Tag Archive | Open science data

Tech@State: Data Visualization

The next Tech@State, scheduled for Sept 23-24, will feature new innovative and fascinating data visualization techniques. The event will also be streamed live on the Internet.

Agenda for Data Visualization

DAY 1:

8:00 AM – Doors Open

8:50 – 9:00 AM – Introduction, Suzanne Hall – Senior Advisor for Innovation, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs

9:00 – 9:15 AM – Welcome, Dr Kerri-Ann Jones, Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs

9:15 – 10:15 AM – Keynote Address – ‘Policy and Technology’ Edward Tufte

10:15 – 10:30 AM – Coffee Break

10:30 – 11:25 AM – Panel on ‘Development Challenge: Open Data to Making Sense of Data’

11:25 AM – 12:20 PM – Panel on ‘Latest Trends in Data Visualization’

12:20 – 12:30 PM – Showing of ‘Connected’ Trailer & Declaration of Interdependence Project

12:30 – 1:30 PM – Lunch

— Afternoon Breakouts —

1:30 – 3:00 PM

Session A

1.  Supporting Disaster Response and Coordination – Panelists Bios & Photos

2.  Visualizations for Aid Transparency and Management – Panelists Bios & Photos

3.  Best Practices for Visualization Interoperability – Panelist Bios & Photos

4.  State Department and USAID Data Visualization Projects – Panelist Bios & Photos

3:00 – 3:30 PM – Coffee Break

3:30 – 5:00 PM

Session B

1.  Using Climate and Health Data to Monitor Food Insecure Areas – Panelist Bios & Photos

2.  Mobile Technology and New Media:  Trends and Opportunities – Panelist Bios & Photos

3.  Turning Information into Insight – Panelist Bios & Photos

4.  New Ways to Visualize Development Data – Panelist Bios & Photos

 

 

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World Bank Webcast: Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open Solutions: Possibilities and Pitfalls

Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open Solutions: Possibilities and Pitfalls

Thursday, September 22, 2011; 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Watch Live from the World Bank Annual Meetings in Washington, DC! As part of the World Bank’s 2011 Annual Meetings and Civil Society Forum, The World Bank will host a discussion with leading members of the civil society, open government, open development communities to discuss a new “Open Development Agenda,” in which individuals are empowered to create better solutions for development issues. The session will begin with an overview of Open Development, its implications for development partners, and how this move toward greater openness in data and knowledge is changing the entire development paradigm. It will include a lively moderated conversation on the opportunities presented by open data, open knowledge, and open solutions and how these relate to development challenges and aid effectiveness. Topics will include: What are the potential limitations of “open”? How can we draw on knowledge, learning, and innovation from a much wider pool of “solvers” and donor resources? Participants will also have an opportunity to see new mobile apps and the updated Mapping for Results portal. The session will close with an open dialogue, where participants will have an opportunity to present their ideas and feedback on the changing roles of the private sector, civil society organizations, and governments in making development more effective.

Outgoing federal CIO warns of ‘an IT cartel’ – Computerworld

en:Vivek Kundra Headshot

Image via Wikipedia

By Patrick Thibodeau, Computer World, July 18, 2011

WASHINGTON – In a wide-ranging discussion Friday with President Barack Obama’s top science advisors, Federal CIO Vivek Kundra warned of the dangers of open data access and complained of “an IT cartel” of vendors. … Kundra, who is leaving his job in mid-August, offered a kaleidoscopic view of his concerns about federal IT in an appearance before President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. In particular, Kundra is worried about the “mosaic effect,” the unintended consequence of government data sharing, where data sets are combined and layered in ways that can strip away privacy and pose security threats.

For full text of article, visit Outgoing federal CIO warns of ‘an IT cartel’ – Computerworld.

Practical guidelines for open data licensing have been published in the United Kingdom

Thanks to Kevin Pomfret for passing along the following link:

by Katleen Janssen, EPSI Platform, 27 May 2011

Naomi Korn and Charles Oppenheim have prepared a Practical Guide for Licensing Open Data, targeting organisations that want to use open data and want to understand under which terms they can use data licensed by third parties. The Guide relies on work done by the Strategic Content Alliance and JISC projects related to digital content, including Web2Rights. The Guide provides short information on some of the most important legal domains that need to be taken into account when licensing open data (intellectual property rights, contract law, data protection, freedom of information, and breach of confidence). It explains the commonly known open licence models…

For full text of the article, click Licensing Open Data: A Practical Guide at EPSI Platform.

Why OpenStreetMap is moving from Creative Commons to the Open Database License

by Audrey Watters, O’Reilly Radar, June 16, 2011

… When OpenStreetMap launched, contributions to the project were licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution/ShareAlike license. That meant that anyone could copy OSM data, but if it was incorporated into another project, those same terms and conditions applied (ShareAlike) and the copyright owner had to be credited (Attribution). … After much discussion with lawyers and with the community, OpenStreetMap opted to make the move to the Open Database License (ODbL), arguing it was more suited to OSM’s purposes. I recently asked OSM founder Steve Coast about the decision and the process of making the switch. …

Full text of the article via Choosing the right license for open data – O’Reilly Radar.

San Francisco Passes First Open Data Law

Flag of the city of San Francisco, California

Image via Wikipedia

Source: E.B. Boyd, Fast Company, November 9, 2010

One year ago, San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom issued an executive order directing the city’s departments to make their data public. Yesterday, the city’s board of supervisors turned that order into law. As far as we could establish, this is the first time any city in the U.S. has implemented an open data law. But given that other jurisdictions often follow San Francisco’s lead in this space, it’s likely not the last. The law is brief. It simply says city’s departments and agencies “shall make reasonable efforts” to publish any data under their control — provided that doing so does not violate other laws, particularly those related to privacy. The Board of Supervisors passed the ordinance unanimously. …

For full text of the article, click here.

 

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