Tag Archive | information technology

PCAST Updates Assessment of Networking and InfoTech R&D

Posted by David Shaw, Susan Graham, and Peter Lee, The White House on January 17, 2013 at 05:43 PM ED

The President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology PCAST released its latest report to the President and Congress, Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and Information Technology. The report is a Congressionally mandated assessment of the Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development NITRD Program, which coordinates the Nation’s federally-funded research and development R&D in areas such as supercomputing, high-speed network­ing, cybersecurity, software technology, and information management. The report is an update on progress since the last such assessment was conducted in 2010.

The United States is a world leader in R&D for networking and information technology NIT—a sector that touches virtually every human endeavor and fuels economic growth, national security, and enhanced quality of life. NIT capabilities are at the core of our Nation’s infrastructure—underpinning and enabling diverse functions ranging from communication and commerce to defense and manufacturing. New NIT insights and discoveries ensure that the Nation remains a safe and healthy place where Americans can continue to succeed and thrive.

In its new report, PCAST concludes that progress has been made toward addressing a number of the recommendations made in the 2010 report. For example, the report cites notable steps forward in multi-agency work to advance “big data,” health IT, robotics, and cybersecurity, and calls out significant progress toward creating infrastructure for network scaling and NIT testbeds.The report also notes that many important areas have received less attention and investment than is needed, making recommendations summarized on page xi for stronger coordination among agencies to meet continuing NIT challenges in educational technology, data privacy, energy, transportation, and other important sectors.

Among other recommendations, PCAST proposes development of new multi-agency initiatives to catalyze innovation and advances in high-performance computing, understanding of collective online human activity, surface and air transportation, and learning sciences and also recommends measures to strengthen the Nation’s NIT workforce through training programs, continuing education opportunities, and other mechanisms. To ensure continued multi-agency coordination and investment in NIT areas, PCAST recommends establishment of a high-level standing PCAST sub-committee that would focus on providing ongoing strategic advice in this domain.

The United States has set the standard for innovation in NIT R&D. PCAST believes that implementation of the recom­mendations in this report will help the Nation maintain its leading NIT edge in an increasingly competitive global environment.

The full PCAST report is available here.

David Shaw, Susan Graham, and Peter Lee are co-chairs of the PCAST NITRD Working Group and Dr. Shaw is a member of PCAST.PCAST is an advisory group of the Nation’s leading scientists and engineers, appointed by the President to augment the science and tech­nology advice available to him from inside the White House and from cabinet departments and other Federal agencies. For more information about PCAST, please visit the PCAST website.

via PCAST Updates Assessment of Networking and InfoTech R&D | The White House.

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Too Big to Succeed: The Need for Federal IT Reform

The following is part of a special series of policy briefs by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars running until inauguration day. This piece, written by Commons Lab Early Career Scholar Zachary Bastian, tackles the need for reform in federal information technology.

As the world has become more dependent on information technology (IT), so has the federal government and its constituencies. Leveraged effectively, technical tools can engage the public, create cost savings, and improve outcomes. These benefits are obscured by regular reminders that federal IT is fundamentally flawed. It is too big to succeed. For IT to become sustainable, the federal government must enable change in three categories: 1) embracing agile development, modular contracting, and open-source software, 2) prioritizing small business participation, and 3) shifting the federal IT culture towards education and experimentation. The adoption of these reforms is vital. The current state of federal IT undermines good work through inefficiency and waste.

Click here to read the remainder of this brief on Scribd.

New CRS Report on Federal Networking and IT Research and Development Program

English: Seal of the United States Congression...

The Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development  Program: Background, Funding, and Activities

by Patricia Moloney Figliola, Congressional Research Service, January 13, 2012

SUMMARY: In the early 1990s, Congress recognized that several federal agencies had ongoing high performance computing programs, but no central coordinating body existed to ensure long-term coordination and planning. To provide such a framework, Congress passed the High-Performance Computing and Communications Program Act of 1991 (P.L. 102-194) to enhance the effectiveness of the various programs. In conjunction with the passage of the act, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) released Grand Challenges: High-Performance Computing and Communications. That document outlined a research and development (R&D) strategy for high-performance computing and a framework for a multiagency program, the High-Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The HPCC Program has evolved over time and is now called the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program, to better reflect its expanded mission.

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Geospatial Information Technology in Indonesia and its Legal Framework

Deborah N. Simorangkir, Universitas Pelita Harapan, and Davidson Samoir, HukumOnline.com, Revista 2- Año 1, (Abr-2011-Jun-2011) ISSN 2173-6588. Abstract: Throughout the history of humankind, cultural, economic, political, and technical forces have led to social changes. Some of these changes were drastic, but some others were more gradual. The latest innovation that has changed society drastically and is sure to evolve rapidly in the future is geospatial information technology. Even though Indonesia is a developing country, the development of its technology is not far behind other countries – including in geospatial technology. Because such technology is no longer restricted to the military but is now available to a wider public, laws must be passed to ensure that the end users will get credible, accurate and accountable information and that in the end, geospatial products actually serve for the betterment of society.

For full text of the article visit Geospatial Information Technology in Indonesia and its Legal Framework. Thanks to Kevin Pomfret for the heads up.

House Technology and Innovation Subcommittee Hearing – Cloud Computing

Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation | 2318 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 | 09/21/2011 – 10:00am – 12:00pm

The Next IT Revolution?: Cloud Computing Opportunities and Challenges

Witnesses

  • Mr. Michael Capellas, Chairman and CEO, Virtual Computing Environment Company
  • Dr. Dan Reed, Corporate Vice President, Technology Policy Group, Microsoft Corporation
  • Mr. Nick Combs, Federal Chief Technology Officer, EMC Corporation
  • Dr. David McClure, Associate Administrator, Office of Citizen Services and Innovative Technologies, General Services Administration

via Technology and Innovation Subcommittee Hearing – Cloud Computing | Committee on Science – U.S. House of Representatives.

Crisis Management: Understanding the Real Impact of ICTs, Social Media and Crisis Mapping 

Digital Development Debates, published by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, features a short essay from the ICT for Peace Foundation looking at the use of ICTs in crisis response, peace-keeping, conflict resolution and state-building.

by Daniel Stauffacher, Barbara Weekes, Sanjana Hattotuwa, June 23, 2011

The idea of trying to better understand the role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in promoting and building peace emerged, at a policy level, in the context of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS)[1]. In preparing for the first phase of the Summit, held in Geneva in 2003, it was recognized that the scope of what was considered primarily a technical matter of communications and infrastructure needed to be enlarged to encompass content, development, socio-political goals and emergent fields such as e-health, e-education, and e-government. Information and communication technology has become a societal issue presenting both opportunities and challenges. The WSIS “Geneva Declaration of Principles and Plan of Action” consequently emphasized the central role of ICTs in many areas of economic and social development. The risk of a growing ‘digital divide’, where ICTs could reinforce rather than reduce inequalities was acknowledged, and recommendations were made in order to turn the digital divide into a digital opportunity for all. …

for full text of the article visit Digital Development Debates – 04 Media – Disaster relief – Crisis Management  .

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Hearing: Examining the President’s Plan for Eliminating Wasteful Spending In Information Technology

SENATE HEARING

Examining the President’s Plan for Eliminating Wasteful Spending in Information Technology

Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 at 10:30 AM

Dirksen Senate Office Building, room SD-342

Witnesses

Panel 1

Panel 2

  • Mr. Stephen O’Keeffe, Founder, Meri Talk Online
  • Rishi Sood, Vice President, Gartner Incorporated
  • Al Grasso, President and Chief Executive Officer, MITRE Corporation

To watch the hearing on video, visit: United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs : Hearings.

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