Tag Archive | Private sector

Presidential Innovation Fellows | The White House

The White House Website, May 2012

The Presidential Innovation Fellows will pair top innovators from the private sector, non-profits, or academia with top innovators in government to collaborate on game-changing solutions that aim to deliver significant results in six months. Each team of innovators will work together in-person in Washington, DC on focused sprints while being supported by a broader community of interested citizens throughout the country. What makes this initiative unique is its focus on unleashing the ingenuity and know-how of Americans from all sectors. The five projects that will launch in summer 2012 have straightforward goals: to improve the lives of the American people, saving taxpayer money, and fueling job creation. This is innovation aimed at making a difference for all Americans.

For more information about this program, visit Presidential Innovation Fellows | The White House.

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Limits on the Private Sector after US v Jones

Three great articles by Robert Gellman on location privacy, on First Amendment & Fourth Amendment issues in the US Supreme Court’s GPS Tracking case (US v. Jones), and on the complexities of legislating privacy after US v Jonesin the Communia Blog of the Woodrow Wilson Center‘s Commons Lab.

Robert Gellman, JD is a privacy and information policy consultant in Washington, D.C. He served for 17 years on the staff of a subcommittee in the House of Representatives. He can be reached at bob [at] bobgellman. [dot] com or visit his website at http://www.bobgellman.com/.

LIVE WEBCAST: Social Media in Emergency Management: Transforming the Response Enterprise

Washington, D.C. — By harnessing the collective power of citizens and engaging communities in their own response and recovery, social media have the power to revolutionize emergency management. Yet, many challenges—including guidelines for use by response agencies, demonstration of value, and characterization of reliability—must be addressed if the potential of social media is to be fully realized in emergency response and relief efforts in the United States.

Please join us on November 10th for this panel and roundtable discussion, which will be chaired by Dr. Clarence Wardell of CNA and will feature findings from the report, 2011 Social Media + Emergency Management Camp: Transforming the Response Enterprise. Panelists from FEMA, the Red Cross, emergency management, and the digital volunteer community will discuss the report and offer policy and research recommendations for moving forward with the adoption, integration, and practice of social media in emergency management.

TIME: November 10th from 8:30 – 10:00 AM EST

LOCATIION: 5th floor board room, Woodrow Wilson Center, Reagan Building, Washington, D.C. (Federal Triangle Metro).

Follow the event on Twitter with the #SMEM11 hashtag.

For information about the event and to watch it live, visit Social Media in Emergency Management: Transforming the Response Enterprise | Wilson Center.

Data Philanthropy: Public & Private Sector Data Sharing for Global Resilience | Global Pulse

Robert Kirkpatrick, UN Global Pulse Blog, September 16, 2011

Learning to Live with Volatility. The digital revolution of the first decade of this new century has brought many wonders, yet it has also has ushered in a bewildering array of unanticipated consequences. We now find ourselves in a volatile and hyperconnected world where risk has been globalized. … However, the same technologies that connect us to one another have also turned all of us into prolific producers of data, and this new data may hold the keys to mitigating much of the volatility and uncert ainty that now confronts us. …One of the defining challenges of the second decade of this century will be for the public sector to learn how to tap into this new “unnatural resource” to understand the changing needs of citizens and respond with agility.

For full text of the article, visit: Data Philanthropy: Public & Private Sector Data Sharing for Global Resilience | Global Pulse.

National Location Data Standard Approved – Does The Private Sector Care?

by Marshall Kirkpatrick, Read Write Web, April 26, 2011

After five years of interagency collaboration and thousands of points of public communication, a new standard data format for addresses, thoroughfares and landmarks has been approved by the final agency acronym it needs to be in order for the project to reach its culmination. This seems like it could be huge news in a world where mobile location apps are set to define the future of the computing user experience – but for some reason the standard seems mired in government circles with little comment or enthusiasm from the private sector.

via National Location Data Standard Approved – Does The Private Sector Care?.

Geographical Information as “Personal Information”


Source: Teresa Scassa , University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law, Common Law Section, August 8, 2010
The rapid proliferation of applications using geographical information combined with the growing accessibility of vast quantities of data of all kinds has given rise to a number of data protection challenges. Information is placed in geographic context by governments, private sector actors, and even by individuals; compilations of data may be sole-authored or crowd-sourced, and are frequently made available over the internet. This paper explores a key question in the data protection context: when is information placed in geographical context personal information? Particular challenges in answering this question include the way in which geographical information may be a key to re-identifying de-identified data, and how it can be used to link aggregate demographic data to specific individuals. For full text of the article on the Social Science Research Network, click here.

Public Sector Information Policies and their Economic Impacts

Borders in Cyberspace: Conflicting Public Sector Information Policies and their Economic Impacts

This summary report by Peter Weiss (February 2002) offers a comparison between the PSI re-use market within the US and Europe and how the impact that the different policy approaches on access, copyright and re-use related to PSI has impacted the PSI re-use market. The report seeks to demonstrate the economic and social benefits of open access and dissemination policies for public sector information, particularly as opposed to the limitations of the “cost recovery ” or  “government commercialisation” approach. The report offers good coverage of conclusions of recent economic and public policy research, as well as examples of failed or limited cost recovery experiments in the US and Europe.

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