Tag Archive | PPGIS

Call for Papers for Special Issue on Public Participation GIS

‘Looking Forward to the Past: Reflections on Using Applied PPGIS to Define Community’

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA Journal)

Guest Editors: Dr. Michelle M. Thompson and Kelly D. Owens
Department of Planning and Urban Studies, University of New Orleans

The application of geographic information systems (GIS) continues to emerge as the tools are adopted by both information and social sciences.  The ability to share dwindling resources by community, municipal and university partners has moved from the desktop to the information highway.  Early definitions of public participation geographic information systems (PPGIS) emphasized the university as the change agent since the technology drove collaboration. Resident-led PPGIS models focus on the collection and distribution of neighborhood level data using distributed web-based interfaces.

This special issue of the URISA Journal, scheduled for publication in November 2012, is intended to update the available body of applied GIS literature.  In particular, research should explore problems or questions on PPGIS strategies including effectiveness measures and implementation at varying levels of delivery. The discussion should include the changes in technology and data definitions including ‘volunteered geographic information’ or ‘VGI’ in the PPGIS model. Research may consider what influence of ‘crowdsourcing’ as a means to move PPGIS from participatory to action research, as well as, the impact on public policy in local and international spheres.  Research that considers PPGIS in emerging markets, shrinking cities or post-disaster environments and how the application of a PPGIS can aid in relearning pedagogy are considered an important perspective.

While it is important to consider the foundations of PPGIS and the traditional definitions of ‘partnership’, articles should describe how, or if, the model of participation has changed. When using contemporary examples, describe their ethical considerations in emerging markets from any part of the earth and address both earth and human-environment research.

For more information, visit http://www.urisa.org/Journal_PPGIS

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Public Participation in Environmental Decision-making

A document that might be of interest to the participatory mapping community:

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISIONMAKING

A new report from the National Research Council probes deeply into the positive and occasionally negative effects of public participation on the environmental policymaking process.

It is practically an article of faith in democratic societies that openness and public participation are presumptively good, but that doesn’t mean it’s true. On closer inspection, however, including empirical studies of participatory processes, the new NRC report was able to reach some encouraging conclusions.

“When done well, public participation improves the quality and legitimacy of a decision and builds the capacity of all involved to engage in the policy process.  It also can enhance trust and understanding among parties,” the report said.

On the other hand, “public participation, if not done well, may not provide any of these benefits — in some circumstances, participation has done more harm than good.”

The 250 page report, including a valuable 50 page bibliography, elucidates some of the conditions for successful participation and those that are likely to lead to failure.

….

See “Public Participation in Environmental Assessment and Decision Making” by Thomas Dietz and Paul C. Stern, editors, National Academies Press, 2008:

http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12434

Source: Steven Aftergood, Secrecy News, Volume 2008 Iusse No. 86, Sept 4, 2008

 

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