Tag Archive | Open Data

Digital Fuel of the 21st Century: Innovation through Open Data and the Network Effect

English: Vivek Kundra - United States Chief In...

The Information Revolution by Jenny Li Fowler, Harvard Kennedy School, January 20, 2012

… In a new Shorenstein Center discussion paper titled “Digital Fuel of the 21st Century: Innovation through Open Data and the Network Effect,” [Viveck] Kundra[, who served as Chief Information Officer for the Obama Administration (2008-11),] makes four specific recommendations to ensure our society continues to build on and benefit from the power of open data and the so-called “network effect” …

  • Citizens and NGOs must demand open data in order to fight government corruption, improve accountability and government services.
  • Governments must enact legislation to change the default setting of government to be open, transparent and participatory.
  • The press must harness the power of the network effect through strategic partnerships and crowdsourcing to cut costs and provide better insights.
  • Venture capitalists should invest in startups focused on building companies based on public sector data

For the full text of this article and a link to Kundra’s paper, visit Harvard Kennedy School – The Information Revolution.

Advertisements

Jack Dangermond on Improving Government Transparency and Accountability

by Jack Dangermond, ESRI Insider, October 14, 2011

Born out of the Gov 2.0 movement, the terms transparency and accountability have become part of the daily vernacular of governments and the citizens they serve. One might even suggest these words have become a new expectation of governing. Transparency and accountability began with a simple concept of openly communicating public policy to the taxpayer. Today, these concepts are thriving within a growing emphasis on developing an interactive dialog between governments and the people. Maps can be a very valuable part of transparency in government. …

For full text of the article, visit Esri Insider : Improving Government Transparency and Accountability.

Tech@State: Data Visualization

The next Tech@State, scheduled for Sept 23-24, will feature new innovative and fascinating data visualization techniques. The event will also be streamed live on the Internet.

Agenda for Data Visualization

DAY 1:

8:00 AM – Doors Open

8:50 – 9:00 AM – Introduction, Suzanne Hall – Senior Advisor for Innovation, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs

9:00 – 9:15 AM – Welcome, Dr Kerri-Ann Jones, Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs

9:15 – 10:15 AM – Keynote Address – ‘Policy and Technology’ Edward Tufte

10:15 – 10:30 AM – Coffee Break

10:30 – 11:25 AM – Panel on ‘Development Challenge: Open Data to Making Sense of Data’

11:25 AM – 12:20 PM – Panel on ‘Latest Trends in Data Visualization’

12:20 – 12:30 PM – Showing of ‘Connected’ Trailer & Declaration of Interdependence Project

12:30 – 1:30 PM – Lunch

— Afternoon Breakouts —

1:30 – 3:00 PM

Session A

1.  Supporting Disaster Response and Coordination – Panelists Bios & Photos

2.  Visualizations for Aid Transparency and Management – Panelists Bios & Photos

3.  Best Practices for Visualization Interoperability – Panelist Bios & Photos

4.  State Department and USAID Data Visualization Projects – Panelist Bios & Photos

3:00 – 3:30 PM – Coffee Break

3:30 – 5:00 PM

Session B

1.  Using Climate and Health Data to Monitor Food Insecure Areas – Panelist Bios & Photos

2.  Mobile Technology and New Media:  Trends and Opportunities – Panelist Bios & Photos

3.  Turning Information into Insight – Panelist Bios & Photos

4.  New Ways to Visualize Development Data – Panelist Bios & Photos

 

 

World Bank Webcast: Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open Solutions: Possibilities and Pitfalls

Open Data, Open Knowledge, Open Solutions: Possibilities and Pitfalls

Thursday, September 22, 2011; 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Watch Live from the World Bank Annual Meetings in Washington, DC! As part of the World Bank’s 2011 Annual Meetings and Civil Society Forum, The World Bank will host a discussion with leading members of the civil society, open government, open development communities to discuss a new “Open Development Agenda,” in which individuals are empowered to create better solutions for development issues. The session will begin with an overview of Open Development, its implications for development partners, and how this move toward greater openness in data and knowledge is changing the entire development paradigm. It will include a lively moderated conversation on the opportunities presented by open data, open knowledge, and open solutions and how these relate to development challenges and aid effectiveness. Topics will include: What are the potential limitations of “open”? How can we draw on knowledge, learning, and innovation from a much wider pool of “solvers” and donor resources? Participants will also have an opportunity to see new mobile apps and the updated Mapping for Results portal. The session will close with an open dialogue, where participants will have an opportunity to present their ideas and feedback on the changing roles of the private sector, civil society organizations, and governments in making development more effective.

Open Government and the National Plan | The White House

….the United States will produce a plan that builds on existing initiatives and practices. The plan will be released when the Open Government Partnership is formally launched on the margins of the U.N. General Assembly in New York City in September.

As part of the Open Government Initiative, we have benefited from knowledgeable and constructive input from external stakeholders with strong commitments to the principles of open government. The list is long and continues to grow.

We have initiated consultations about the Open Government Plan, beginning with a number of meetings with key external stakeholders, and our consultation is now moving to a new phase in which we seek ideas through this platform, in response to specific questions that we raise through a series of blog posts. We will have a final meeting with stakeholders as we finalize our plan.

Today, we are asking for your thoughts on ideas related to two of the key challenges – improving public services and increasing public integrity:

  • How can regulations.gov, one of the primary mechanisms for government transparency and public participation, be made more useful to the public rulemaking process? OMB is beginning the process of reviewing and potentially updating its Federal Web Policy.
  • What policy updates should be included in this revision to make Federal websites more user-friendly and pertinent to the needs of the public? How can we build on the success of Data.Gov and encourage the use of democratized data to build new consumer-oriented products and services?

Please think about these questions and send your thoughts to opengov@ostp.gov. We will post a summary of your submissions online in the future. Your ideas will be carefully considered as we produce our National Plan and continue to engage with you over the next month in future posts on this blog. Aneesh Chopra is the U.S. Chief Technology Officer and Cass Sunstein is the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs

For full text of the article, visit Open Government and the National Plan | The White House.

Practical guidelines for open data licensing have been published in the United Kingdom

Thanks to Kevin Pomfret for passing along the following link:

by Katleen Janssen, EPSI Platform, 27 May 2011

Naomi Korn and Charles Oppenheim have prepared a Practical Guide for Licensing Open Data, targeting organisations that want to use open data and want to understand under which terms they can use data licensed by third parties. The Guide relies on work done by the Strategic Content Alliance and JISC projects related to digital content, including Web2Rights. The Guide provides short information on some of the most important legal domains that need to be taken into account when licensing open data (intellectual property rights, contract law, data protection, freedom of information, and breach of confidence). It explains the commonly known open licence models…

For full text of the article, click Licensing Open Data: A Practical Guide at EPSI Platform.

Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism

by Nancy Scola, Tech President, June 3, 2011 – 4:35pm

Every time something happens in the world these days, somebody makes a map about it.We saw it with last January’s devastating earthquake in Haiti, the rollout of the U.S.’s long-awaited National Broadband Map in February, the personalized maps that accompanied April’s iPhone tracking story. We see it every election. And with the increasing availability of free and open-source or simply cheap mapping tools, and the growing footprint of the open data movement, democratized mapping is likely only getting started. …

via Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism | techPresident.

%d bloggers like this: