Tag Archive | Location-based service

Three-quarters of smartphone owners use location-based services

Posted by Kathryn Zickuhr, Pew Research Center, May 11, 2012

A new report finds that 74% of smartphone owners use their phone to get real-time location-based information, and 18% use a geosocial service to “check in” to certain locations or share their location with friends. Over the past year, smartphone ownership among American adults has risen from 35% of adults in 2011 to 46% in 2012. This means that the overall proportion of U.S. adults who get location-based information has almost doubled over that time period, from 23% in May 2011 to 41% in February 2012. The percentage of adults who use geosocial services like Foursquare has likewise risen from 4% in 2011 to 10% in 2012.

For copy of the report, visit Three-quarters of smartphone owners use location-based services | Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.

Location Privacy: Who Protects?

by Catilin D. Cottril, URISA Journal 2011, Volume 23, Issue 2

Abstract: Interest in and concerns related to the issue of privacy in the location-aware environment have been growing as the availability and use of location-based services (LBS) and data have been expanding. Recent events such as “Locationgate” have brought this issue to the forefront of interest for lawmakers, application developers, agencies, and users; however, understanding the varying levels of responsibility for each has been lacking. This article attempts to provide a clear review of the methods by which privacy protection may take place at the levels of law, technology, and management so a better understanding of how a comprehensive approach to privacy protection may take place. While the majority of policy aspects reviewed are U.S.-based, an attempt has been made to provide an overall view of locational privacy policy environments on an international scale as well. It is hoped that this effort will result in a clearer understanding of the ways in which privacy protection efforts should address the related concepts of law, technology, and practice to effectively minimize the risk of privacy harm.

For full text of the article, click here.

2012 ASPRS special session in Error/Accuracy Assessment and LBS Privacy Issues

Title: ASPRS special session in Error/Accuracy Assessment and LBS Privacy Issues
——
Greetings,

The GIS Division is organizing two special session in Error/Accuracy Assessment and LBS Privacy Issues for the 2012 ASPRS national conference in Sacramento, CA. We are now collecting abstracts for these sessions.

Error/Accuracy Assessment:

One of the major problems of using geo-spatial data is the availability of data and information at multiple spatial scales or resolutions and temporal scales. The end result of using multi-scale data/information is getting varying amount of error in final outcomes. In order to increase accuracy of the final product, it is imperative to know the error amount associated with final outcomes depending upon the scale used in a study.

The purpose of this session is to increase awareness about sources and causes of error when using multi-scale geo-spatial data, and to introduce methods existing to reduce error or establish a functional relationship between scale and error to garner knowledge about error variance associated with scale change.

Location Privacy:

Advancement in geo-spatial technologies has enabled collection and generation of a large amount of geospatial data. Recently there has been an explosion of location-based services (LBS), which use these spatial data to provide location information about an individual’s or vehicle’s location accurately and precisely. Location-based services singularly do not violate personal information but by coordinating location with other types of information, such as an individual’s address, these services can provide personal information to a third party, thereby leading to location privacy violation. Given the recent popularity of location-based services (e.g., smart phones, Twitter’s location API, Google Latitude, etc.), it is imperative to understand the causes and consequences of location privacy violation both in terms of research advancements and legal implications.

Papers are invited in both sessions. If you would like to contribute to this stream of sessions, please contact us (Contact information is below)

Please note that the deadline for abstract submission is August 1, 2011. Finally, please forward this announcement to colleagues that may be interested.

Additional information regarding the conference may be found at:

http://www.asprs.org/Annual-Conferences/ASPRS-2012-Conference/ASPRS-Conference-2012.html

Contact Information:

David Alvarez  Davidalvarez76 [at] gmail [dot] com

Dr Bandana Kar  Bandana [dot] Kar [at] usm [dot] edu

We look forward to seeing everyone in 2012

Sincerely,

David

FCC, FTC Location Based Services (and Privacy) Forum on Tuesday, June 28th

Logo of the United States Federal Communicatio...

Image via Wikipedia

Location Based Services Forum

June 28, 2011 / 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM EDT / FCC, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554

The FCC’s Wireless Telecommunications Bureau in consultation with Federal Trade Commission staff will hold a public education forum featuring representatives of telecommunications carriers, technology companies, consumer advocacy groups and academia on June 28, 2011, exploring how consumers can be both smart and secure when realizing the benefits of Location Based Services (LBS). Topics will include: how LBS works; benefits and risks of LBS; consumer DOs and DON’Ts; industry best practices; and what parents should know about location tracking when their children use mobile devices. See the Public Notice for more information.

Audio/video coverage of the meeting will be broadcast live with open captioning over the Internet from the FCC’s web page at www.fcc.gov/live.  The FCC’s webcast is free to the public.  Those who watch the live video stream of the event may email event-related questions to livequestions@fcc.gov.  Depending on the volume of questions and time constraints, the panel moderators will work to respond to as many questions as possible during the workshop.

FCC steps into privacy debate over location-based data, announcing forum

Logo of the United States Federal Communicatio...

Image via Wikipedia

FCC steps into privacy debate over location-based data, announcing forum

Technology, Los Angeles Times, May 17, 2011

The Federal Communications Commission is stepping into the simmering privacy debate over location data collected through cellphones and mobile devices, announcing a forum next month on the issue that could lead to rules governing the coveted information. … The FCC said Tuesday it had invited Apple, Google and other technology companies, along with wireless providers, consumer groups and academic experts, to participate in a public education forum in Washington on June 28. Among the topics: how location-based services work, their benefits and risks, and information parents should know about location tracking of children who use mobile devices.

Full text of the article via FCC steps into privacy debate over location-based data, announcing forum | Technology | Los Angeles Times.

Accuracy of iPhone Locations: A Comparison of Assisted GPS, WiFi and Cellular Positioning

by Paul A Zandbergen, Department of Geography. University of New Mexico

Abstract: The 3G iPhone was the first consumer device to provide a seamless integration of three positioning technologies: Assisted GPS (A-GPS), WiFi positioning and cellular network positioning. This study presents an evaluation of the accuracy of locations obtained using these three positioning modes on the 3G iPhone. A-GPS locations were validated using surveyed benchmarks and compared to a traditional low-cost GPS receiver running simultaneously. WiFi and cellular positions for indoor locations were validated using high resolution orthophotography. Results indicate that A-GPS locations obtained using the 3G iPhone are much less accurate than those from regular autonomous GPS units (average median error of 8 m for ten 20-minute field tests) but appear sufficient for most Location Based Services (LBS). WiFi locations using the 3G iPhone are much less accurate (median error of 74 m for 58 observations) and fail to meet the published accuracy specifications. Positional errors in WiFi also reveal erratic spatial patterns resulting from the design of the calibration effort underlying the WiFi positioning system. Cellular positioning using the 3G iPhone is the least accurate positioning method (median error of 600 m for 64 observations), consistent with previous studies. Pros and cons of the three positioning technologies are presented in terms of coverage, accuracy and reliability, followed by a discussion of the implications for LBS using the 3G iPhone and similar mobile devices.

Zandbergen, Paul A. 2009. Accuracy of iPhone Locations: A Comparison of Assisted GPS, WiFi and Cellular Positioning. Transactions in GIS, 13(s1): 5-26

For full text of the article, click here.

Are Location-Based Services Ready to Turn the Corner? – NYTimes.com

Are Location-Based Services Ready to Turn the Corner?

By RYAN KIM of GigaOm, NYT, January 26, 2011

Despite reports that location-based services are far from mainstream, new research by Microsoft suggests the technology is gaining adoption and may be poised to follow in the footsteps of the ATM, which took some time to dispel safety concerns on its way to being universally used. In an online survey of 1,500 people around the world last month, 51 percent report having used a location-based service including 50 percent in the U.S. That’s considerably higher than what the Pew Research Center found when it reported in November that only 7 percent of online U.S. adults use location-based services regularly. …

For full text of the article, click on Are Location-Based Services Ready to Turn the Corner? – NYTimes.com.

%d bloggers like this: