Tag Archive | Tribal

JCOM Special Issue on Citizen Science

Dear all,

We are pleased to announce publication of the first issue of JCOM for 2016.


SPECIAL ISSUE: CITIZEN SCIENCE, PART I

We are delighted to publish the first in a two part series exploring Citizen Science. Following a call for papers, Bruce Lewenstein and Emma Weitkamp received 37 manuscripts. Following review, it was clear that we would need two issues to accommodate the many worthy submissions. This newsletter introduces the essays and research papers that form part one of the Special Issue. April will see the publication of part two, and the final papers accepted through the call. We thank all the authors submitting manuscripts and the many reviewers contributing their time to peer review papers.


EDITORIAL

Can we understand citizen science?
Bruce V. Lewenstein

Citizen science is one of the most dramatic developments in science communication in the last generation. But analyses of citizen science, of what it means for science and especially for science communication, have just begun to appear. Articles in this first of two special issues of JCOM address three intertwined concerns in this emerging field: The motivation of citizen science participants, the relationship of citizen science with education, and the implications of participation for creation of democratic engagement in science-linked issues. Ultimately these articles contribute to answering the core question: What does citizen science mean?


ARTICLES AND ESSAYS
Read More…

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National Ocean Policy and Marine Spatial Planning

Obama Administration officials released the Final Recommendations of the Ocean Policy Task Force on July 19, 2010, which would establish a National Policy for the Stewardship of the Ocean, Coasts, and Great Lakes (National Policy) and create a National Ocean Council (NOC) to strengthen ocean governance and coordination.  The Final Recommendations prioritize actions for the NOC to pursue, and call for a flexible framework for coastal and marine spatial planning to address conservation, economic activity, user conflict, and sustainable use of the ocean, our coasts and the Great Lakes. 

The NOC would coordinate across the Federal Government to implement the National Policy.  The Final Recommendations also call for the establishment of a Governance Coordinating Committee to formally engage with state, tribal, and local authorities.  The Final Recommendations are expected to be adopted into an Executive Order by President Obama.

President Obama recognized that our uses of the ocean are expanding at a rate that challenges our ability to manage significant and often competing demands,” said Nancy Sutley, Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality.  “With a growing number of recreational, scientific, energy, and security activities, we need a national policy that sets the United States on a new path for the conservation and sustainable use of these critical natural resources.”

On June 12, 2009, President Obama sent a memorandum to the heads of executive departments and Federal agencies establishing an Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force, led by the White House Council on Environmental Quality. The Task Force is charged with developing a recommendation for a national policy that ensures protection, maintenance, and restoration of oceans, our coasts and the Great Lakes. It will also recommend a framework for improved stewardship, and effective coastal and marine spatial planning.

In June 2009, President Obama created the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force and charged it with developing recommendations to enhance national stewardship of the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes and promote the long term conservation and use of these resources.  The Task Force was led by CEQ and included 24 senior-level policy officials from across the Federal Government.

At the President’s direction, the Task Force released an Interim Report in September 2009 and an Interim Framework for Effective Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning in December 2009.  Each of these reports was made available online for public comment.  The Task Force received and reviewed close to 5,000 written comments from Congress, stakeholders, and the public before finalizing its recommendations.  The Task Force’s Final Recommendations combine and update the proposals contained in the two earlier reports.

Source: Council on Environmental Quality, The Interagency Ocean Task Force, July 19, 2010.

First Nations Geospatial Workshop and Indignenous Mapping Network Conference

A few upcoming events:

FGDC & GeoConnections, Canada, hosting First Nations and Tribal Government Geospatial Workshop

The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), in collaboration with GeoConnections, Canada, and the U.S. Federal Geographic Data Committee,?will host the ?First Nations and Native Tribal Government Geographic Information System Workshop on Sunday, June 14, 2009 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Niagara Falls, NY. This workshop is a joint activity of U.S. and Canada to promote cross-border collaboration on spatial data infrastructure.

The workshop will demonstrate the benefits that spatial data infrastructures bring to land and resource management, enhance understanding of the application of geospatial technologies to matters of importance to Aboriginal communities, and provide a networking forum to encourage future cross-border collaborations between Aboriginal and Tribal communities and also with provincial, territorial, state and federal governments.

The workshop is being held in conjunction with the 2009 NCAI Mid Year Meeting, June 14-17, 2009.
http://www.fgdc.gov/site-events/NCAIworkshop

 

2009 Indigenous Mapping Network Conference, June 13-16, 2009.

Native American, Indigenous, Aboriginal, tribal attendees and supporters of mapping efforts on aboriginal territories – Welcome! Let’s learn, share, and grow together – find new ways of using mapping tools to solve sovereignty, environmental, and cultural issues.

Previous ideas resulting from this conference include supporting and training indigenous people who may have little experience with modern mapping technologies. Efforts also are made to keep abreast and inform the UN, governments, academics, and the technological world about traditional “mapping” technologies.

The Oneida Nation of Wisconsin welcomes conference attendees, speakers, and vendors to Green Bay, WI. We hope to not only provide an educational and fascinating conference for everyone, but also to share a brief look at Oneida culture and what life is like in Northeast Wisconsin.Registration, accommodation and agenda information follows.

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