Tag Archive | STAR-TIDES

Help Humanitarian Open Street Map Team Map Refugee Camps in Africa

REPOST OF ARTICLE “Imagery To the Crowd” by Joshua S. Cambell, Disruptive Geo Blog, May 21, 2012

Over the past year, the Humanitarian Information Unit (HIU) at the U.S. State Department has been working with the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) to publish current high-resolution commercial satellite imagery during humanitarian emergencies. The imagery is used to map the affected areas, and provide a common framework for governments and aid agencies to work from. All of the map data is stored in the OpenStreetMap database (http://osm.org), under a license that ensures the data is freely available and open for a range of uses.

This work began as part of the RELIEF Exercises 11-4 at Camp Roberts in August 2010, and focused primarily on the legal and policy issues associated with sharing imagery. Now with RELIEF Exercise 12-3 happening in DC this week, the project is moving into its first technical implementation. As a proof of concept, the HIU is publishing imagery for the refugee camps in the Horn of Africa, and making the imagery available to the volunteer mapping community. The goal is to produce detailed vector data for the refugee camps, including roads and footpaths in and around the camps. There are tens of thousands of refugees living in these camps who are victims of famine and conflict, and these data can be used to improve planning for humanitarian assistance.

How to help: We are going to open access to the imagery on Monday 21 May 2012. We would like to spend two 24-hour periods tracing the areas of interest, which will include 11 refugee sites. All work will be done through the HOT Tasking Manager (http://tasks.hotosm.org), a microtasking platform that will split up the image tracing into ‘tiles’ that will require approximately 30-45 minutes to map.

Accomplishing this task will require that volunteers become familiar with OpenStreetMap and the basic concepts of mapping. But, don’t worry, there are plenty of resources out there to help. For more information on the OpenStreetMap (OSM) process, see the “Beginning OpenStreetMap Tutorial” available from the LearnOSM website (http://learnOSM.org), specifically Chapters 1,2,3,6. For more information on HOT’s work in Somalia see the HOT Somalia project page, and other HOT related materials on the HOT wiki.

For full text of the article, visit Imagery to the crowd…phase 1 | Disruptive Geo.

To help the Humanitarian Open Street Map Team Map Refugee Camps in the Horn of Africa, visit the HOT OSM Task Manager: http://tasks.hotosm.org/

If you don’t have an HOT OSM account, you can register for one by clicking here.

Crowd and Crown: Social Media and Mapping for International Crisis Response

Crowd and Crown:Policy Issues in Social Media and Mapping

for International Crisis Response 

Crowdsourcing and crisis mapping have opened new approaches to making sense of crises. Yet these new technologies raise unanswered questions. When a refugee tweets her location with a request for help, is she still safe? How do we know that the content of the message is from a refugee at all? And do we have a responsibility to act on that request for aid? Developing policies that connect the crowd to the large, traditional institutions that respond to emergencies will require asking these questions and developing some initial (and imperfect) answers.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011
3:00-4:30pm

6th Floor Moynihan Board Room
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center
One Woodrow Wilson Plaza
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

This meeting is free and open to the public. Allow time for routine security procedures. A photo ID is required for entry.

The Woodrow Wilson Center is located in the Ronald Reagan Building (Federal Triangle stop on Blue/Orange Line, or down the street from Metro Center stop on the Red Line). Public parking is available underneath the Reagan Building; however we recommend metro or taxi. www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

About John Crowley, Research Fellow, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative John Crowley is a research fellow at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and an analyst (contract) with the STAR-TIDES initiative at the National Defense University. He was the lead author of the recent UN Foundation study, Disaster Relief 2.0. He also leads a community of software developers that convene at Camp Roberts to work on the difficult inter-organizational issues that emerge from crowdsourcing and crisis mapping. He holds degrees in public policy, history, and music from Harvard and Boston University, and was the 2008 Robert C. Seamans Fellow in Science, Technology, and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He tweets at @jcrowley.

The Wilson Center’s Science and Technology Innovation Program (STIP)focuses on emerging technologies and the critical choices innovation presents to public policy. Our work ranges from nanotechnology, geoengineering, and synthetic biology to serious games, participatory technology assessment, transformative social media, and geospatial technology.

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is the living, national memorial to President Wilson established by Congress in 1968 and headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Center establishes and maintains a neutral forum for free, open, and informed dialogue. It is a nonpartisan institution, supported by public and private funds and engaged in the study of national and international affairs.

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