Tag Archive | Participatory Mapping

Zero Geography: Situating Neogeography

Situating Neogeography: Special Issue of Environment and Planning A

The special issue of Environment and Planning A on neogeography that Mark Graham edited with Matthew Wilson is now out an available to download. It will undoubtedly be a useful collection for anyone interested in thinking about the coming-togethers of information, the internet, and place.

For table of contents and links visit Zero Geography: Situating Neogeography: Special Issue of Environment and Planning A.

 

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Pakistan Ministry of Defense to Outlaw Civil Mapping

Pakistanis lost without maps

by Murtaza Haider, Dawn.com/DesPardes, November 21, 2012

The Ministry of Defence is about to declare mapping illegal in Pakistan. The federal cabinet, Pakistan’s foremost civilian authority, is willingly giving up a civic task to agencies that report to Pakistan’s Armed Forces.The proposed Land Surveying and Mapping Bill 2012 will entrust all mapping responsibilities in Pakistan to the Survey of Pakistan SoP, which supposedly reports to the Ministry of Defence MoD, but effectively takes its orders and cues from the General Head Quarters. Consider that the Surveyor General of Pakistan is often a serving or retired General, who leads the organisation that is not open to scrutiny by the civilian authorities.

For full text of this article, please visit Pakistanis lost without maps | DAWN.COM.

USGS Release: “Crowdsourcing” the National Map

“Crowdsourcing”: Looking at New Ways to Map Structures in Colorado

Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communications and Publishing
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119
Reston, VA 20192

Greg Matthews: Phone: 303-202-4446

Mark Newell: Phone: 573-308-3850

In light of swiftly changing technical landscapes and increasing uses of social networking, the USGS is exploring a new approach to the volunteer program, and is launching a project to test options for volunteer participation in providing data to The National Map. The project involves mapping man-made structures and facilities, such as schools and fire stations, in the state of Colorado. Using an internet mapping application, volunteers can help the USGS update The National Map by correcting or adding information about structures. “Even members of the public who can’t tell a sandstone from a rhyolite but have internet access can now help the USGS keep its popular maps up to date through our new experiment in crowd sourcing,” said USGS Director Marcia McNutt. “Correctly locating and identifying fire stations, police stations, schools, and hospitals not only makes USGS maps more useful, but can literally save a life.”

Over the past two decades, the USGS National Geospatial Program sponsored various forms of volunteer map data collection projects. Volunteers helped the USGS improve its maps during this period, by annotating paper maps, collecting data using GPS units, and submitting data using a web-based tool. However, in 2008, the volunteer mapping program was suspended as new methods for using volunteer data were being studied. In recent years, new web- and mobile-based technologies have made it easier to create, combine, and share maps. Recent events have shown how well these technologies support the rapid and relevant production of geographic information. If the Colorado pilot project is successful in attracting volunteers and capturing data for use in The National Map, the program may be expanded to other areas in the future. This project offers volunteers an opportunity to participate in providing data to The National Map and US Topo map products. For more information, interested Colorado volunteers can visit the National Map Corps website.

The National Map Corps website.

via USGS Release: “Crowdsourcing”: Looking at New Ways to Map Structures in Colorado 8/17/2012 8:00:00 AM.

Neogeography and the delusion of democratisation

by Muki Haklay, Po Ve Sham Blog,  22 June, 2012

“At the end of 2010, Matt Wilson (University of Kentucky) and Mark Graham(Oxford Internet Institute), started coordinating a special issue of Environment and Planning Adedicated to ‘Situating Neogeography’, asking ‘How might we situate neogeography? What are the various assemblages, networks, ecologies, configurations, discourses, cyborgs, alliances that enable/enact these technologies?’ My [Muki Hakly’s] response to this call is a paper titled ‘Neogeography and the delusion of democratisation’ and it is finally been accepted for publication. I am providing below an excerpt from the introduction, to provide a flavour of the discussion:

“Since the emergence of the World Wide Web (Web) in the early 1990s, claims about its democratic potential and practice are a persistent feature in the discourse about it. While awareness of the potential of ‘anyone, anytime, anywhere’ to access and use information was extolled for a long while (for an early example see Batty 1997), the emergence of Web 2.0 in the mid-2000s (O’Reilly 2005) increased this notion. In the popular writing of authors such as Friedman (2006), these sentiments are amplified by highlighting the ability of anyone to ‘plug into the flat earth platform’ from anywhere and anytime. …”

For full text of this thought provoking article, visit Neogeography and the delusion of democratisation « Po Ve Sham – Muki Haklay’s personal blog.

Tribes Effectively Barred From Making High-Tech Maps

An article from 2007, but still very relevant today.

by Kelly Hearn, National Geographic News, April 26, 2007

Tribes in Southeast Asia are being kept from using the latest high-tech gadgets to help them win land rights. That’s the outcry from activist groups that have been helping indigenous communities mix computers and handheld navigation devices with paints, yarn, and cardboard to make simple but accurate three-dimensional terrain models. … But in Malaysia and the Philippines, the practice—dubbed participatory GIS—has sparked a legal backlash, activists say. For example, Philippine lawmakers have changed an existing law so that only officially recognized engineers “could do anything related to measuring space,” said Dave De Vera, director of the Philippine Association for Intercultural Development. …

For full text of the article, visit Tribes Effectively Barred From Making High-Tech Maps.

Phones in the forests

by fortiain, Forest Planet, June 27, 2011

Imagine this: A rural village on the outskirts of Mkuwazi forest reserve in Northern Malawi. A woman, stops, takes out a smart phone, starts up an app, takes a picture of a tree, then walks on and continues her business. A short while later she takes another photo, then another. Each time she uses the app, information is automatically uploaded over a mobile phone network, and her SIM card is topped up with a small amount of credit, perhaps only the equivalent of 10 or 20p, but enough to make it worthwhile. Meanwhile, the data is being used to verify that the community’s forests are still intact, that nothing much has changed, and as a consequence, the community continues to receive a more substantial income for the carbon credits accredited to their forest. Its easy to imagine, but is it feasible any time soon?

For full text of article, visit Phones in the forests « Forest Planet.

Call for Papers for Special Issue on Public Participation GIS

‘Looking Forward to the Past: Reflections on Using Applied PPGIS to Define Community’

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA Journal)

Guest Editors: Dr. Michelle M. Thompson and Kelly D. Owens
Department of Planning and Urban Studies, University of New Orleans

The application of geographic information systems (GIS) continues to emerge as the tools are adopted by both information and social sciences.  The ability to share dwindling resources by community, municipal and university partners has moved from the desktop to the information highway.  Early definitions of public participation geographic information systems (PPGIS) emphasized the university as the change agent since the technology drove collaboration. Resident-led PPGIS models focus on the collection and distribution of neighborhood level data using distributed web-based interfaces.

This special issue of the URISA Journal, scheduled for publication in November 2012, is intended to update the available body of applied GIS literature.  In particular, research should explore problems or questions on PPGIS strategies including effectiveness measures and implementation at varying levels of delivery. The discussion should include the changes in technology and data definitions including ‘volunteered geographic information’ or ‘VGI’ in the PPGIS model. Research may consider what influence of ‘crowdsourcing’ as a means to move PPGIS from participatory to action research, as well as, the impact on public policy in local and international spheres.  Research that considers PPGIS in emerging markets, shrinking cities or post-disaster environments and how the application of a PPGIS can aid in relearning pedagogy are considered an important perspective.

While it is important to consider the foundations of PPGIS and the traditional definitions of ‘partnership’, articles should describe how, or if, the model of participation has changed. When using contemporary examples, describe their ethical considerations in emerging markets from any part of the earth and address both earth and human-environment research.

For more information, visit http://www.urisa.org/Journal_PPGIS

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