Tag Archive | Research

Spatial Computing 2020 Report Released

This one-and-a-half-day NSF/CCC sponsored visioning workshop on Spatial Computing outlined an effort to develop and promote a unified agenda for Spatial Computing research and development across US agencies, industries, and universities (Report PDF).

The workshop identified (1) fundamental research questions for individual computing disciplines and (2) cross-cutting research questions requiring novel, multi-disciplinary solutions. The workshop included US leaders in academia and the public sector. Results of this workshop were presented to the NSF in order to inform possible funding initiatives.

The workshop included presentations from invited thought-leaders and agency representatives, brainstorming, and interactive demos and focus group sessions with spatial computing professionals.

Workshop agenda and participant list

Download the report (pdf) here:
http://cra.org/ccc/files/docs/Spatial_Computing_Report-2013.pdf

 

 

Urban research: The laws of the city – a deludge of data makes cities laboratories

The Economist, Jun 23rd 2012

… Better technology has turned cities into fountains of data that confirm known regularities and reveal striking new patterns. This could transform how cities are regarded, built and managed. Attempts to contain urban sprawl, long the prevailing paradigm of urban planning, for instance, could fall out of favour.  … This has triggered new research. For instance Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt, both of the Santa Fe Institute, found that cities scale much like organisms. Just as an elephant is, roughly speaking, a larger but more energy-efficient version of a gorilla, big cities are thrifty versions of small ones. For a metropolis twice the size of another, the length of electric cables, number of gas stations and other bits of infrastructure decrease by about 15% per inhabitant. But beasts do not enjoy the cities’ rising returns to scale. Income, patents, savings and other signs of wealth rise by around 15% when a city’s size doubles. In short, urbanites consume less but produce more. …

For full text of the article, visit Urban research: The laws of the city | The Economist.

Global Social Media Research Symposium

The Global Social Media Research Symposium on March 23, 2012, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at American University, Washington, DC, will explore current research on the worldwide use of social media for societal reform and cultural-political transformation. The symposium will feature representatives from major technology companies, policy experts, journalists, researchers, and research groups. Panel sessions will be devoted to social media technologies and innovation along with their application across national borders, the role of government in promoting access to these technologies, and recent research findings on social media reform movements worldwide.

The Global Social Media Research Symposium will take place in the new School of International Service building Abramson Family Founders Room on the main campus of American University. Refreshments during session breaks and reception at the conclusion of the Symposium at 5 p.m. are provided. For information, contact Prof. Shalini Venturelli, School of International Service: sventur@american.edu and Jason Smith, Symposium Director: js1232a@american.edu.

For more information, visit Global Social Media Research Symposium | International Communication Program | School of International Service | American University, Washington, D.C..

Status of FY 2012 Appropriations Bills

by Richard Jones, AIP FYI Blog, August 31, 2011

The next few months will be important in determining the funding of federal scientific research in Fiscal Year 2012.  Although FY 2012 starts a month from tomorrow, Congress is unlikely to settle on final budgets until later this year.  Short term funding will be provided through one or bills.  The outlook is more promising for a quicker resolution of the final appropriations than in previous years because Congress and the Administration have settled on an overall cap on FY 2012 discretionary spending

For more information, click here.

Presentations from National Academies’ Symposium on International Scientific Data Sharing

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From Paul Uhlir, Director, Board on Research Data and Information, National Academy of Sciences:
Presentations from Symposium on International Scientific Data Sharing The Board of Research Data and Information (BRDI) at the U.S. National Academies co-sponsored a free, two-day symposium on April 18-19th in Washington, DC on international scientific data sharing, with focus on developing countries. The presentations from the event are available online. The symposium sought to address the following questions:
1. Why is the international sharing of publicly funded scientific data important, especially for development? What are some examples of past successes and what are the types of global research and applications problems that can be addressed with more complete access to government data collections and government-funded data sources?
2. What is the status of public data access internationally, particularly in developing countries?
3. What are the principal barriers and limits to sharing public data across borders?
4. What are the rights and responsibilities of scientists and research organizations with regard to providing and getting access to publicly funded scientific data? How can international scientific organizations, government agencies, and scientists improve sharing of publicly funded data to address global challenges, particularly in less economically developed countries, more successfully?

Call for Papers for Special Issue on Public Participation GIS

‘Looking Forward to the Past: Reflections on Using Applied PPGIS to Define Community’

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA Journal)

Guest Editors: Dr. Michelle M. Thompson and Kelly D. Owens
Department of Planning and Urban Studies, University of New Orleans

The application of geographic information systems (GIS) continues to emerge as the tools are adopted by both information and social sciences.  The ability to share dwindling resources by community, municipal and university partners has moved from the desktop to the information highway.  Early definitions of public participation geographic information systems (PPGIS) emphasized the university as the change agent since the technology drove collaboration. Resident-led PPGIS models focus on the collection and distribution of neighborhood level data using distributed web-based interfaces.

This special issue of the URISA Journal, scheduled for publication in November 2012, is intended to update the available body of applied GIS literature.  In particular, research should explore problems or questions on PPGIS strategies including effectiveness measures and implementation at varying levels of delivery. The discussion should include the changes in technology and data definitions including ‘volunteered geographic information’ or ‘VGI’ in the PPGIS model. Research may consider what influence of ‘crowdsourcing’ as a means to move PPGIS from participatory to action research, as well as, the impact on public policy in local and international spheres.  Research that considers PPGIS in emerging markets, shrinking cities or post-disaster environments and how the application of a PPGIS can aid in relearning pedagogy are considered an important perspective.

While it is important to consider the foundations of PPGIS and the traditional definitions of ‘partnership’, articles should describe how, or if, the model of participation has changed. When using contemporary examples, describe their ethical considerations in emerging markets from any part of the earth and address both earth and human-environment research.

For more information, visit http://www.urisa.org/Journal_PPGIS

Europe’s Article 29 Working Party issues smart meter guidelines

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Source: HL Chronicle of Data Protection, April 18, 2011

Europe’s group of data protection authorities, the Article 29 Working Party, issued an opinion on smart meters, which goes into surprising detail on points such as the size of the display for the user interface, the need for a ‘push button’ consent module for consumers, the need to keep load graph data stored locally whenever possible.  The Art 29 WP stresses the need for energy suppliers and third party energy service companies to develop detailed data retention policies to ensure smart meter data are deleted as soon as no longer needed. … The opinion strongly recommends the implementation of Privacy by Design, including privacy impact assessments, security and privacy audits.

via Europe’s Article 29 Working Party issues smart meter guidelines : HL Chronicle of Data Protection.

International Symposium on the Case for International Scientific Data Sharing: A Focus on Developing Countries

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International Symposium on the Case for International Scientific Data Sharing:

A Focus on Developing Countries

Board on International Scientific Organizations and the U.S. Committee on Data for Science and Technology, Board on Research Data and Information, National Academy of Sciences in consultation with the Committee on Freedom and Responsibility in the conduct of Science, International Council for Science

to be held at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC on 18-19 April 2011

Find the agenda at:  BISO-BRDI-CFRS Joint Symposium Agenda.

SUMMARY

The Board on International Scientific Organizations (BISO), and the U.S. Committee on Data for Science and Technology (US CODATA) under the Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI), in consultation with the Committee on Freedom and Responsibility in the Conduct of Science (CFRS) of the International Council for Science ICSU), are organizing a 2-day international symposium. The meeting will be held on Monday-Tuesday, 18-19 April 2011, at the National Academy of Sciences’ Keck Center, 500 Fifth Street NW, Washington, DC.

The symposium will address the following questions:

1. Why is the international sharing of publicly funded scientific data important, especially for development? What are some examples of past successes and what are the types of global research and applications problems that can be addressed with more complete access to government data collections and government-funded data sources?
2. What is the status of public data access internationally, particularly in developing countries?
3. What are the principal barriers and limits to sharing public data across borders?
4. What are the rights and responsibilities of scientists and research organizations with regard to providing and getting access to publicly funded scientific data? How can international scientific organizations, government agencies, and scientists improve sharing of publicly funded data to address global challenges, particularly in less economically developed countries, more successfully?

A proceedings from the symposium will be published by the National Academies Press.

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Measuring the Impacts of Federal Investments in Research and Development

Measuring the Impacts of Federal Investments in Research: A Workshop

Monday-Tuesday, April 18-19, 2011

20 F Street (NW) Conference Center

Washington, D.C. 20001

A committee formed under the auspices of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) and Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP) is holding a two-day workshop to identify analytical and data needs and opportunities in assessing the returns to federal research funding across a wide range of fields and government missions.   The meeting is targeted for:

  • Federal agency research evaluators
  • Congressional staff with research jurisdictions
  • Science funding advocates
  • Science of science policy scholars
  • Other academics

Questions to be discussed include:

What have we learned from previous efforts to measure the economic and noneconomic benefits of federal research investments?

What are the links between health research and health outcomes and costs?

Can we measure the impact of research on non-market values such as climate change mitigation, food security, environmental protection, and national security?

What progress has been made in constructing a long-term data infrastructure for measuring research impacts? Can approaches such as STAR Metrics be broadened to encompass different performers and funding mechanisms?

What methods and metrics are being used in Europe, Latin America, and elsewhere?

What metrics and data are needed to track career choices and career development of STEM graduates trained with research funds?

How might we assess the influence of research on formal (e.g., regulatory, judicial) and informal (e.g., consumer, patient) decision-making?

For more information and to register for the workshop, via Returns on Federal R&D.

The Future of Scientific Knowledge Discovery in Open Networked Environments: A National Symposium and Workshop

The Future of Scientific Knowledge Discovery in Open Networked Environments:
A National Symposium and Workshop
Washington, DC, March 10-11, 2011

The Symposium is free and open to the public, but advance registration is requested. Please RSVP to Cheryl Levey atclevey@nas.edu.

Board on Research Data and Information
in collaboration with
Computer Science and Telecommunications Board
National Academy of Sciences

[ Summary ] [ Meeting Agenda ] [ Steering Committee Members ]

SUMMARY

Digital technologies and networks have enhanced access to and use of scientific data, information, and literature significantly, and also have great promise for accelerating the discovery and the communication of knowledge both within the scientific community and in the broader society. This is particularly the case for scientific data and information that are openly available online. Scientific knowledge discovery in open networked environments, referred to in this proposal as computer-mediated or computational scientific knowledge discovery, may be defined as a research process that is enabled by different digital computing technologies such as data mining, information retrieval and extraction, artificial intelligence, distributed grid computing, and many other automated methods. Together, these technological capabilities are supporting the emergence of computer-mediated knowledge discovery as a new paradigm in the conduct of research.

A symposium and workshop will be convened in Washington, DC to bring together key stakeholders in this area for intensive and structured discussions in order to obtain a better understanding of the state-of-the-art and future trends in the study of computational scientific knowledge discovery in the open online environment and to develop a range of options for future work in this area. Specifically, the project will be performed pursuant to the following statement of task:

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