Tag Archive | United Nations

How The United Nations Is Using Social Media To Spot Crises [Video]

“In this talk from PSFK CONFERENCE NYC, Robert Kirkpatrick talks about how the social media revolution has opened up a significant amount of data that can be analyzed (anonymously) to see signs of change. Kirkpatrick, together with his Global Pulse team at the United Nations, studies sentiment in Twitter feeds, fluctuations in price data and changes in other available information to look for trouble. By using data for good, the United Nations can respond to disaster rapidly — rather than after the fact.”

For full text of this article and a link to the video, visit How The United Nations Is Using Social Media To Spot Crises [Video] – PSFK.

How the UN want to use Big Data to spot crises

Posted by Timo Luge on Social Media 4 Good Blog, May 15, 2012

Robert Kirkpatrick from the UN’s Global Pulse team is talking about how United Nations agencies would like to use big data to search for crises in real-time. It’s a fascinating talk and Kirkpatrick shows how his team has been using data mining techniques to monitor bread prices in Latin America and rice prices in Indonesia. …Equally interesting is what he would like to do in the future: for example get information showing the streams of money being sent via mobile banking in developing countries. If the UN could see changes in behaviour, he argues, then they might be able to spot issues that are in the process of developing.

For a full text of the article and link to the video of Robert Kirkpatrick’s talk visit How the UN want to use Big Data to spot crises : Social Media 4 Good.

Predicting the Future of Global Geospatial Information Management

by Patrick Meier, iRevolution Blog, Posted on April 25, 2012

The United Nations Committee of Experts on Global Information Management (GGIM) recently organized a meeting of thought-leaders and visionaries in the geo-spatial world to identify the future of this space over the next 5-10 years. These experts came up with some 80+ individual predictions.

For a summary of this report, visit Predicting the Future of Global Geospatial Information Management | iRevolution. The full set of predictions on the future of global geospatial information management is available here as a PDF.

Haiti Earthquake a Year Later What Has Space Learned

Guest Blog: Haiti Earthquake a Year Later: What Has Space Learned?

Adriane Cornell, Space News, January 12, 2011

… After a disaster strikes, current practice ideally has it that the affected country requests aid from the United Nations, and the International Charter Space and Major Disasters is then activated. Space derived data is collected from organizations that are part of the Charter and this information is sent to other organizations who then produce maps and informational reports on the disaster. These organizations then send their information to the disaster responders and the international community. The United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER) tries throughout the process to support the complicated information exchange. …

For full text of this article, visit Guest Blog Haiti Earthquake a Year Later What Has Space Learned | SpaceNews.com.

World Bank – Google Partnership for Community Mapping Raises Data Access Questions

From Google’s Lat Long blog post: “Under this agreement, the World Bank will act as a conduit to make Google Map Maker source data more widely and easily available to government organizations in the event of major disasters, and also for improved planning, management, and monitoring of public services provision. …”

In an All Points Blog post on Directions Magazine (January 16, 2012), Adena Schutzberg notes that “World Bank partner organizations, which include government and United Nations agencies, will be able to contact World Bank offices for possible access to the Google Map Maker data for their various projects. … The data is Google’s. It’s not open to the world under a free data license like OpenStreetMap is. Google makes its data tiles available via its APIs (with have their own restrictions and sometimes, fees). The Map Maker data is not open source (because that license is for software). Oh, and Google’s mapping APIs are not open source either!”

Ms. Schutzberg also raises several good questions that will need to be addressed, including “… how the World Bank will decide if a requester can have access to the data. Is it only during an emergency? Or when one is expected? Or is for long-term planning for such emergencies? … under what sort of terms (license) Google/The World Bank will hand over the data? Will it be sharable to NGOs? To citizens? …”

For full text of Adena Schutzberg’s blog post, visit Google Gives World Bank Map Maker Data Distribution Privileges – All Points Blog.

Global Geospatial Group to Promote Equitable Data Access

by Gozde Zorlu, SciDev.Net, August 18, 2011

A high-level global group promoting geospatial information could help developing countries gain better access to data to help tackle issues such as climate change, conservation and disaster management. The UN has set up an expert committee and a programme on global geospatial information management under its Economic and Social Council to encourage international cooperation and establish best practice on the use of geographic data, collected by technologies such as remote sensing and the global positioning system (GPS). The decision, announced last month (27 July), was triggered by a report earlier this year by the UN secretary-general that concluded that many developing countries have a “serious lack of institutional capacity to harness the enormous potential of geospatial information technologies and to build a sustainable national infrastructure”.

For full text of the article, click here.

GIS Enables the Humanitarian Response: A Perspective from the United Nations

By Craig Williams, John Marinos, UN OCHA, Directions Magazine, September 22, 2011

Summary: Managing information during a humanitarian emergency is a crucial part of any relief operation. Geospatial information is central to the United Nations’ efforts, from early warning to emergency preparedness to emergency response. Craig Williams and John Marinos, both with the UN OCHA Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, describe the people and resources needed to manage in a crisis.

For full text of the article, visit: GIS Enables the Humanitarian Response: A Perspective from the United Nations – Directions Magazine.

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