Tag Archive | National Science Foundation

Spatial Computing 2020 Report Released

This one-and-a-half-day NSF/CCC sponsored visioning workshop on Spatial Computing outlined an effort to develop and promote a unified agenda for Spatial Computing research and development across US agencies, industries, and universities (Report PDF).

The workshop identified (1) fundamental research questions for individual computing disciplines and (2) cross-cutting research questions requiring novel, multi-disciplinary solutions. The workshop included US leaders in academia and the public sector. Results of this workshop were presented to the NSF in order to inform possible funding initiatives.

The workshop included presentations from invited thought-leaders and agency representatives, brainstorming, and interactive demos and focus group sessions with spatial computing professionals.

Workshop agenda and participant list

Download the report (pdf) here:
http://cra.org/ccc/files/docs/Spatial_Computing_Report-2013.pdf

 

 

Administration Efforts to Address Big Data Science and Engineering

October 24, 2012

Suzanne Iacono, deputy assistant director of the National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering will be featured on an InformationWeek Government Webcast, “Act on Big Data,” on Thursday, Oct. 25, 2012 at 2 p.m. ET.

Iacono, who also serves as vice chair of the Big Data Senior Steering Group of the interagency Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program, will be part of a panel of experts during the webcast. In that role she will provide an update on the Obama administration’s Big Data Initiative.

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NSF Issues IGERT Solicitation Focused on Big Data

Logo of the National Science Foundation (NSF)....

Logo of the National Science Foundation (NSF). For NSF logo information visit: http://www.nsf.gov/policies/logos.jsp (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

by Erwin Gianchandi, the Computing Community Consortium blog, April 23, 2012

The National Science Foundation (NSF) last week issued a new solicitation under its Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) program, providing a specific track for training the next generation of researchers in computational and data-enabled science and engineering. The solicitation is part of the Foundation’s (and Administration’s) Big Data Initiative, which was announced last month.

According to the new solicitation (emphasis added):

“Building upon the IGERT platform, the purpose of this IGERT solicitation is to support new models in graduate education in which students are engaged in an environment that supports innovation to learn through hands-on experience how their own research may contribute in new ways to benefit society and to learn the processes for the successful implementation of such contributions.

Within the Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CIF21) and IGERT, NSF recognizes the need to educate and support a next generation of researchers able to address fundamental challenges in 1) core techniques and technologies for advancing big data science and engineering; 2) analyzing and dealing with challenging computational and data enabled science and engineering (CDS&E) problems, and 3) researching, providing, and using the cyberinfrastructure that makes cutting-edge CDS&E research possible in any and all disciplines.

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White House ‘Big Data’ Push Means Big Bucks for Drone Brains

White House ‘Big Data’ Push Means Big Bucks for Drone Brains

By Robert Beckhusen, Danger Room, Wired Magazine, March 29, 2012

The military has a data problem. More specifically, it has a too-much-data problem. Analysts have to sort through massive amounts of information collected by orbiting surveillance drones and satellites, or finding the data trails left behind by spies inside defense networks. Sorting through all this data is also necessary for making unmanned vehicles more autonomous. Bring on the White House’s new “big data” research initiative. Announced this morning, the plan aims to invest “more than $200 million” in six government agencies to develop systems to “extract knowledge and insights from large and complex collections of digital data,” according to a White House statement. …

For full text of the article, via White House ‘Big Data’ Push Means Big Bucks for Drone Brains | Danger Room | Wired.com.

President’s FY13 Budget Release Info Posted for DOE, NOAA, NSF

The American Association for the Advancement of Science has posted FY13 Budget Release Information for DOE, NOAA, and NSF. The President’s Budget for FY 2013 will be released on February 13. As in prior years, we will be posting schedule information for agency budget briefings to the R&D Budget and Policy Program website. Initial information for the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been posted; others will follow soon. Please check back frequently for the most up-to-date information.


Video: Michael Goodchild discusses using social networks to define landscapes. – US National Science Foundation (NSF)

Director of the University of California, Santa Barbara’s Center for Spatial Studies Michael Goodchild discusses “From Community Mapping to Critical Spatial Thinking: The Changing Face of GIS (geographic information systems)” in this National Science Foundation Distinguished Lecture. He discusses how individuals are using distributed, real-time data enabled by social networks to define landscapes that have been suddenly altered by floods, hurricanes and other acts of nature.

To watch video, visit: nsf.gov – News – Video – Michael Goodchild discusses using social networks to define landscapes. – US National Science Foundation (NSF).

Federal Research and Development in the FY 2011 Budget Compromise

On Monday, April 11, the U.S. House of Representatives introduced the bill to fund the federal government for the last half of FY 2011. This bill will be taken up in the House on April 13th and in the Senate on April 14th, and then sent to the President for his signature, hopefully before the midnight deadline on Friday, April 15th. If passed, non-defense funding levels will be reduced by a 0.2 percent across-the-board cut to achieve savings of approximately $1.1 billion. Specific details on programmatic cuts for Federal R&D can be found in the articles blow:

Text of the Legislation:

A summary of the legislation:

 

R&D in the FY 2011 Compromise

by Patrick Clemins, Ph.D., AAAS R&D Budget and Policy Program, April 13, 2011

Congress released their year-long continuing resolution for FY 2011 this morning which contains a total of around $38.5 billion in cuts, the largest collection of spending cuts in history. R&D intensive programs and agencies were spared the worst of the cuts. Basic research programs faired the best, while applied research programs, especially at the Department of Energy did less well, accurately reflecting the current policy debates taking place. Basic research generally has broad, bi-partisan support, but there is discussion as to how much the federal government should be involved in applied research and the role of industry in funding the applied research stage of the innovation pipeline.

For full text of the article and other related resources, visit: http://www.aaas.org/spp/rd/

 

FYI #48: Details of Final FY 2011 Appropriations Bill Emerging

By Richard Jones, American Institute of Physics

Total FY 2011 funding will be $78.5 billion less than that requested by the Obama Administration. … A release from the Senate Appropriations Committee states, “as these cuts must be implemented in just the remaining six months of the fiscal year, their impact will be especially painful in some instances.” The below figures, provided by the House Appropriations Committee, do not include the 0.2 percent across the board cut that was made to all non-defense accounts.  In all instances, reductions from current FY 2010 levels are shown, and the numbers are rounded.  It should also be noted that the House Appropriations statement explains: “This list contains highlighted program cuts. This list is not comprehensive of all program funding levels in the legislation.”

National Science Foundation
Research and Related Activities: Down $43 million
Education and Human Resources: Down $10 million

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Education: Down $38 million
Cross Agency Support: Down $83 million

U.S. Geological Survey: Down $26 million

For full text of the article, visit: http://www.aip.org/fyi/2011/048.html

Measuring the Impacts of Federal Investments in Research and Development

Measuring the Impacts of Federal Investments in Research: A Workshop

Monday-Tuesday, April 18-19, 2011

20 F Street (NW) Conference Center

Washington, D.C. 20001

A committee formed under the auspices of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) and Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP) is holding a two-day workshop to identify analytical and data needs and opportunities in assessing the returns to federal research funding across a wide range of fields and government missions.   The meeting is targeted for:

  • Federal agency research evaluators
  • Congressional staff with research jurisdictions
  • Science funding advocates
  • Science of science policy scholars
  • Other academics

Questions to be discussed include:

What have we learned from previous efforts to measure the economic and noneconomic benefits of federal research investments?

What are the links between health research and health outcomes and costs?

Can we measure the impact of research on non-market values such as climate change mitigation, food security, environmental protection, and national security?

What progress has been made in constructing a long-term data infrastructure for measuring research impacts? Can approaches such as STAR Metrics be broadened to encompass different performers and funding mechanisms?

What methods and metrics are being used in Europe, Latin America, and elsewhere?

What metrics and data are needed to track career choices and career development of STEM graduates trained with research funds?

How might we assess the influence of research on formal (e.g., regulatory, judicial) and informal (e.g., consumer, patient) decision-making?

For more information and to register for the workshop, via Returns on Federal R&D.

Details of the Bipartisan Budget Deal | The White House

Posted by Dan Pfeiffer on April 09, 2011 at 06:44 PM EDT

Last night, President Obama announced that the federal government will remain open for business because Americans from different beliefs came together, put politics aside, and met the expectations of the American people. … This deal cuts spending by $78.5 billion from the President’s FY 2011 Budget request — the largest annual spending cut in our history. …Even though we will no longer double the funding of key research and development agencies, you will still see strong investments in National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Science Foundation and the Office of Science. …

For full text of the article, visit: Details of the Bipartisan Budget Deal | The White House.

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