Tag Archive | Marine Spatial Planning

FY 2012 Appropriation for U.S. Geological Survey

Total USGS appropriations:

The FY 2011 appropriation was $1,083.7 million
The FY 2012 Administration request was $1,117.9 million
The FY 2012 appropriation is $1,069.7 million, a decline of $14.0 million or 1.3 percent.

For a breakdown of the appropriations by USGS programs under Surveys, Investigations and Research, visit the AIP FYI blog: FY 2012 Appropriation for U.S. Geological Survey.

Of note, the appropriations report states:

Land Use Change and Land Imaging

“Within Land Use Change, an increase of $11,500,000 is provided to complete funding for Landsat 8 ground operations development. The conferees have not agreed with the proposal to create a separate ‘Land Imaging’ account and have instead maintained funding for all satellite operations within this subactivity. Estimated administrative savings assumed in the proposed new account have been assumed within the Land Use Change account instead.

“The conferees have not agreed to transfer budgetary authority for the launch of Landsat satellites 9 and 10 from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to the Survey. Of the requested $48,000,000 increase for its implementation, the conferees have provided $2,000,000 for program development only. The conferees note that future requests for the project are estimated by the Administration to escalate to over $400,000,000 by fiscal year 2014. There is little doubt that resources will not be available within the Interior Appropriations bill to support these very large increases without decimating all other Survey programs. The conferees note that the launch of Landsat 9 is not scheduled until 2018. This allows time in the year ahead for all interested parties to re-examine how to proceed with future Landsat missions. In the conferees’ view this would be a prudent step, inasmuch as the current budget proposal is based on a report from the Office of Science and Technology Policy issued in 2008, and both technological advances and a vastly different economic environment may point to other, less costly, options for obtaining Landsat data.”

National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program and National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Federal and State Partnerships

“Increases to the request include $998,000 for the National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program to continue funding at the current year enacted level, and $1,500,000 for National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Federal and State Partnerships to partially restore the proposed reduction to that program. Decreases from the request include $500,000 from WaterSMART.”

Natural Hazards and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning

“The conferees have not agreed to proposed reductions in the request and have restored funds to the following programs: $2,000,000 for Earthquake Grants; $1,800,000 for the 2012 Multi-Hazards Initiative; and $1,500,000 for the National Volcano Early Warning System. Decreases from the request include $800,000 from the 2011 Multi-Hazards Initiative, and $3,000,000 from Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning.”


Study on the economic effects of Marine Spatial Planning – Final Report

Study on the economic effects of Maritime Spatial Planning – Final Report

April 2011 Maritime Spatial Planning (hereafter MSP) is a tool for improved decision-making, providing a framework for arbitrating between competing human activities and managing their impact on the marine environment. Authorities and other stakeholders expect that MSP will bring substantial benefits to maritime economies and the marine environment in Europe. … Unlike cost benefit analyses, the report is mostly limited to a qualitative assessment of the benefits associated with MSP, although it also includes a methodology which has been applied to provide an indication of the quantitative effects of MSP.  …

via Study on the economic effects of Maritime Spatial Planning – Final Report – EU4Seas.

Decision Guide for Selecting Decision Support Tools for Marine Spatial Planning

This Decision Guide, produced by the Center for Ocean Solutions (COS), assists practitioners select appropriate decision support tools (DSTs) for conducting marine spatial planning in their own jurisdictions.

via Center for Ocean Solutions Decision Guide for Selecting Decision Support Tools for Marine Spatial Planning | EBM Tools Database.

National Geospatial Program and the President’s 2012 USGS Budget Proposal

The National Geospatial Program (NGP) sponsors USGS Geospatial Liaisons in every state and provides USGS Partnership funds, which are used to leverage local and state efforts to acquire new geospatial data, such as orthophotography and LiDAR. Both of these activities likely will be impacted under the FY 2012 budget, which proposes a net reduction of approximately $5.4 million (USGS FY 2012 Budget Factsheet).

 

President’s 2012 USGS Budget Proposal

USGS Press Release, Released: 2/14/2011 3:31:22 PM

The President’s proposed $1.1 billion budget for the U.S. Geological Survey in 2012 emphasizes cost-containment and program savings while investing in research and development programs to restore and protect the nation’s lands and waters for future generations.

“The USGS supports Secretary Salazar’s and the Administration’s strong commitment to use science as the cornerstone of natural resource management by providing timely, unbiased research related to our nation’s most important natural resources,” said Marcia McNutt, USGS Director. “By providing funds for the sustained operation of Earth-observing satellites and for scientific research to enable understanding of complex ecosystems, the USGS budget will help our nation meet its energy needs, protect its land, water and wildlife, and make wise decisions about natural resources.”

The 2012 budget represents an increase of $6.1 million from the 2010 enacted level, which includes net program increases of $28.8 million, administrative cost savings of $23.4 million, and fixed costs and related change increases of $710,000.

Read More…

National Ocean Policy and Marine Spatial Planning

Obama Administration officials released the Final Recommendations of the Ocean Policy Task Force on July 19, 2010, which would establish a National Policy for the Stewardship of the Ocean, Coasts, and Great Lakes (National Policy) and create a National Ocean Council (NOC) to strengthen ocean governance and coordination.  The Final Recommendations prioritize actions for the NOC to pursue, and call for a flexible framework for coastal and marine spatial planning to address conservation, economic activity, user conflict, and sustainable use of the ocean, our coasts and the Great Lakes. 

The NOC would coordinate across the Federal Government to implement the National Policy.  The Final Recommendations also call for the establishment of a Governance Coordinating Committee to formally engage with state, tribal, and local authorities.  The Final Recommendations are expected to be adopted into an Executive Order by President Obama.

President Obama recognized that our uses of the ocean are expanding at a rate that challenges our ability to manage significant and often competing demands,” said Nancy Sutley, Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality.  “With a growing number of recreational, scientific, energy, and security activities, we need a national policy that sets the United States on a new path for the conservation and sustainable use of these critical natural resources.”

On June 12, 2009, President Obama sent a memorandum to the heads of executive departments and Federal agencies establishing an Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force, led by the White House Council on Environmental Quality. The Task Force is charged with developing a recommendation for a national policy that ensures protection, maintenance, and restoration of oceans, our coasts and the Great Lakes. It will also recommend a framework for improved stewardship, and effective coastal and marine spatial planning.

In June 2009, President Obama created the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force and charged it with developing recommendations to enhance national stewardship of the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes and promote the long term conservation and use of these resources.  The Task Force was led by CEQ and included 24 senior-level policy officials from across the Federal Government.

At the President’s direction, the Task Force released an Interim Report in September 2009 and an Interim Framework for Effective Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning in December 2009.  Each of these reports was made available online for public comment.  The Task Force received and reviewed close to 5,000 written comments from Congress, stakeholders, and the public before finalizing its recommendations.  The Task Force’s Final Recommendations combine and update the proposals contained in the two earlier reports.

Source: Council on Environmental Quality, The Interagency Ocean Task Force, July 19, 2010.

%d bloggers like this: