Tag Archive | Library of Congress

MAPPS Promotes “Map It Once, Use It Many Times” Act

At the prompting of MAPPS, Rep Doug Lamborn (Co-5) introduced HR 4233, Map It Once, Use It Many Times Act, in the U.S. House of Representatives on March 21, 2012. This bill was referred to several congressional committees. The following summary was written by the Congressional Research Service, a nonpartisan arm of the Library of Congress, which serves Congress.

Map It Once, Use It Many Times Act – Establishes the National Geospatial Technology Administration in the Department of the Interior. Directs the Administrator of the National Geospatial Technology Administration to: (1) establish a National Geospatial Database of all U.S. owned or managed lands (including public lands), Indian trust parcels, and non-federal lands in each state; and (2) determine whether any U.S. owned or managed property may be better managed through ownership by a non-federal entity. Requires the Administrator to implement the recommendations of the National Geospatial Data Plan developed by the National Geospatial Policy Commission established by this Act. Requires the Administrator to promulgate standards for ensuring the interoperability of geospatial data collected by or with the support of the federal government. Transfers to the Administrator all geospatial functions vested by law in the Department of the Interior, the Department of Agriculture (USDA) with respect to the National Forest System, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Read More…

GIS Analyst Position at the Congressional Research Service

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Job Title: Geographic/Geospatial Information Systems (GIS) Analyst

Agency: Library Of Congress Congressional Research Service

Job Announcement Number: 110094

SALARY RANGE: $89,033.00 – $115,742.00 /year

OPEN PERIOD: Monday, June 20, 2011 to Monday, July 11, 2011

SERIES & GRADE: GS-1370-13/13

POSITION INFORMATION: Open Permanent

PROMOTION POTENTIAL: 13

DUTY LOCATIONS: 1 vacancy(s) in one of the following locations: Washington, DC

WHO MAY BE CONSIDERED: U.S. citizens

JOB SUMMARY: The Congressional Research Service (CRS) Knowledge Services Group (KSG) seeks a Geographic/Geospatial Information Systems (GIS) Analyst. The person hired for this position will work in partnership with analysts, attorneys, information professionals, graphic design specialists, and cartographers to find and use authoritative GIS sources to create sophisticated geospatial models and visual materials that anticipate and illustrate complex public policy issues for the Congress. As part of this work, the GIS Analyst will provide GIS analysis and support; and develop policies and guidelines for the GIS program, including development of clear procedures for intake of requests, prioritization of work, identification of division of labor, definition of deliverables, and following through with clients. The GIS Analyst will also provide training and promote GIS services throughout CRS. CRS works exclusively for the United States Congress, providing policy and legal analysis to committees and Members of both the House and Senate, regardless of party affiliation. As a legislative branch agency within the Library of Congress, CRS has been a valued and respected resource on Capitol Hill for nearly a century. CRS is well known for analysis that is authoritative, confidential, objective and nonpartisan. Its highest priority is to ensure that Congress has immediate access to the nation’s best thinking on public policy issues of interest to its Members and Committees.

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Status of Policy Implementations of Open Government Data

…2009 was a big year. We saw the Senate start publishing votes in XML, the launch of data.gov and the Open Government Directive, and the GPO released XML for the Federal Register and Code of Federal Regulations. … There were also open standards laws passed in Vancouver and Portland. 2010 was a big year for posturing. We saw introduced in Congress H.R. 4983: Transparency in Government Act of 2010 Quigley, H.R. 6289: To direct the Librarian of Congress to make available to the public the bulk legislative… Foster, and H.R. 4858: The Public Online Information Act of 2010. The Congressional Transparency Caucus was created Quigley/Issa.  …

Source: Joshua Tauberer’s Blog, posted April 18, 2011 For full text of the article with links to legislation, click on The status of policy implementations of Open Government Data Joshua Tauberer’s Blog.

Congressional Research Service Questions Open Government Initiative

CRS Questions Open Government Initiative

SECRECY NEWS
from the FAS Project on Government Secrecy
Volume 2011, Issue No. 15
February 14, 2011

Secrecy News Blog:  http://www.fas.org/blog/secrecy/

The Congressional Research Service took a decidedly skeptical view of the Obama Administration’s Open Government Initiative in a recently updated report (pdf).  The report called into question not only the implementation of the Administration’s transparency policy but also its underlying rationale. “Arguably, releasing previously unavailable datasets to the public increases transparency,” the report granted.  “The new datasets offer the public more information than was previously available, making the particular issue area more transparent.  But this type of transparency does not give Congress or the public much insight into how the federal government itself operates or executes policies,” the CRS report said. But even bona fide transparency may not be altogether positive, the CRS report suggested.  “…Increased participation may increase trust in the federal government while concurrently reducing the speed of government action.  Additionally, increased government transparency may prompt security and privacy concerns.”

For full text of the Secrecy News article, click here.

The bulk of the CRS report was written last year, but it was updated last month.  See “The Obama Administration’s Open Government Initiative: Issues for Congress,” January 28, 2011.

First U.S. map purchased for record price

First Map of US from 1784

First U.S. map purchased for record price

By Jacqueline Trescott, Washington Post Staff Writer, Sunday, January 30, 2011; 10:48 PM

The first map of the United States, created in 1784, has been purchased for the record price of $1.8 million by Washington philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, who is lending it to the Library of Congress. The Abel Buell map, named after the Connecticut cartographer who created it, has been a missing link in the library’s vast collection of maps. Rubenstein, the co-founder and managing director of the Carlyle Group, bought the map at an auction at Christie’s in December. He was attracted to the map’s historic pedigree, he says.”This is the first map copyrighted, the first one to have the American flag and the first one made after the American Revolution. And it was the first one printed in the U.S.,” Rubenstein said. …

For full text of article, visit First U.S. map purchased for record price.

“The historical society, cash-strapped because of state budget cuts, was criticized by some in the museum field for selling this and other treasures.” It ended well, but was it ethical for them to do so?

Advice for federal agencies on social media records management [REPORT] | Gov 2.0: The Power of Platforms

One of the risks and rewards for the use of Web 2.0 that came up in the July hearing on “government 2.0” technology in the House of Representatives had nothing to do with privacy, secrecy, security or embarrassment. Instead, it was a decidedly more prosaic concern, and one that is no surprise to anyone familiar with governmental institutions: record keeping. And no, this is not another story about how the Library of Congress is archiving the world’s tweets.

IBM’s Business of Government Center has released a new report on social media (PDF) records management, focusing on some best practices for harried federal employees faced with rapidly expanding troves of tweets, Facebook status updates, blog posts or wikis. For those keeping track, 22 of 24 agencies now, at the minimum, have a Facebook presence.

For full text of the article, click on Advice for federal agencies on social media records management [REPORT] | Gov 2.0: The Power of Platforms.

Source: Alex Howard, gov20.govfresh, December 20, 2010

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