Tag Archive | Social media

GIS Enables the Humanitarian Response: A Perspective from the United Nations

By Craig Williams, John Marinos, UN OCHA, Directions Magazine, September 22, 2011

Summary: Managing information during a humanitarian emergency is a crucial part of any relief operation. Geospatial information is central to the United Nations’ efforts, from early warning to emergency preparedness to emergency response. Craig Williams and John Marinos, both with the UN OCHA Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, describe the people and resources needed to manage in a crisis.

For full text of the article, visit: GIS Enables the Humanitarian Response: A Perspective from the United Nations – Directions Magazine.

Tech@State: Data Visualization

The next Tech@State, scheduled for Sept 23-24, will feature new innovative and fascinating data visualization techniques. The event will also be streamed live on the Internet.

Agenda for Data Visualization

DAY 1:

8:00 AM – Doors Open

8:50 – 9:00 AM – Introduction, Suzanne Hall – Senior Advisor for Innovation, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs

9:00 – 9:15 AM – Welcome, Dr Kerri-Ann Jones, Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs

9:15 – 10:15 AM – Keynote Address – ‘Policy and Technology’ Edward Tufte

10:15 – 10:30 AM – Coffee Break

10:30 – 11:25 AM – Panel on ‘Development Challenge: Open Data to Making Sense of Data’

11:25 AM – 12:20 PM – Panel on ‘Latest Trends in Data Visualization’

12:20 – 12:30 PM – Showing of ‘Connected’ Trailer & Declaration of Interdependence Project

12:30 – 1:30 PM – Lunch

— Afternoon Breakouts —

1:30 – 3:00 PM

Session A

1.  Supporting Disaster Response and Coordination – Panelists Bios & Photos

2.  Visualizations for Aid Transparency and Management – Panelists Bios & Photos

3.  Best Practices for Visualization Interoperability – Panelist Bios & Photos

4.  State Department and USAID Data Visualization Projects – Panelist Bios & Photos

3:00 – 3:30 PM – Coffee Break

3:30 – 5:00 PM

Session B

1.  Using Climate and Health Data to Monitor Food Insecure Areas – Panelist Bios & Photos

2.  Mobile Technology and New Media:  Trends and Opportunities – Panelist Bios & Photos

3.  Turning Information into Insight – Panelist Bios & Photos

4.  New Ways to Visualize Development Data – Panelist Bios & Photos

 

 

Political Repression 2.0 – NYTimes.com

by Evgeny Morozov, NYT, September 1, 2011

AGENTS of the East German Stasi could only have dreamed of the sophisticated electronic equipment that powered Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s extensive spying apparatus, which the Libyan transitional government uncovered earlier this week. The monitoring of text messages, e-mails and online chats — no communications seemed beyond the reach of the eccentric colonel. What is even more surprising is where Colonel Qaddafi got his spying gear: software and technology companies from France, South Africa and other countries. … Amid the cheerleading over recent events in the Middle East, it’s easy to forget the more repressive uses of technology. …

For full text of the op-ed, visit Political Repression 2.0 – NYTimes.com.

Sifting Fact from Fiction: The Role of Social Media in Conflict

Live webcast from the US Institute of Peace:

This Blogs & Bullets meeting will bring together the companies that sift through and sell this data with the activists that create it and the policy-makers who use it. We will look at the cutting-edge of technologies for analysis with experts from around the world in an effort to expand our ability to harness these new platforms for conflict management and peacebuilding. The event will be webcast live beginning at 9:00am EDT on September 16, 2011.

White House Jobs Bill Could Take Crowdfunding to Next Level

By Alex Howard, The Atlantic, Sept 9, 2011

There have now been more than 10,000 Kickstarter projects funded, with more than $75 million dollars pledged and a 44% success rate. This lightweight model for “crowdfunding” has caught the attention of the White House, which specifically highlighted how entrepreneurs are using Kickstarter to access capital — and how President Obama’s new “American Jobs Act” could extend that access to more high-growth companies. …

For full text of the article, visit White House Jobs Bill Could Take Crowdfunding to Next Level – Alex Howard – Technology – The Atlantic.

James Rainey on social media and civil unrest – LA Times

Social media crackdown? It’d be more than unsociable

By James Rainey, LA Times, August 17, 2011

Riots in London, violent flash mobs in Philadelphia and Wisconsin, protests clogging BART platforms in San Francisco. Against a backdrop of high unemployment and economic upheaval, we have entered the Summer of Jangled Nerves. Anxiety and clear thinking don’t usually mix, as evidenced by the commentators and government officials who have decided that the fault lies not, dear Twitter, in ourselves but in our social media. … But what about other restrictions, which might appear to protect the silent and law-abiding majority from a noisy and dangerous minority? …

For full text of the article, visit James Rainey on social media and civil unrest – latimes.com.

Parsing the Twitterverse: New Algorithms Analyze Tweets: Scientific American

By Francie Diep, Scientific American, July 22, 2011

Researchers have been trolling Twitter for insights into the human condition since shortly after the site launched in 2006. In aggregate, the service provides a vast database of what people are doing, thinking and feeling. But the research tools at scientists’ disposal are highly imperfect. Keyword searches, for example, return many hits but offer a poor sense of overall trends.When computer scientist James H. Martin of the University of Colorado at Boulder searched for tweets about the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, he found 14 million. “You can’t hire grad students to read them all,” he says. Researchers need a more automated approach. …

For full text of the article, visit Parsing the Twitterverse: New Algorithms Analyze Tweets: Scientific American.

Tech experts exit White House – POLITICO.com

By Kim Hart and Michelle Quinn, Politico Pro, 7/8/11

When President Barack Obama took office, he brought with him a pack of technology advocates with impressive résumés and ambitious visions. They wanted to improve the government through the use of Internet tools and iPhone apps and help shape communications policy to expand broadband. But the core group of techies that launched big initiatives has left the White House over the past six months, raising questions about what will become of the administration’s technology-focused goals…The administration says its commitment to technology remains strong. …

For full text of the article, visit Tech experts exit White House – Kim Hart and Michelle Quinn – POLITICO.com.

The Publication of National Security Information in the Digital Age

The Publication of National Security Information in the Digital Age

By Mary-Rose Papandrea, Journal of National Security Law & Policy, June 26, 2011

In one of her speeches on Internet freedom, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said that “[t]he fact that WikiLeaks used the internet is not the reason we criticized its actions.” Although Clinton is correct that it is essential to separate the technology. … New technology has made it much easier to leak and otherwise disseminate national security information. At the same time, leaks continue to play an essential role in checking governmental power and often make invaluable contributions to our public debate. … One dominant theme in the discussion of how to strike the balance between an informed public and the need to protect legitimate national security secrets is whether new media entities like WikiLeaks are part of “the press” and whether Julian Assange and his cohorts are engaging in“journalism.” As the gathering and distribution of news and information becomes more widely dispersed, and the act of informing the public more participatory and collaborative, however, determining who is engaging in journalism and what constitutes the press has become increasingly difficult. It is not possible to draw lines based on the medium of communication, the journalistic background of the publisher, the editing process, the size of the audience, or the methods used to obtain the information.

For full text of the report, visit The Publication of National Security Information in the Digital Age | Journal of National Security Law & Policy.

The Legal Implications of Social Networking Part I

By David Navetta, Information Law Group, June 11, 2011

Summary:
Much like the “Cloud computing revolution” there is an almost frenzied excitement around social media, and many companies are stampeding to exploit social networking.  The promise of increased intimate customer interactions, input and loyalty, and enhanced sales and expanded market share can result in some organizations overlooking the thorny issues arising out of social networking.  Many of these issues are legal in nature and could increase the legal risk and liability potential of an organization employing a social media strategy.

In this multi-part series the InfoLawGroup will identify and explore the legal implications of social media. This series will help organizations begin to identify some of the legal risks associated with social media so that they may start addressing and mitigating these risks while maximizing their social media strategy.

In Part One of the series, we will provide a high level overview of the legal risks and issues associated with an organization’s use of social media. In subsequent parts members of the InfoLawGroup team will take a deeper dive into these matters, and provide some practical insight and strategic direction for addressing these issues.   As always, we view our series as the beginning of a broader conversation between ourselves and the larger community, and we welcome and strongly encourage comments, concerns, corrections and criticisms.

View the entire entry:
http://www.infolawgroup.com/2011/06/articles/social-networking/the-legal-implications-of-social-networking-the-basics-part-one/index.html

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