Tag Archive | neogeography

Zero Geography: Situating Neogeography

Situating Neogeography: Special Issue of Environment and Planning A

The special issue of Environment and Planning A on neogeography that Mark Graham edited with Matthew Wilson is now out an available to download. It will undoubtedly be a useful collection for anyone interested in thinking about the coming-togethers of information, the internet, and place.

For table of contents and links visit Zero Geography: Situating Neogeography: Special Issue of Environment and Planning A.

 

Neogeography and the delusion of democratisation

by Muki Haklay, Po Ve Sham Blog,  22 June, 2012

“At the end of 2010, Matt Wilson (University of Kentucky) and Mark Graham(Oxford Internet Institute), started coordinating a special issue of Environment and Planning Adedicated to ‘Situating Neogeography’, asking ‘How might we situate neogeography? What are the various assemblages, networks, ecologies, configurations, discourses, cyborgs, alliances that enable/enact these technologies?’ My [Muki Hakly’s] response to this call is a paper titled ‘Neogeography and the delusion of democratisation’ and it is finally been accepted for publication. I am providing below an excerpt from the introduction, to provide a flavour of the discussion:

“Since the emergence of the World Wide Web (Web) in the early 1990s, claims about its democratic potential and practice are a persistent feature in the discourse about it. While awareness of the potential of ‘anyone, anytime, anywhere’ to access and use information was extolled for a long while (for an early example see Batty 1997), the emergence of Web 2.0 in the mid-2000s (O’Reilly 2005) increased this notion. In the popular writing of authors such as Friedman (2006), these sentiments are amplified by highlighting the ability of anyone to ‘plug into the flat earth platform’ from anywhere and anytime. …”

For full text of this thought provoking article, visit Neogeography and the delusion of democratisation « Po Ve Sham – Muki Haklay’s personal blog.

Crowd and Crown: Social Media and Mapping for International Crisis Response

Crowd and Crown:Policy Issues in Social Media and Mapping

for International Crisis Response 

Crowdsourcing and crisis mapping have opened new approaches to making sense of crises. Yet these new technologies raise unanswered questions. When a refugee tweets her location with a request for help, is she still safe? How do we know that the content of the message is from a refugee at all? And do we have a responsibility to act on that request for aid? Developing policies that connect the crowd to the large, traditional institutions that respond to emergencies will require asking these questions and developing some initial (and imperfect) answers.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011
3:00-4:30pm

6th Floor Moynihan Board Room
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center
One Woodrow Wilson Plaza
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20004

This meeting is free and open to the public. Allow time for routine security procedures. A photo ID is required for entry.

The Woodrow Wilson Center is located in the Ronald Reagan Building (Federal Triangle stop on Blue/Orange Line, or down the street from Metro Center stop on the Red Line). Public parking is available underneath the Reagan Building; however we recommend metro or taxi. www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

About John Crowley, Research Fellow, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative John Crowley is a research fellow at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and an analyst (contract) with the STAR-TIDES initiative at the National Defense University. He was the lead author of the recent UN Foundation study, Disaster Relief 2.0. He also leads a community of software developers that convene at Camp Roberts to work on the difficult inter-organizational issues that emerge from crowdsourcing and crisis mapping. He holds degrees in public policy, history, and music from Harvard and Boston University, and was the 2008 Robert C. Seamans Fellow in Science, Technology, and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He tweets at @jcrowley.

The Wilson Center’s Science and Technology Innovation Program (STIP)focuses on emerging technologies and the critical choices innovation presents to public policy. Our work ranges from nanotechnology, geoengineering, and synthetic biology to serious games, participatory technology assessment, transformative social media, and geospatial technology.

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is the living, national memorial to President Wilson established by Congress in 1968 and headquartered in Washington, D.C. The Center establishes and maintains a neutral forum for free, open, and informed dialogue. It is a nonpartisan institution, supported by public and private funds and engaged in the study of national and international affairs.

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