Tag Archive | Mapmaking

Ohio Court: Geodata Intertwined with Proprietary Software Falls Outside Open Records Law

Supreme Court Rules County Engineer’s Response Met Requirements of Public Records Act

by Dennis Whalen, CNO, March 7, 2013

The Supreme Court of Ohio today denied a writ of mandamus sought by Portsmouth real estate appraiser Robert Gambill to compel the production of certain public records by Scioto County Engineer Craig Opperman.In a 6-1 per curiam opinion, the court held that Opperman met the requirements of the Ohio Public Records Act by offering to provide Gambill with a copy of the county’s electronic database containing deed information and aerial photos of all property in the county if Gambill paid the estimated $2,000 cost of separating that data from proprietary mapmaking software protected by U.S. patent laws that is “inextricably intertwined” with the data on the engineer’s computer.

For full text of the article, visit Supreme Court Rules County Engineer’s Response Met Requirements of Public Records Act.

Related Articles:

See also High Court Rules in Favor of County (Portsmouth Daily Times), Ohio Court: Geodata Intertwined with Copyright-protected Software Falls Outside Open Records Law (Directions Magazine).

Similar Cases:

Sierra Club loses on appeal in case for access to Orange County database (Directions Magazine 2011)

The WireData Case and Implications for Geospatial Data (WI State Cartographer’s Office 2008)

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Would the lack of federal government mapping be a good thing?

Thank you to Kevin Pomfret who alerted us to this article:

Written by Matt Ball, V1 Magazine, posted Friday, 08 April 2011 00:00

Trading off this week’s highly-charged political theme of a potential federal government shutdown in the United States, it’s worth discussing the implications of a lack of federal mapping. Elimination of federal mapmaking is really out of the question as the federal government needs to map for so many policy and security reasons, yet there has been a steady reduction of the role of federal mapmaking for decades. What would the implications be if there weren’t a national mapping effort at all? …

For full text of the op-ed, visit Would the lack of federal government mapping be a good thing?.

On the Media Interview: John Gravois on Making Maps, The Google Way

Making Maps, the Google Way

Earlier this year, a government official from Cambodia wrote a letter to Google, complaining about one of the company’s maps. The letter claimed that Google’s depiction of a stretch of border between Cambodia and Thailand was “devoid of truth and reality, and professionally irresponsible.” As editor John Gravois points out in Washington Monthly, 21st-century mapmaking can be politically thorny.

Source: On the Media, July 23, 2010, transcript to be available on July 26th: http://www.onthemedia.org/transcripts/2010/07/23/04

See also:

John Gravois, 2010. The Agnostic Cartographer: How Google’s Open Ended Maps are Embroiling the Company in some of the World’s Touchiest Geopolitical Disputes, Washington Monthly (July/Aug 2010).

Google’s New and Improved Map Borders – How do They Fare? Ogle Earth, July 21, 2010

India and China

Cambodia and Thailand

Azerbajjan and Armenia

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