Tag Archive | National Institute of Standards and Technology

Federal Research and Development in the FY 2011 Budget Compromise

On Monday, April 11, the U.S. House of Representatives introduced the bill to fund the federal government for the last half of FY 2011. This bill will be taken up in the House on April 13th and in the Senate on April 14th, and then sent to the President for his signature, hopefully before the midnight deadline on Friday, April 15th. If passed, non-defense funding levels will be reduced by a 0.2 percent across-the-board cut to achieve savings of approximately $1.1 billion. Specific details on programmatic cuts for Federal R&D can be found in the articles blow:

Text of the Legislation:

A summary of the legislation:

 

R&D in the FY 2011 Compromise

by Patrick Clemins, Ph.D., AAAS R&D Budget and Policy Program, April 13, 2011

Congress released their year-long continuing resolution for FY 2011 this morning which contains a total of around $38.5 billion in cuts, the largest collection of spending cuts in history. R&D intensive programs and agencies were spared the worst of the cuts. Basic research programs faired the best, while applied research programs, especially at the Department of Energy did less well, accurately reflecting the current policy debates taking place. Basic research generally has broad, bi-partisan support, but there is discussion as to how much the federal government should be involved in applied research and the role of industry in funding the applied research stage of the innovation pipeline.

For full text of the article and other related resources, visit: http://www.aaas.org/spp/rd/

 

FYI #48: Details of Final FY 2011 Appropriations Bill Emerging

By Richard Jones, American Institute of Physics

Total FY 2011 funding will be $78.5 billion less than that requested by the Obama Administration. … A release from the Senate Appropriations Committee states, “as these cuts must be implemented in just the remaining six months of the fiscal year, their impact will be especially painful in some instances.” The below figures, provided by the House Appropriations Committee, do not include the 0.2 percent across the board cut that was made to all non-defense accounts.  In all instances, reductions from current FY 2010 levels are shown, and the numbers are rounded.  It should also be noted that the House Appropriations statement explains: “This list contains highlighted program cuts. This list is not comprehensive of all program funding levels in the legislation.”

National Science Foundation
Research and Related Activities: Down $43 million
Education and Human Resources: Down $10 million

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Education: Down $38 million
Cross Agency Support: Down $83 million

U.S. Geological Survey: Down $26 million

For full text of the article, visit: http://www.aip.org/fyi/2011/048.html

Details of the Bipartisan Budget Deal | The White House

Posted by Dan Pfeiffer on April 09, 2011 at 06:44 PM EDT

Last night, President Obama announced that the federal government will remain open for business because Americans from different beliefs came together, put politics aside, and met the expectations of the American people. … This deal cuts spending by $78.5 billion from the President’s FY 2011 Budget request — the largest annual spending cut in our history. …Even though we will no longer double the funding of key research and development agencies, you will still see strong investments in National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Science Foundation and the Office of Science. …

For full text of the article, visit: Details of the Bipartisan Budget Deal | The White House.

Senate Hearing on Investing in Federal R and D

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation announces the following Science and Space Subcommittee hearing on investing in federal R&D.

Mar 17, 2011, at 10:30 AM, Russell Senate Office Building Room 253, Washington, DC

Witness Panel 1

NIST Issues Guidance on Cloud Computing Privacy and Security Requirements for Federal Agencies

 

NIST Issues Guidance on Cloud Computing Privacy and Security Requirements for Federal Agencies

Posted on February 17, 2011 by HL Chronicle of Data Protection, Joel Buckman, an associate in Hogan Lovells Privacy and Information Management practice group located in the Washington, D.C office, assisted in the preparation of this entry.

Recent guidance from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”) encourages federal agencies to take advantage of cloud computing. It also provides draft security and privacy guidelines for federal agencies to follow when engaging cloud providers. The draft guidelines serve as roadmaps for how to negotiate meaningful privacy and data security protections from cloud providers. Though prepared for federal agencies, the draft guidelines could prove influential to the private sector as an increasing number of private businesses use cloud services. NIST has requested comments on the drafts by no later than February 28, 2011. …

For full text of the article, visit NIST Issues Guidance on Cloud Computing Privacy and Security Requirements for Federal Agencies : HL Chronicle of Data Protection.

House Republicans Propose New FY 2011 S&T Budgets

FYI#15, API Bulletin of Science Policy News, Richard Jones, February 10, 2011

Next week the House of Representatives may vote on a funding bill that would make significant changes in some S&T agency budgets. Under an initial version of this bill:

* The budget for the Department of Energy’s Office of Science would be reduced by 18.0 percent or $882.3 million from the current level.

* Funding for the National Institute of Standards and Technology would be cut by 14.4 percent or $123.7 million.

* NASA’s budget would remain essentially level, declining 0.6 percent or $103 million.

* The budget for the U.S. Geological Survey would also remain level, declining 0.5 percent or $5.3 million.

* The National Science Foundation’s budget would increase 6.0 percent or $412.9 million.

These changes were in a list of seventy proposed budget recommendations released yesterday by the House Appropriations Committee that were projected to total $74 billion. Additional budget cuts will be made in the bill before it goes to the full House. Chairman Rogers just announced that these cuts will total $100 billion from what President Obama requested. That forthcoming bill – a continuing resolution or CR – would provide funding after an existing short-term bill expires on March 4.

via House Republicans Propose New FY 2011 S&T Budgets.

Revised list of cuts would bite deeper into US research

Hal Rogers

Image via Wikipedia

Revised list of cuts would bite deeper into US research

Great Beyond, Nature, February 11, 2011

NASA, NIH, NIST and the NSF all fared worse than they did earlier in the week. The revised list was anticipated after previous cuts failed to impress Republican caucus members, including so-called “tea party” members, who have been pressuring House leaders to make good on a campaign promise to trim $100 billion from President Barack Obama’s 2011 budget request. Yesterday, the committee, which is chaired by Republican congressman Hal Rogers (pictured) of Kentucky, acknowledged that new and deeper cuts would be unveiled as part of the package that representatives will be asked to vote on next week. … The text of the legislation seems to remove any uncertainy as to whether Republican leaders would try to water down their promise of draconian spending measures. It also sets the stage for a tough battle on Capitol Hill. The US government is currently funded under the latest in a series of continuing resolutions that maintains funding at 2010 levels from the beginning of the 2011 fiscal year on 1 October, 2010, to 4 March, 2011. The new proposals will be debated on the House floor next week and are still subject to confirmation by the Senate and President Barack Obama. …

For full text of the article, visit  The Great Beyond: Revised list of cuts would bite deeper into US research.

Data Access and Privacy Issues Related to Smart Grid Technologies

 

DATA ACCESS AND PRIVACY ISSUES RELATED TO SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES

Department of Energy, October 5, 2010

This section summarizes and records DOE‘s impressions of the results of its efforts to collect and analyze diverse perspectives on the current state of data security and consumer access and privacy issues associated with the ongoing development and deployment of ―Smart Grid technologies. In so doing, it provides federal, state and local policymakers, as well as utilities and third-party providers of energy management services, with a concise, broad overview of the current state of ongoing efforts to assess the legal and regulatory implications of the data-security and data-privacy issues that were identified during a public information-gathering process conducted by DOE in the spring and summer of 2010. In this document, DOE attempts to provide a measure of certainty for all Smart Grid participants on issues where there is consensus, as well as highlight the pros and cons of various approaches where debate still exists.
 
DOE stresses the intended audience and the legal and regulatory focus of this report because efforts to encourage the deployment of Smart Grid technologies will depend significantly upon two factors.  First, the success of such efforts depends upon the development of legal and regulatory regimes that respect consumer privacy, promote consumer access to and choice regarding third-party use of their energy data, and secure potentially sensitive data to increase consumer acceptance of Smart Grid.  Second, the success of such efforts also depends upon the development of appropriate technical standards and protocols for promoting privacy, choice, and the secure, interoperable transfer and maintenance of sensitive data. 
 
 This report focuses on the first of these challenges. Federal efforts to investigate the second set of technical issues and promote the development of standards for addressing them are also underway. Those seeking analyses of the technical issues should consult publications like the  Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security: Vol. 2, Privacy and the Smart Grid, released by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in August 2010.
For full text of the report, click here.
 
For a related posting on the  Geodata Policy blog, click here.
 
 

 

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