Tag Archive | Social media

Tech experts exit White House – POLITICO.com

By Kim Hart and Michelle Quinn, Politico Pro, 7/8/11

When President Barack Obama took office, he brought with him a pack of technology advocates with impressive résumés and ambitious visions. They wanted to improve the government through the use of Internet tools and iPhone apps and help shape communications policy to expand broadband. But the core group of techies that launched big initiatives has left the White House over the past six months, raising questions about what will become of the administration’s technology-focused goals…The administration says its commitment to technology remains strong. …

For full text of the article, visit Tech experts exit White House – Kim Hart and Michelle Quinn – POLITICO.com.

Advertisements

The Publication of National Security Information in the Digital Age

The Publication of National Security Information in the Digital Age

By Mary-Rose Papandrea, Journal of National Security Law & Policy, June 26, 2011

In one of her speeches on Internet freedom, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said that “[t]he fact that WikiLeaks used the internet is not the reason we criticized its actions.” Although Clinton is correct that it is essential to separate the technology. … New technology has made it much easier to leak and otherwise disseminate national security information. At the same time, leaks continue to play an essential role in checking governmental power and often make invaluable contributions to our public debate. … One dominant theme in the discussion of how to strike the balance between an informed public and the need to protect legitimate national security secrets is whether new media entities like WikiLeaks are part of “the press” and whether Julian Assange and his cohorts are engaging in“journalism.” As the gathering and distribution of news and information becomes more widely dispersed, and the act of informing the public more participatory and collaborative, however, determining who is engaging in journalism and what constitutes the press has become increasingly difficult. It is not possible to draw lines based on the medium of communication, the journalistic background of the publisher, the editing process, the size of the audience, or the methods used to obtain the information.

For full text of the report, visit The Publication of National Security Information in the Digital Age | Journal of National Security Law & Policy.

The Legal Implications of Social Networking Part I

By David Navetta, Information Law Group, June 11, 2011

Summary:
Much like the “Cloud computing revolution” there is an almost frenzied excitement around social media, and many companies are stampeding to exploit social networking.  The promise of increased intimate customer interactions, input and loyalty, and enhanced sales and expanded market share can result in some organizations overlooking the thorny issues arising out of social networking.  Many of these issues are legal in nature and could increase the legal risk and liability potential of an organization employing a social media strategy.

In this multi-part series the InfoLawGroup will identify and explore the legal implications of social media. This series will help organizations begin to identify some of the legal risks associated with social media so that they may start addressing and mitigating these risks while maximizing their social media strategy.

In Part One of the series, we will provide a high level overview of the legal risks and issues associated with an organization’s use of social media. In subsequent parts members of the InfoLawGroup team will take a deeper dive into these matters, and provide some practical insight and strategic direction for addressing these issues.   As always, we view our series as the beginning of a broader conversation between ourselves and the larger community, and we welcome and strongly encourage comments, concerns, corrections and criticisms.

View the entire entry:
http://www.infolawgroup.com/2011/06/articles/social-networking/the-legal-implications-of-social-networking-the-basics-part-one/index.html

Crowd and Crown: Social Media and Mapping for International Crisis Response

Crowd and Crown:Policy Issues in Social Media and Mapping

for International Crisis Response 

Crowdsourcing and crisis mapping have opened new approaches to making sense of crises. Yet these new technologies raise unanswered questions. When a refugee tweets her location with a request for help, is she still safe? How do we know that the content of the message is from a refugee at all? And do we have a responsibility to act on that request for aid? Developing policies that connect the crowd to the large, traditional institutions that respond to emergencies will require asking these questions and developing some initial (and imperfect) answers.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011
3:00-4:30pm

6th Floor Moynihan Board Room
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center
One Woodrow Wilson Plaza
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

This meeting is free and open to the public. Allow time for routine security procedures. A photo ID is required for entry.

The Woodrow Wilson Center is located in the Ronald Reagan Building (Federal Triangle stop on Blue/Orange Line, or down the street from Metro Center stop on the Red Line). Public parking is available underneath the Reagan Building; however we recommend metro or taxi. www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

About John Crowley, Research Fellow, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative John Crowley is a research fellow at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and an analyst (contract) with the STAR-TIDES initiative at the National Defense University. He was the lead author of the recent UN Foundation study, Disaster Relief 2.0. He also leads a community of software developers that convene at Camp Roberts to work on the difficult inter-organizational issues that emerge from crowdsourcing and crisis mapping. He holds degrees in public policy, history, and music from Harvard and Boston University, and was the 2008 Robert C. Seamans Fellow in Science, Technology, and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He tweets at @jcrowley.

The Wilson Center’s Science and Technology Innovation Program (STIP)focuses on emerging technologies and the critical choices innovation presents to public policy. Our work ranges from nanotechnology, geoengineering, and synthetic biology to serious games, participatory technology assessment, transformative social media, and geospatial technology.

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is the living, national memorial to President Wilson established by Congress in 1968 and headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Center establishes and maintains a neutral forum for free, open, and informed dialogue. It is a nonpartisan institution, supported by public and private funds and engaged in the study of national and international affairs.

Maria Popova: In a new world of informational abundance, content curation is a new kind of authorship

Image representing Twitter as depicted in Crun...

Image via CrunchBase

By Maria Popova, Nieman Journalism Lab, Harvard University

Editor’s Note: Maria Popova is the editor of Brain Pickings, a curation of “cross-disciplinary interestingness” that scours the world of the web and beyond for share-worthy tidbits. Here, she considers how new approaches to curation are changing the way we consume and share information.

Last week, Megan Garber wrote an excellent piece on whether Twitter is speech or text. Yet despite a number of insightful and timely points, I’d argue there is a fundamental flaw with the very dichotomy of the question. While Twitter can certainly be both, it’s inherently neither. And trying to classify it within one or both of these conventional checkboxes completely misses the point that we might, in fact, have to invent an entirely new checkbox. …

via Maria Popova: In a new world of informational abundance, content curation is a new kind of authorship » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism.

Social Media and Emergency Management: Top 10 Questions

Kim Stephens provides a nice 101 on social media and its use for emergency management.

Post by: Kim Stephens, iDisaster 2.0, June 6, 2011

Warm weather seems to bring numerous conferences. After speaking to various groups I am reminded that there is a large contingent of people in response organizations that have heard of social media, but might not understand some of the basics. If you fall into that camp, this post is for you. I have outlined the top ten questions that I often hear, both through speaking and even through our Social Media and Emergency Management chats. …

For full text of the article, via Social Media and Emergency Management: Top 10 Questions | idisaster 2.0.

New CRS Report on Text Messaging, Section on Using SMS to Support Law Enforcement and Emergency Response

Seal of the United States Congressional Resear...

Image via Wikipedia

The Congressional Research Service issued a new report for Congress on Text and Multimedia Messaging on May 18, 2011. Page 12 of the report describes FEMA‘s new Emergency Response Alerting Network (PLAN) implementation plan.

Using SMS to Support Law Enforcement and Emergency Response

In May 2011, the FCC and FEMA announced the implementation of a Personal Localized Alerting Network (PLAN). This program was previously called the Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS), which has been under development since April 2008 under rules developed by the FCC. …

For full text of the article in PDF, visit FAS website here.

%d bloggers like this: