Tag Archive | Reid

Federal Research and Development in the FY 2011 Budget Compromise

On Monday, April 11, the U.S. House of Representatives introduced the bill to fund the federal government for the last half of FY 2011. This bill will be taken up in the House on April 13th and in the Senate on April 14th, and then sent to the President for his signature, hopefully before the midnight deadline on Friday, April 15th. If passed, non-defense funding levels will be reduced by a 0.2 percent across-the-board cut to achieve savings of approximately $1.1 billion. Specific details on programmatic cuts for Federal R&D can be found in the articles blow:

Text of the Legislation:

A summary of the legislation:

 

R&D in the FY 2011 Compromise

by Patrick Clemins, Ph.D., AAAS R&D Budget and Policy Program, April 13, 2011

Congress released their year-long continuing resolution for FY 2011 this morning which contains a total of around $38.5 billion in cuts, the largest collection of spending cuts in history. R&D intensive programs and agencies were spared the worst of the cuts. Basic research programs faired the best, while applied research programs, especially at the Department of Energy did less well, accurately reflecting the current policy debates taking place. Basic research generally has broad, bi-partisan support, but there is discussion as to how much the federal government should be involved in applied research and the role of industry in funding the applied research stage of the innovation pipeline.

For full text of the article and other related resources, visit: http://www.aaas.org/spp/rd/

 

FYI #48: Details of Final FY 2011 Appropriations Bill Emerging

By Richard Jones, American Institute of Physics

Total FY 2011 funding will be $78.5 billion less than that requested by the Obama Administration. … A release from the Senate Appropriations Committee states, “as these cuts must be implemented in just the remaining six months of the fiscal year, their impact will be especially painful in some instances.” The below figures, provided by the House Appropriations Committee, do not include the 0.2 percent across the board cut that was made to all non-defense accounts.  In all instances, reductions from current FY 2010 levels are shown, and the numbers are rounded.  It should also be noted that the House Appropriations statement explains: “This list contains highlighted program cuts. This list is not comprehensive of all program funding levels in the legislation.”

National Science Foundation
Research and Related Activities: Down $43 million
Education and Human Resources: Down $10 million

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Education: Down $38 million
Cross Agency Support: Down $83 million

U.S. Geological Survey: Down $26 million

For full text of the article, visit: http://www.aip.org/fyi/2011/048.html

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Details of the Bipartisan Budget Deal | The White House

Posted by Dan Pfeiffer on April 09, 2011 at 06:44 PM EDT

Last night, President Obama announced that the federal government will remain open for business because Americans from different beliefs came together, put politics aside, and met the expectations of the American people. … This deal cuts spending by $78.5 billion from the President’s FY 2011 Budget request — the largest annual spending cut in our history. …Even though we will no longer double the funding of key research and development agencies, you will still see strong investments in National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Science Foundation and the Office of Science. …

For full text of the article, visit: Details of the Bipartisan Budget Deal | The White House.

Mid-Term Elections – Interactive Maps of Ratings and Results

New York Times 2010 Mid-term Election Race – Mapping the Results: Starting at around 6 p.m. Eastern time, when polls close in the eastern parts of Indiana and Kentucky, we will be updating interactive maps for all House, Senate and governors’ races. For Senate and governors’ races, you can click on a state to zoom in and see the results at the county level — roll your mouse over a county and you’ll see the vote totals there, as well as the percentage of precincts reporting. The maps will be accessible both on the NYTimes.com home page and on our mobile site, as well as in much larger versions on http://elections.nytimes.com/ (Just click the “View Larger Map »” link in the bottom-right corner of the national map.)

For NYT interactive maps of the House and Senate race ratings and elections results, visit the followinglinks:

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