Tag Archive | STEM

New NRC Report: Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence

Mapping Sciences Committee, National Research Council Preview Report Release, Jan 2013

Authors:
Committee on the Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence; Board on Earth Sciences and Resources; Board on Higher Education and Workforce; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

Abstract: We live in a changing world with multiple and evolving threats to national security, including terrorism, asymmetrical warfare (conflicts between agents with different military powers or tactics), and social unrest. Visually depicting and assessing these threats using imagery and other geographically-referenced information is the mission of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). As the nature of the threat evolves, so do the tools, knowledge, and skills needed to respond. The challenge for NGA is to maintain a workforce that can deal with evolving threats to national security, ongoing scientific and technological advances, and changing skills and expectations of workers.

Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence assesses the supply of expertise in 10 geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) fields, including 5 traditional areas (geodesy and geophysics, photogrammetry, remote sensing, cartographic science, and geographic information systems and geospatial analysis) and 5 emerging areas that could improve geospatial intelligence (GEOINT fusion, crowdsourcing, human geography, visual analytics, and forecasting). The report also identifies gaps in expertise relative to NGA’s needs and suggests ways to ensure an adequate supply of geospatial intelligence expertise over the next 20 years.

To download a PDF copy of the report, visit Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence.

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NSF Issues IGERT Solicitation Focused on Big Data

Logo of the National Science Foundation (NSF)....

Logo of the National Science Foundation (NSF). For NSF logo information visit: http://www.nsf.gov/policies/logos.jsp (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

by Erwin Gianchandi, the Computing Community Consortium blog, April 23, 2012

The National Science Foundation (NSF) last week issued a new solicitation under its Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) program, providing a specific track for training the next generation of researchers in computational and data-enabled science and engineering. The solicitation is part of the Foundation’s (and Administration’s) Big Data Initiative, which was announced last month.

According to the new solicitation (emphasis added):

“Building upon the IGERT platform, the purpose of this IGERT solicitation is to support new models in graduate education in which students are engaged in an environment that supports innovation to learn through hands-on experience how their own research may contribute in new ways to benefit society and to learn the processes for the successful implementation of such contributions.

Within the Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CIF21) and IGERT, NSF recognizes the need to educate and support a next generation of researchers able to address fundamental challenges in 1) core techniques and technologies for advancing big data science and engineering; 2) analyzing and dealing with challenging computational and data enabled science and engineering (CDS&E) problems, and 3) researching, providing, and using the cyberinfrastructure that makes cutting-edge CDS&E research possible in any and all disciplines.

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President’s FY13 Research and Development Budget Released

The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has responsibility, in partnership with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), for advising the President on the Federal Research and Development (R&D) budget and shaping R&D priorities across those Federal agencies that have significant portfolios in science and technology. OSTP also has responsibility—with the help of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), which is administered out of OSTP—for coordinating interagency research initiatives. It is OSTP’s mission to help develop and implement sound science and technology policies and budgets that reflect Administration priorities and make coordinated progress toward important national policy goal.

OSTP is pleased to release the following information on the science, technology, innovation, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education components of the President’s FY 2013 BudgetClick here for webcast of budget briefing and PDF of R&D Budget.

The full President’s FY 2013 budget can be found here.

Measuring the Impacts of Federal Investments in Research and Development

Measuring the Impacts of Federal Investments in Research: A Workshop

Monday-Tuesday, April 18-19, 2011

20 F Street (NW) Conference Center

Washington, D.C. 20001

A committee formed under the auspices of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) and Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP) is holding a two-day workshop to identify analytical and data needs and opportunities in assessing the returns to federal research funding across a wide range of fields and government missions.   The meeting is targeted for:

  • Federal agency research evaluators
  • Congressional staff with research jurisdictions
  • Science funding advocates
  • Science of science policy scholars
  • Other academics

Questions to be discussed include:

What have we learned from previous efforts to measure the economic and noneconomic benefits of federal research investments?

What are the links between health research and health outcomes and costs?

Can we measure the impact of research on non-market values such as climate change mitigation, food security, environmental protection, and national security?

What progress has been made in constructing a long-term data infrastructure for measuring research impacts? Can approaches such as STAR Metrics be broadened to encompass different performers and funding mechanisms?

What methods and metrics are being used in Europe, Latin America, and elsewhere?

What metrics and data are needed to track career choices and career development of STEM graduates trained with research funds?

How might we assess the influence of research on formal (e.g., regulatory, judicial) and informal (e.g., consumer, patient) decision-making?

For more information and to register for the workshop, via Returns on Federal R&D.

Congress passes America COMPETES Act

US Congress Passes Strategic Science Bill

After a dramatic rally of support in the US Senate on Friday, the bill found itself back in the House where it was briskly shepherded through to a final vote this afternoon. The bill now goes to President Barack Obama to be signed into law. … For full text of the article, click here.

Source: Eugene Samuel Reich, NatureNews, December 21, 2010; see also GovTrack, December 21, 2010, click here for vote breakdown.

Senate Passes COMPETES Act by Unanimous Consent

Today, the United States Senate passed an amended version of H.R. 5116, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 by Unanimous Consent. The legislation will need House approval.

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Chairman John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV released this statement following Senate passage of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010: “This is an investment in America’s future and our long-term competitiveness in the global marketplace. This bill invests in R&D and in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education – drivers of our economy and keys to our economic success. The investments we make now in science, technology, research and STEM education will pay incredible dividends down the road. The original COMPETES Act was a response to the National Academies’ Rising Above The Gathering Storm, which warned that America’s place as a global leader in science and technology was at risk. The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 will focus on three primary areas of importance to increase American innovation and competitiveness: (1) increasing science and research investments, (2) strengthening science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education, and (3) developing an innovation infrastructure.”

For more information, please visit the Senate Commerce Committee‘s website.

House Committee on Science and Technology Chairman Bart Gordon (D-TN) offered the following statement: “The Reauthorization passed committee on April 28 with bipartisan support, it passed the House on May 26th with bipartisan support, and now, the Senate has weighed in and approved it—unanimously. While there have been concessions made, the Senate’s amendments preserve the intent of the Rising Above the Gathering Storm report and the original COMPETES. It keeps our basic research agencies on a doubling path, it continues to invest in high-risk, high-reward energy technology development, it will help improve STEM education, and it will help unleash American innovation. I am hopeful that this will come up before the House next week. I urge my House colleagues to stand with the business community, the academic community, the scientific community, and the Senate to send a strong message that the U.S. must maintain its scientific and economic leadership. I cannot think of anything I would rather do as one of my final acts in Congress than sending this bill, with strong bipartisan support, to the president’s desk.”

For more information, please visit the House Science and Technology Committee’s website.

OSTP FY 2011 Budget Briefing

Office of Science & Technology Policy (OSTP) FY 2011 Budget Briefing

Date: February 1, 2010,  Time: 1:00pm to 2:00pm, AAAS Auditorium

Speakers:

  • John P. Holdren – Director and Assistant to the President for Science and Technology
  • Aneesh Chopra – Chief Technology Officer and Associate
  • Director, Technology Shere Abbott – OSTP Associate Director, Energy & Environment
  • Arden Bement – NSF Director
  • Jane Lubchenco – NOAA Administrator
  • Lori Garver – NASA Deputy Administrator

Briefing Memos can be found at: http://www.ostp.gov/cs/rd_budgets/fy_2009_budget/2011_budget

OMB President’s Budget for Fiscal Year 2011: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/

Agency FY 2011 Budget Briefing Schedule

The schedule of other agency FY 2011 budget briefings can be found at http://www.aaas.org/spp/rd/fy2011/

Stay on top of the FY 2011 budget process with Twitter updates from the AAAS R&D Budget and Policy Program: http://twitter.com/AAAS_RDBudget

Highlights:

  • “The Obama Administration’s FY2011 Budget calls for $66 billion investment in nondefense research and development (R&D) – an increase of $3.7 billion or 5.9 percent above the FY2010 enacted level – reflecting the Administration’s firm belief that investment in science, technology, and innovation is the key to building the American Economy of the future.”
  • “The President’s Budget maintains, as promised, a path to double the budgets of three key science agencies – the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) laboratories – by providing them a combined $13.3 billion, an increase of $824 million or 6.6 percent above the 2010 enacted total;”
  • “The Presiden’ts Budget provides almost $1 billion t the R&D budget of the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration – a substantial increase over 2010 – and also calls for $2.6 billion – an increase of $439 million or 21 percent – to multi-agency U.S. Global change Research Program (USGCRP), affirming the Administration’s commitment to understanding the risks posed by climate change and developing appropriate strategices to mitigate and adapt to those risks.”
  • “The President’s Budget provides $679 million for the Interior Department’s U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).”

 

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