artist Interpretation of GPS satellite, image ...

Image via Wikipedia

Space-Based Positioning Navigation and Timing (PNT) National Executive Committee, PNT Website, September 8, 2011

U.S. Government officials delivered the following testimony during a hearing of the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee, held September 8, 2011. The hearing focused on the scientific impacts of potential GPS interference from the terrestrial 4G network planned by LightSquared Subsidiary LLC.

For links to the testimony and video broadcast, visit Science Committee Testimony on LightSquared Interference Issue.

Place-Based Policies: Think “Where” First, Not Last

To kick off a new Initiative on Place-Based Public Management, the National Academy of Public Administration hosted a forum on Friday, May 20, 2011, to explore the potential that place-based policies and geospatial capabilities hold for improving public management. Speakers included:

  • Xavier Briggs, the primary author of the 2009 White House memo on Place-Based Policy and OMB Associate Director for General Government Services
  • Raphael Bostic, Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and Research, Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • Keith Barber, the lead for implementing DoD priorities for “whole of government” geospatial  capabilities, National Geospatial-Intelligence Administration
  • Michael Byrne, GIO, Federal Communications Commission, and lead for implementing the National Broadband Map
  • Jerry Johnston, GIO, Environmental Protection Agency, and geospatial lead for Data.gov
  • Mark Reichardt, President and CIO, Open Geospatial Consortium, a leading standards organization enabling place-based strategies

You can find more information about this initiative here.

R. Scott Fosler, who moderated the forum, summarized the key points of the discussion. First, Fosler stated, we must demonstrate “purposeful leadership.” We must identify the public purpose of geospatial technology implementation — economic development, environmental sustainability, community health, and security — at the outset. What are the expected outcomes and impacts for citizens? Second, Fosler noted that with respect to Place-Based Policies and related technologies, the Obama Administration is taking a demand-based approach, not a supply-based approach. Again, what is the impact, and how do we keep costs down? Third, Fosler asked, what are the processes and instruments that can be used to further develop and carry out place-based policies? “All these technologies are tools of management to be used in real-time and in real places,” he said. Lastly, Fosler stressed the importance of ongoing collaboration across boundaries, professions, governments, and sectors.

As we think about the future of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure, Jerry Johnston reiterated that we must focus on the public policy use cases first, not on the technology. Raphael Bostic emphasized that technology does not equal policy, and stressed the need for: 1) innovation and openness; 2) simplicity and ease of use; and 3) flexibility. He also listed several challenges that we must meet, including providing leadership on governance; creating community around placed-based policy making; lifting up applied uses; and developing “playbooks” from which communities can adopt solutions. Michael Byrne quipped, “think ‘where’ first, not last,” and then closed with an important point that federal data publication and consumption should be in a single vein.

The President’s Daily Map

The President’s Daily Map

Source: Christopher Tucker, Huffington Post, November 26, 2010

With the appointment of the new Director of National Intelligence (DNI) James R. Clapper, we have a unique opportunity to apply a new approach to conveying national security information to the Commander in Chief. DNI Clapper is often described as the father of Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT). In an earlier job, DNI Clapper coined the term Geospatial Intelligence, and even renamed and reorganized an intelligence agency around the concept. This was not to establish yet another intelligence “stovepipe”, but to provide an integrative framework for all intelligence and operational national security information. Under his watch, it became common to hear every speaker in the national security community say things like “All Actionable Intelligence Exists in Space and Time” — a truism that has become accepted wisdom by all national security professionals. The map became accepted as the common frame of reference for all national security knowledge.

For full text of the article, click here.

New National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Director Sees GEOINT App Store for Warfighter

New NGA Director Sees #GEOINT App Store for Warfighter

Letitia Long, the newly appointed director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), replacing Admiral Robert Murrett, spoke for the first time at the GEOINT conference today (read her prepared remarks from her keynote). Long has a lengthy resume in the intelligence community (IC) and was recommended by Jim Clapper, the director of national intelligence (DNI) for her new post. She articulated a vision for the agency based on needs she experienced while working as the second in command at the Defense Intelligence Agency.  …   For full text of the article, click here.

Source: Joe Francica, November 2, 2010, Directions Magazine

 

See also recent reports by the Mapping Science Committee, National Research Council of the National Academies:

New Research Directions for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (2010): The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) within the Department of Defense has the primary mission of providing timely, relevant, and accurate imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information–collectively known as geospatial intelligence (GEOINT)–in support of national security. In support of its mission, NGA sponsors research that builds the scientific foundation for geospatial intelligence and that reinforces the academic base, thus training the next generation of NGA analysts while developing new approaches to analytical problems. Historically, NGA has supported research in five core areas: (1) photogrammetry and geomatics, (2) remote sensing and imagery science, (3) geodesy and geophysics, (4) cartographic science, and (5) geographic information systems (GIS) and geospatial analysis. Positioning NGA for the future is the responsibility of the InnoVision Directorate, which analyzes intelligence trends, technological advances, and emerging customer and partner concepts to provide cutting-edge technology and process solutions. At the request of InnoVision, the National Research Council (NRC) held a 3-day workshop to explore the evolution of the five core research areas and to identify emerging disciplines that may improve the quality of geospatial intelligence over the next 15 years. This workshop report offers a potential research agenda that would expand NGA’s capabilities and improve its effectiveness in providing geospatial intelligence.

Priorities for GEOINT Research at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (2006) : The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence(GEOINT) to support national security, both as a national intelligence and a combatsupport agency. In the post-9/11 world, the need for faster and more accurate geospatialintelligence is increasing. GEOINT uses imagery and geospatial data and information toprovide knowledge for planning, decisions, and action. For example, data from satellites,pilotless aircraft and ground sensors are integrated with maps and other intelligence datato provide location information on a potential target. This report defines 12 hard problemsin geospatial science that NGA must resolve in order to evolve their capabilities to meetfuture needs. Many of the hard research problems are related to integration of datacollected from an ever-growing variety of sensors and non-spatial data sources, andanalysis of spatial data collected during a sequence of time (spatio-temporal data). Thereport also suggests promising approaches in geospatial science and related disciplinesfor meeting these challenges. The results of this study are intended to help NGA prioritizegeospatial science research directionsThe National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence(GEOINT) to support national security, both as a national intelligence and a combatsupport agency. In the post-9/11 world, the need for faster and more accurate geospatialintelligence is increasing. GEOINT uses imagery and geospatial data and information toprovide knowledge for planning, decisions, and action. For example, data from satellites,pilotless aircraft and ground sensors are integrated with maps and other intelligence datato provide location information on a potential target. This report defines 12 hard problemsin geospatial science that NGA must resolve in order to evolve their capabilities to meetfuture needs. Many of the hard research problems are related to integration of datacollected from an ever-growing variety of sensors and non-spatial data sources, andanalysis of spatial data collected during a sequence of time (spatio-temporal data). Thereport also suggests promising approaches in geospatial science and related disciplinesfor meeting these challenges. The results of this study are intended to help NGA prioritize geospatial science research directions.

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