Tag Archive | Joplin

NOAA app delivers aerial, satellite imagery to first responders’ mobile devices

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administratio...

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By Henry Kenyon, Government Computer News, Oct 07, 2011

Emergency crews responding to major natural disasters such as earthquakes and hurricanes now have access to a Web application that delivers aerial and satellite imagery of the area to their smart phones and tablet computers. The prototype application was created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Geodetic Survey.

Full text of the article via NOAA app delivers aerial, satellite imagery to first responders’ mobile devices — Government Computer News.

Blind Eye In The Sky: Weather Satellites Lose Funding

Satellite Image of Earth's Interrelated System...

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by Jon Hamilton, NPR, June 17, 2011

Government officials are forecasting a turbulent future for the nation’s weather satellite program. Federal budget cuts are threatening to leave the U.S. without some critical satellites, the officials say, and that could mean less accurate warnings about events like tornadoes and blizzards. In particular, officials at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are concerned about satellites that orbit over the earth’s poles rather than remaining over a fixed spot along the equator. These satellites are “the backbone” of any forecast beyond a couple of days, says Kathryn Sullivan, assistant secretary of commerce for environmental observation and prediction, and NOAA’s deputy administrator. It was data from polar satellites that alerted forecasters to the risk of tornadoes in Alabama and Mississippi back in April, Sullivan says. “With the polar satellites currently in place we were able to give those communities five days’ heads up,” she says. …

For full text of the article, visit Blind Eye In The Sky: Weather Satellites Lose Funding : NPR.

How Social Media is Changing Disaster Response – TIME

By Erin SkardaTime online, June 09, 2011

…With cell-phone service largely unavailable and a distance of several thousand miles between her house in Amsterdam, N.Y., and Joplin, Williamson-Smith posted photos of James on several Facebook pages that were created in the aftermath of the tornado. Less than 24 hours later, she saw a comment on a page called “Joplin Tornado Citizen Checks” that said James had been found and was volunteering with search-and-rescue teams. “Even though at that point we hadn’t spoken to him directly, it was comforting to know that someone out there had seen him and that he was O.K.,” says Williamson-Smith. …

For full text of the article visist Facebook to the Rescue! How Social Media is Changing Disaster Response – TIME.

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