Tag Archive | Text messaging

New CRS Report on Text Messaging, Section on Using SMS to Support Law Enforcement and Emergency Response

Seal of the United States Congressional Resear...

Image via Wikipedia

The Congressional Research Service issued a new report for Congress on Text and Multimedia Messaging on May 18, 2011. Page 12 of the report describes FEMA‘s new Emergency Response Alerting Network (PLAN) implementation plan.

Using SMS to Support Law Enforcement and Emergency Response

In May 2011, the FCC and FEMA announced the implementation of a Personal Localized Alerting Network (PLAN). This program was previously called the Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS), which has been under development since April 2008 under rules developed by the FCC. …

For full text of the article in PDF, visit FAS website here.

FEMA’s Personal Localized Alerting Network to Mobile Phones

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Image via Wikipedia

FEMA’s New Personal Localized Alerting Network (PLAN)

http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=54882

Release Date: May 10, 2011
Release Number: FNF-11-002

What is PLAN?

  • The Personal Localized Alerting Network (PLAN) is a new public safety system that allows customers who own an enabled mobile device to receive geographically-targeted, text-like messages alerting them of imminent threats to safety in their area.
  • This new technology ensures that emergency alerts will not get stuck in highly congested user areas, which can happen with standard mobile voice and texting services.  PLAN enables government officials to target emergency alerts to specific geographic areas through cell towers (e.g. lower Manhattan), which pushes the information to dedicated receives in PLAN-enabled mobile devices.
  • PLAN complements the existing Emergency Alert System, which is implemented by the FCC and FEMA at the federal level through broadcasters and other media service providers.  Like the Emergency Alert System, which is a modernization of the earlier Emergency Broadcast System (1963-1997), PLAN is intended to keep up with new technologies that can keep Americans safer.  This modern, integrated and complementary alert system provides significant public safety roles for broadcasters, cable service providers, wireless service providers and other service providers.
  • Wireless companies volunteer to participate in PLAN—technically called the Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS).  PLAN is the result of a unique public/private partnership between the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the wireless industry with the singular objective of enhanced public safety.
  • The Warning, Alert and Response Network (WARN) Act requires participating wireless carriers to activate PLAN technology by a deadline determined by the FCC, which is April 2012.  Participants that will offer PLAN ahead of schedule include AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon.

How Does It Work?

Read More…

The Power of GIS and SMS Alert Services

The Power of GIS and SMS Alert Services

Written by ASM_Admin, Asian Surveying & Mapping, Thursday, 23 December 2010 09:34

Communicating important messages can be triggered through geographic information systems (GIS) activities. Using mobile devices, short message service (SMS) occur as text messages and often originate automatically. Deteriorating weather forecasts, tsunami alerts, flood events and pollution impacts are examples of events that can be communicated to mobile devices to warn and inform people. These messages tend to be short and are intended to cause immediate action. Short message services are more commonly known as SMS messages. It was recently reported that over 2 Trillion of the these of these messages are sent through mobile devices around the globe daily, often forming part of the basic communication between two parties either close together or sometimes around the world. The advantages of SMS are speed, lower cost and easy-of-use. …

Full text of the article via The Power of GIS and SMS Alert Services.

%d bloggers like this: