Tag Archive | Republican

Two-week measure postpones shutdown

Two-week measure postpones shutdown

By: David Rogers, Politico, February 25, 2011 10:29 AM EST

Threats of a government shutdown next week had all but disappeared by late Friday as Democrats reacted favorably to a Republican plan that would keep agencies operating past Mar. 4 while making a first down payment toward a larger budget deal.The two-week peace is only temporary but gives House and Senate leaders through Mar 18 to try to resolve conservative demands for more than $60 billion in spending cuts, all concentrated in the second half of this fiscal year.

For full article, visit Two-week measure postpones shutdown – POLITICO.com Print View.

Advertisements

POLITICO: Is a U.S. government shutdown likely?

POLITICO Breaking News
————————————————-

A high-ranking aide to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) told Democratic chiefs of staff that a government shutdown is more likely than not, according to attendees. Speaking at a regular meeting of the top aides to House Democrats, Pelosi’s floor director, Jerry Hartz, offered up his assessment that the odds favor inaction before the government runs out of money, sources said. A shutdown would only happen if the House and Senate can’t reach a deal on the continuing resolution that expires on March 4.

For more information… http://www.politico.com

Congressional Reaction to Proposed Spending Changes

FYI#15, API Bulletin on Science Policy News, Richard Jones, February 11, 2011

FYI #13 outlined a series of budgetary changes that the House Appropriations Committee had proposed to reduce FY 2011 funding by $74 billion from the amount requested by the Administration. Since that plan was announced, fiscally-conservative Republicans have demanded further cuts in the FY 2011 budget. In response, House Appropriations Committee Chairman Harold Rogers (R-KY) released the below statement yesterday about the Continuing Resolution (CR) that is scheduled to be brought to the House floor next week. This bill will continue funding after a stop gap measure expires on March 4.

“My Committee has been working diligently to go line-by-line in every agency budget to find and cut unnecessary spending to reduce our deficit and help our economy thrive. After meeting with my subcommittee Chairs, we have determined that the CR can and will reach a total of $100 billion in cuts compared to the President’s request immediately — fully meeting the goal outlined in the Republican ‘Pledge to America’ in one fell swoop. Our intent is to make deep but manageable cuts in nearly every area of government, leaving no stone unturned and allowing no agency or program to be held sacred. I have instructed my committee to include these deeper cuts, and we are continuing to work to complete this critical legislation.” …

For full text of the article, visit Congressional Reaction to Proposed Spending Changes.

House Republicans Propose New FY 2011 S&T Budgets

FYI#15, API Bulletin of Science Policy News, Richard Jones, February 10, 2011

Next week the House of Representatives may vote on a funding bill that would make significant changes in some S&T agency budgets. Under an initial version of this bill:

* The budget for the Department of Energy’s Office of Science would be reduced by 18.0 percent or $882.3 million from the current level.

* Funding for the National Institute of Standards and Technology would be cut by 14.4 percent or $123.7 million.

* NASA’s budget would remain essentially level, declining 0.6 percent or $103 million.

* The budget for the U.S. Geological Survey would also remain level, declining 0.5 percent or $5.3 million.

* The National Science Foundation’s budget would increase 6.0 percent or $412.9 million.

These changes were in a list of seventy proposed budget recommendations released yesterday by the House Appropriations Committee that were projected to total $74 billion. Additional budget cuts will be made in the bill before it goes to the full House. Chairman Rogers just announced that these cuts will total $100 billion from what President Obama requested. That forthcoming bill – a continuing resolution or CR – would provide funding after an existing short-term bill expires on March 4.

via House Republicans Propose New FY 2011 S&T Budgets.

Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release

South façade of the White House, the executive...

Image via Wikipedia

Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release

by Richard Jones, FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News, Number 10, Feb 1, 2011

Yesterday the White House announced that the Administration will send its FY 2012 budget request to Congress on Monday, February 14.  The submission is a week later than usual because the confirmation of the new director of the Office of Management and Budget was delayed. The development of the budget request was undoubtedly made more difficult because Congress has not passed any of the FY 2011 appropriations bills.  Making it even more complicated is the effort being made by House Republicans to reduce FY 2011 spending to FY 2008 levels. President Obama recommended in his State of the Union that non-security spending be frozen for five years except for defense, homeland security, and veterans’ programs.  Importantly, he advocated that government spending increase for science and education. Following the speech, the White House released a document providing additional detail about the FY 2012 budget request, selections of which follow…

For full text of the article, visit Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release.

Changes in the 112th Congress and Upcoming Appropriations Battles

The western front of the United States Capitol...

Image via Wikipedia

The December 2010 issue of the Science and Technology in Congress newsletter is now available online at http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/stc/index.shtml.

The latest science-related news on Capitol Hill from the AAAS Center for Science, Technology and Congress


Changes Coming in the 112th Congress
The 112th Congress will feature a host of new faces, a new Republican majority in the House, and several changes in committee structures. In the House, changes include the abolishment of the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, the creation of new subcommittees, and a plethora of new Chairmen and Ranking Members.
Read the full story here.

FY 2011 Appropriations Battles to Continue Next Year
Congress passed the Continuing Appropriations and Surface Transportation Extensions Act, 2011 (H.R.3082) on December 21. This short-term extension of federal funding at FY 2010 levels through March 4, 2011, sets up a face-off in the new Congress between the newly-elected House Republican majority that is pushing for $100 billion in discretionary cuts and the Democrat-led Senate. Additionally, Congress finalized the extension of several tax cuts, including the R&D tax credit.
Read the full story here.

Senate Passes COMPETES Act by Unanimous Consent

Today, the United States Senate passed an amended version of H.R. 5116, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 by Unanimous Consent. The legislation will need House approval.

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Chairman John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV released this statement following Senate passage of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010: “This is an investment in America’s future and our long-term competitiveness in the global marketplace. This bill invests in R&D and in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education – drivers of our economy and keys to our economic success. The investments we make now in science, technology, research and STEM education will pay incredible dividends down the road. The original COMPETES Act was a response to the National Academies’ Rising Above The Gathering Storm, which warned that America’s place as a global leader in science and technology was at risk. The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 will focus on three primary areas of importance to increase American innovation and competitiveness: (1) increasing science and research investments, (2) strengthening science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education, and (3) developing an innovation infrastructure.”

For more information, please visit the Senate Commerce Committee‘s website.

House Committee on Science and Technology Chairman Bart Gordon (D-TN) offered the following statement: “The Reauthorization passed committee on April 28 with bipartisan support, it passed the House on May 26th with bipartisan support, and now, the Senate has weighed in and approved it—unanimously. While there have been concessions made, the Senate’s amendments preserve the intent of the Rising Above the Gathering Storm report and the original COMPETES. It keeps our basic research agencies on a doubling path, it continues to invest in high-risk, high-reward energy technology development, it will help improve STEM education, and it will help unleash American innovation. I am hopeful that this will come up before the House next week. I urge my House colleagues to stand with the business community, the academic community, the scientific community, and the Senate to send a strong message that the U.S. must maintain its scientific and economic leadership. I cannot think of anything I would rather do as one of my final acts in Congress than sending this bill, with strong bipartisan support, to the president’s desk.”

For more information, please visit the House Science and Technology Committee’s website.

%d bloggers like this: