Tag Archive | Mobile phone

FCC, FEMA offer new tech tips for emergencies – CNN.com

By Amy Gahran, Special to CNN, September 22, 2011

(CNN) — In an emergency, do you know how to best use your cell phone to stay safe, informed and in touch? Recognizing that Americans have been getting mixed messages from many sources, this week the Federal Communication Commission and the Federal Emergency Management Administration teamed up to publish a new list of tips for communicating before, during and after a disaster. … For full text of the article, visit FCC, FEMA offer new tech tips for emergencies – CNN.com

FCC, FTC Location Based Services (and Privacy) Forum on Tuesday, June 28th

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Location Based Services Forum

June 28, 2011 / 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM EDT / FCC, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554

The FCC’s Wireless Telecommunications Bureau in consultation with Federal Trade Commission staff will hold a public education forum featuring representatives of telecommunications carriers, technology companies, consumer advocacy groups and academia on June 28, 2011, exploring how consumers can be both smart and secure when realizing the benefits of Location Based Services (LBS). Topics will include: how LBS works; benefits and risks of LBS; consumer DOs and DON’Ts; industry best practices; and what parents should know about location tracking when their children use mobile devices. See the Public Notice for more information.

Audio/video coverage of the meeting will be broadcast live with open captioning over the Internet from the FCC’s web page at www.fcc.gov/live.  The FCC’s webcast is free to the public.  Those who watch the live video stream of the event may email event-related questions to livequestions@fcc.gov.  Depending on the volume of questions and time constraints, the panel moderators will work to respond to as many questions as possible during the workshop.

How Social Media is Changing Disaster Response – TIME

By Erin SkardaTime online, June 09, 2011

…With cell-phone service largely unavailable and a distance of several thousand miles between her house in Amsterdam, N.Y., and Joplin, Williamson-Smith posted photos of James on several Facebook pages that were created in the aftermath of the tornado. Less than 24 hours later, she saw a comment on a page called “Joplin Tornado Citizen Checks” that said James had been found and was volunteering with search-and-rescue teams. “Even though at that point we hadn’t spoken to him directly, it was comforting to know that someone out there had seen him and that he was O.K.,” says Williamson-Smith. …

For full text of the article visist Facebook to the Rescue! How Social Media is Changing Disaster Response – TIME.

Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism

by Nancy Scola, Tech President, June 3, 2011 – 4:35pm

Every time something happens in the world these days, somebody makes a map about it.We saw it with last January’s devastating earthquake in Haiti, the rollout of the U.S.’s long-awaited National Broadband Map in February, the personalized maps that accompanied April’s iPhone tracking story. We see it every election. And with the increasing availability of free and open-source or simply cheap mapping tools, and the growing footprint of the open data movement, democratized mapping is likely only getting started. …

via Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism | techPresident.

Bill Would Keep Big Brother’s Mitts Off Your GPS Data

…The courts aren’t sure whether so-called “geolocation” data taken from GPS devices or cellphones is covered by the Fourth Amendment, as Wired.com’s blog Threat Level has extensively reported. That ambiguity has largely enabled law enforcement to snatch it up without getting a warrant or showing probable cause. Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat, and Rep. Jason Chaffetz, a Republican, want to make things crystal clear: no warrant, no geolocation info. …

Full text of the article, via Bill Would Keep Big Brother’s Mitts Off Your GPS Data | Danger Room | Wired.com.

Executive Counsel » Lawmakers Eye Geolocation Apps

by Kevin D. Pomfret, LeClairRyan, Executive Counsel Magazine, April/May 2011

Geolocation technology enables devices like smart phones to collect data “about where people go and what they do,” the author explains. “This information can be aggregated with other information to determine ‘who they are’ with precision and accuracy.” Geolocation technology raises concerns in part because significant benefits of the technology often are overshadowed by sensationalized media accounts of real or perceived privacy breeches, according to the author.

For full text of the summary, visit Executive Counsel » Lawmakers Eye Geolocation Apps. For full text of the article, you will need to subscribe to Executive Counsel or purchase this month’s magazine.

Google’s Eric Schmidt on Tracking Mobile Phone Locations

From Politico Playbook, May 15, 2011

FIRST LOOK – Google’s Eric Schmidt, on CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS” today: “Today, your phone knows who you are, where you are, where you’re going, to some degree, because it can see your path. And with that and with your permission, it’s possible for software and software developers to predict where you’re going to go, to suggest people you should meet, to suggest activities and so forth. So ultimately what happens is, the mobile phone does what it does best, which is remember everything and make suggestions. And then you can be just a better human and have a good time.  …”

Full text via Politico Playbook and CNN Global Public Square.

PBS Video: Crisis mappers: Mobile technology helps disaster victims worldwide

PBS, May 13, 2011

There are now 6.8 billion people on the planet. And about 5 billion cell phones. This extraordinary ability to connect has turned a modern convenience into a lifeline through a system called crisis mapping. It first gained prominence after the earthquake in Haiti, when people used their cell phones to send text messages to a centralized response team. Since then, crisis mapping has been used to help victims in emergency zones following the tornadoes in the Midwest, the earthquake in Japan and the unrest in the Middle East. Today, there are hundreds of volunteers in more than 50 countries creating maps of crises around the world, using a system that incorporates the lessons learned in Haiti. Alison Stewart reports on this worldwide network of volunteers – regular people — using a breakthrough technology to help others.

For link to video, visit Video: Crisis mappers: Mobile technology helps disaster victims worldwide | Need to Know.

Mobile Security Risks: A Primer for Activists, Journalists and Rights Defenders

Posted by SaferMobile onMobileActive,  May 10, 2011

Activists, rights defenders, and journalists use mobile devices and communications for reporting, organizing, mobilizing, and documenting.  Mobiles provide countless benefits — relatively low cost, increased efficiencies, vast reach — but they also present specific risks to rights defenders and activists. Additionally, information about other mobile uses, such as your photos or video, your data, the Internet sites you visit from your phone, and your physical location, are stored on your device and often logged by your mobile network. How much is this putting you at risk?  This Overview will help you evaluate your level of risk in regard to your mobile communications

For full text of the article, visit Mobile Security Risks: A Primer for Activists, Journalists and Rights Defenders | MobileActive.org.

Cellphones to Get an Emergency Alert System

by Edward Wyatt, NYT, May 9, 2011

WASHINGTON — The emergency broadcast system is coming to cellphones. Updating the national emergency alert system, federal officials planned to announce on Tuesday in Manhattan that some cellphone users in New York and Washington will soon be able to receive alerts by text message in the event of a national or regional emergency. …  Text messages will be sent to customers of participating cellphone companies who are in an area affected by the emergency. Users can opt out of any of the alerts except the presidential messages. …

Full text of the article via Cellphones to Get an Emergency Alert System – NYTimes.com.

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