Tag Archive | Participatory Sensing

JCOM Special Issue on Citizen Science

Dear all,

We are pleased to announce publication of the first issue of JCOM for 2016.


SPECIAL ISSUE: CITIZEN SCIENCE, PART I

We are delighted to publish the first in a two part series exploring Citizen Science. Following a call for papers, Bruce Lewenstein and Emma Weitkamp received 37 manuscripts. Following review, it was clear that we would need two issues to accommodate the many worthy submissions. This newsletter introduces the essays and research papers that form part one of the Special Issue. April will see the publication of part two, and the final papers accepted through the call. We thank all the authors submitting manuscripts and the many reviewers contributing their time to peer review papers.


EDITORIAL

Can we understand citizen science?
Bruce V. Lewenstein

Citizen science is one of the most dramatic developments in science communication in the last generation. But analyses of citizen science, of what it means for science and especially for science communication, have just begun to appear. Articles in this first of two special issues of JCOM address three intertwined concerns in this emerging field: The motivation of citizen science participants, the relationship of citizen science with education, and the implications of participation for creation of democratic engagement in science-linked issues. Ultimately these articles contribute to answering the core question: What does citizen science mean?


ARTICLES AND ESSAYS
Read More…

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Future of 9-1-1? App Lets University Students Send Video Instantly to Police

Seal of the University of Maryland (Trademark ...

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by News Staff, Government Technology, September 16, 2011

University of Maryland students, faculty and staff were given access this week to a free Android smartphone app that gives them a direct and instantaneous line of communication to campus police and dispatch. With the M-Urgency app, smartphone users on the College Park campus have the ability to broadcast real-time audio and video to emergency dispatchers with the push of a button. Police and fire can also find the user’s approximate location by triangulating off of the phone’s built-in GPS and cell towers. … The Maryland Information and Network Dynamics (MIND) Lab and its director, computer science professor Ashok Agrawala, developed the app in collaboration with the university’s Department of Public Safety. … For full text of the article, visit: App Lets University Students Send Video Instantly to Police.

Information and Communication Technology Usage in the 2010 Pakistan Floods

NetHope Case Study: Information and Communication Technology Usage in 2010 Pakistan Floods, Published September 2011

In late summer 2010, the world watched as the people and lands of Pakistan were deluged by monsoon rainfall that triggered widespread flooding. These floods affected more than 20 million people, many of whom could be reached only by aircraft. Flood waters inundated and destroyed much of Pakistan’s vast wheat crop – the nation’s largest homegrown food source — creating a food crisis across Pakistan. Much of this you already know. What you may not know, but certainly can imagine, is the critical role information and communications technology (ICT) played in expediting aid to those in need. …

For full text of the case study report, visit NetHope’s Website or click here.

To Catch a Quake

by Ken Pimple, PAIT Project Director, Ethical Guidance for Pervasive and Autonomous IT Blog, August 26, 2011

In this week’s issue [of Science] (v. 333, n. 6046, Aug. 26, 2011), one of the seven featured publications is described in a paragraph entitled “To Catch a Quake” by Nicholas S. Wigginton (p. 1072). … Wigginton’s synopsis of the article describes the Quake-Catcher Network, “a volunteer-based seismic network that employs personal computers as low-cost seismic stations by sending seismic data collected with a small USB accelerometer through the user’s Internet connection.” After Chile’s huge earthquake in 2010, “volunteers rapidly installed nearly 100 accelerometers within weeks in and around the mainshock [sic] area.” …

For summary of and links to Wigginton’s article, visit Ethical Guidance for Pervasive and Autonomous IT.

Crowdsourcing GEOINT

Posted by Anthony Quartararo, Location Leverage,  Sep 06, 2011

There has been a growing discussion in the GEOINT community in recent years about crowdsourced information and what, if anything, should (could) be done with that information. The discussion is both ongoing, evolving and at times, very robust within certain components of the GEOINT community led by NGA. …

For full text of the article, visit Crowdsourcing GEOINT.

Facebook Investor Roger McNamee Explains Why Social Is Over

by Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry, Business Insider SAI,July 22, 2011

Elevation Partners and Facebook investor Roger McNamee, who is also a rock musician, gave an amazing talk recently where he goes over some of the biggest trends affecting the technology industry. … More specifically, a few big themes:

  • Microsoft is toast because we’re moving to a post-PC era;
  • HTML5, the new web standard that allows to make interactive web pages, is going to revolutionize the media and advertising industries;
  • Social is “done”, it’s now a feature, don’t go do a social startup. …

For full text of the article, visit Facebook Investor Roger McNamee Explains Why Social Is Over.

Crowdsourcing Democracy in Egypt

John F Moore, Government in the Lab, July 23, 2011

Throwing out President Hosni Mubarak was the easy part. Building a democracy is the hard one. Egypt will have its first post-revolution parliamentary election in September, and political activists are finding new methods to engage voters. These include social media and crowdsourcing tools utilized to raise discussions about the new constitution. Egyptians hope that technology will help them build a better nation.

For full text of the article, via Government In The Lab | Blog | Crowdsourcing Democracy in Egypt.

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