Tag Archive | Services

Cost Recovery in Public Sector GIS Programs

GIS Program Revenue Generation and Legal Issues in Public Sector Organizations

by Peter Croswell and Alex Wernher, URISA, 2004

Abstract: In late 2003, The authors, in coordination with the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA), conducted a survey to learn about the status of financial, legal, and policy issues impacting public sector geographic information system (GIS) programs in the United States. More specifically, the survey’s purpose was to gather information about revenue generation through the sale of GIS products and services by organizations administering public agency GIS programs. This publication describes the approach and results of this survey, which included responses from a number of federal, state, regional, and local public agencies. In addition, this publication provides an overview of important concepts and issues that impact the distribution and sale of products and services from public agency GIS programs.

It will discuss the types of GIS products and services being provided by public agencies to external organizations and the nature and legal basis of agreements for cost sharing and funding of GIS programs. A review of important legal concerns will cover such areas as: a) impacts of state open records laws, b) privacy regulations, c) copyright restrictions on GIS databases, d) liability issues and other policy and legal issues. It will summarize the results of a national survey conducted in the Fall of 2003 which gathered information from public agencies on: The status of revenue generation programs; GIS products, services and fee schedules; Non-traditional funding sources; Interagency agreements and consortia; and Legal issues impacting GIS data and product distribution.

For full text of this report and survey, click here.

Agriculture pulls all GIS maps into a single portal – Nextgov

By Joseph Marks, Nextgov, August 17, 2011

A new Web portal being put together by the Agriculture Department aims to reduce duplication in the agency’s mapping work and make high-quality maps more accessible to the public.More than half the department’s 29 divisions are involved in geospatial work, Geospatial Information Officer Stephen Lowe said, either mashing satellite and aerial imagery with survey data or on-the-ground research about crop yields, ground chemicals or farm subsidies, or using other divisions’ maps in their own research and programs.USDA-produced maps and images generally are available to the public for free or for a nominal fee, and frequently crop up in paid data services and even in Google Maps, he said. …

via Agriculture pulls all GIS maps into a single portal – Nextgov.

Projects Use Phone Data to Track Public Services – NYTimes.com

By Joshua Brunstein, NYT, June 5, 2011

…The city’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority has been trying to provide a better sense of predictability in recent years by adding displays in stations that state when the next train is expected. Now, a Web development firm called Densebrain says that it can do the same thing at practically no cost, by analyzing how people lose phone service when they head underground. Urban planners, technology companies and officials from local governments see potential in projects like these that mine data collected from phones to provide better public services. …

Full text of the article via Projects Use Phone Data to Track Public Services – NYTimes.com.

The Carbon Project Awarded U.S. Patent for P2P Geosocial Data Sharing

BURLINGTON, MA, April 14, 2011 – The Carbon Project today announced the award of a United States patent for the technology behind its next-generation Geosocial Networking® infrastructures. … The patent claims encompass The Carbon Project’s methods for searching, obtaining and distributing geospatial information directly between applications in P2P networks, including addresses, coordinates, street maps, satellite images, geospatial features, geographically referenced notes and digital media such as photographs. The technology can support a wide variety of new applications and services in areas such as local advertising, Geosocial Networking®, emergency response, geospatial intelligence and others on fixed and mobile peer devices.

For full text of the article, visit the GIS Cafe via The Carbon Project Awarded U.S. Patent for P2P Geosocial Data Sharing.

Video: Michael Goodchild discusses using social networks to define landscapes. – US National Science Foundation (NSF)

Director of the University of California, Santa Barbara’s Center for Spatial Studies Michael Goodchild discusses “From Community Mapping to Critical Spatial Thinking: The Changing Face of GIS (geographic information systems)” in this National Science Foundation Distinguished Lecture. He discusses how individuals are using distributed, real-time data enabled by social networks to define landscapes that have been suddenly altered by floods, hurricanes and other acts of nature.

To watch video, visit: nsf.gov – News – Video – Michael Goodchild discusses using social networks to define landscapes. – US National Science Foundation (NSF).

Grand Challenges in Geospatial Science Research

The  Directorate for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences of the National Science Foundation (NSF/SBE) seeks to frame innovative research for the year 2020 and beyond that enhances fundamental knowledge and benefits society. NSF/SBE invited individuals and groups to contribute white papers in which authors were asked to outline grand challenge questions that are both foundational and transformative. At the conclusion of the submission period on October 15, 2010, 244 unique papers were received covering the full range of the SBE sciences.

The University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) submitted the following white paper on spatial dynamics and CyberGIS. The UCGIS Winter Meeting:  Place-Based Geospatial Summit will be held at the Doubletree Hotel in Washington, DC on February 3rd and 4th, 2011. For registration and the agenda, click here.

 

Spatial Dynamics and CyberGIS for NSF SBE 2020

Lead Author: Yuan, May

Abstract: University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) advocates that spatial dynamics and cyberGIS be identified as two grand research challenges for SBE 2020. Spatial dynamics and cyberGIS ask fundamental questions about the complexity, dynamics, and synthesis of social, behavioral, and economic systems. Making connections across space and time enables knowledge building beyond disciplinary boundaries to understand how new findings in one discipline relate to another for a holistic understanding of human dimensions. Expanding upon the spatial emphasis in geographic information science research, spatial dynamics research investigates cognitive and methodological advances to conceptualize, represent, analyze, and model the integrative spatiotemporal characteristics and processes of global systems. CyberGIS research enables a synthesis framework leveraging GIS and cyberinfrastructure to build a collaborative cybercommons of distributed benchmark datasets, computational testbeds, and knowledge webs for social, behavioral, and economic sciences. The fact that social network media is expanding rapidly and being accessed by a broad spectrum of society, and new generations of digital natives are stepping up to take center stage, gives unprecedented opportunities to allow real-time or near-real time spatially referenced data for SBE research. Grand research challenges of spatial dynamics and cyberGIS, both individually and more effectively together, are essential to understand spatial connections of activities, events, and processes across scales and dimensions for a cyber SBE knowledge enterprise with capabilities for SBE forecasting and predictions, and even nowcasting enabled by sensor networks, cell phone signals, or twitters.

For full text of the article, click here.

 

Other geospatial-related white papers submitted to NSF SBE 2020:

NSGIC News: Should There Be An Exam for GIS Certification? (Updated)

Should There Be An Exam for GIS Certification?

The GIS Certification Institute (GISCI) is looking for input on a proposal to update the requirements for GIS Professional (GISP) certification. A major part of the proposed update (PDF) is the addition of a required examination. The proposal has been placed on-line for comments at gisci.ideascale.com.

For full text of the article, visit NSGIC News: Should There Be An Exam for GIS Certification? (Updated).

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