Tag Archive | Spatial Law

Kevin Pomfret’s Top 10 Spatial Law and Policy Stories of 2011

Spatial Law and Policy: Top 10 Stories of 2011

by Kevin Pomfret, Spatial Law and Policy Blob, December 27, 2011

  • U.S. Supreme Court to address law enforcement’s use of tracking devices.
  • Impact of budget cuts becoming more pronounced
  • Privacy issues regarding geolocation becomes international story
  • Increased efforts to regulate Internet
  • Commercial use of drones becoming a reality
  • Lightsquared/GPS dispute
  • India revises its Remote Sensing Data Policy
  • Indonesia passes Geospatial Information Act
  • Big Data

For full text of Kevin’s article with a great discussion on each topic and useful links, visit Spatial Law and Policy: Spatial Law and Policy: Top 10 Stories of 2011.

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Hot Spatial Law and Policy Issues for the Coming Year

by Kevin Pomfret, Spatial Law and Policy, October 4, 2011

The next year is shaping up to be an important period for the geospatial industry. Over that time there is likely to be movement on a number of key legal and policy issues that could have a significant impact on the industry’s growth over the next decade. These issues include:

  • LightSquared/GPS dispute
  • GPS tracking case to be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court
  • Budget considerations
  • Impact of privacy legislation and regulation on geolocation
  • Efforts to use the UN to regulate information on the Internet

For full text of this nice review article, visit Spatial Law and Policy.

Mobile Devices, Location Technologies and Shifting Values

More Work To Be Done

by Kevin Pomfret, Spatial Law and Policy Blog, April 2, 2011

I recently attended two conferences related to location technology. The first, “Mobile Devices, Location Technologies and Shifting Values” was hosted by the Center on Law and Information Policy on March 25, 2011 at the Fordham Law School and focused on the legal and policy issues associated with location and mobile devices. The second, “Enterprise Strategies for Location Intelligence”, hosted by the wherebusiness.com on March 30-31, addressed the challenges businesses will face in trying to integrate location information into their enterprises.

Both of the events were well run and I learned a good deal. However, I was also struck by the disconnect between the issues the legal community seem to be focused on and the issues facing the business and technology community with respect to location technology.

For full text of the article, visit: Spatial Law and Policy.

Spatial Law and Policy: Government’s Use of Tracking Technology: More Than A Constitutional Issue?

Government’s Use of Tracking Technology: More Than A Constitutional Issue?

Kevin Pomfret, Spatial Law and Policy Blog, Friday, March 4, 2011

I have written in the past about a series of recent court cases in the United States involving the Fourth Amendment and a reasonable expectation of privacy from a location standpoint. … From a legal standpoint these cases raise some very difficult and important issues regarding both the Fourth Amendment and the clearly outdated Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA). I will not go into the details of either here, other than to say that courts are split in both types of cases as to whether a warrant is required before location data is collected or obtained. However, as equal importance as the legal analysis is that the public position of the Obama administration – through the Department of Justice – in each federal case appears to have been that a warrant is not required. …

For full text of the article, visit Spatial Law and Policy: Government’s Use of Tracking Technology: More Than A Constitutional Issue?.

Geospatial Law Webinar

Directions Media will be hosting a webinar on Geospatial Law on June 29 @ 2:00 p.m. Eastern. The topics will include data quality, licensing, privacy, intellectual property, etc. Featured panelists include Kevin Pomfret of LeClaire Ryan, Kara John of DMTI Spatial, and Pete Schreiber of ESRI. Details about registration can be found at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/260933274 (fee and registration required)

OGC Spatial Law and Policy Summit 2009

 

OGC Spatial Law and Policy Summit 2009

Posted  by GIS Talk on Sunday, August 09, 2009

The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) announces that it will hold a Spatial Law and Policy Summit at The Westin Washington, D.C. City Center on October 7, 2009. Professionals from the government and private sector whose work involves laws and policies related to geospatial technology are invited to register and attend. This unprecedented event will feature talks and panel discussions by experts familiar with the wide range of legal and policy issues associated with growth in consumer and business applications of geospatial systems, software and services. The growing use of Earth browsers, satellite navigation devices in cars and PDA’s, location-based services associated with cell phones, business intelligence, social networking and satellite tracking of vehicles and equipment raises a number of issues concerning privacy, intellectual property rights, liability, and national security. As the speakers will explain, in many cases, the existing legal and policy framework is inadequate to provide governments, businesses and consumers clear guidance on these issues. The Summit will be chaired by OGC director and Executive Committee member Kevin Pomfret, a Richmond, Virginia based attorney who has written and spoken extensively on spatial law and technology.

To learn more, visit the OGC Spatial Law and Policy Summit website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/event/091007ets

The OGC Forms a Spatial Law and Policy Committee

 

February 25, 2009, Wayland, Massachusetts. The Board of Directors of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC?) has chartered a committee of the Board to specifically address the “spatial law and policy issues” which will influence development requirements of the Consortium’s
technology process. The Spatial Law and Policy Committee (SLPC) will be chaired by OGC director and Executive Committee member, Kevin Pomfret, and will be organized under board leadership as an educational forum to include both select member and community
participation.

In the past, legal issues associated with spatial data and technology were primarily a concern for lawyers that worked with or for the government. Now, both public sector and private sector users and providers of geospatial data and technologies face a wide range of
legal issues associated with growth in consumer and business applications for spatial technology. Such applications include Earth browsers, satellite navigation devices in cars and PDA’s, location-based services associated with cell phones, business intelligence, social networking and satellite tracking of vehicles and equipment. All of these applications raise issues that involve intellectual property rights, liability, privacy, and national security. In many cases, the existing legal and policy framework is inadequate to provide governments, businesses and consumers clear guidance on these issues.

David Schell, OGC Chairman, said, “The OGC plays an expanding role in addressing society’s increasing dependence on geospatial information services. The advent of information interoperability in this technology domain raises the profile of geospatial information for
policy makers, managers and scientists around the world. The Board’s creation at this time of a Spatial Law and Policy Committee reflects the increasing need of leaders to understand the challenges they face in this area, and the Board’s commitment to meeting their related information requirements.”

Kevin Pomfret added, “I am looking forward to working with the OGC and its members on these important issues. Due in large part to their collective vision and hard work, spatial technology and applications using spatial data are increasingly being utilized in a wide range of important activities. In order for this growth to continue, a solid legal and policy framework must exist. The OGC’s Spatial Law and Policy Committee can play a critical role in the development of such a framework.”

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