Tag Archive | Indonesia

How the UN want to use Big Data to spot crises

Posted by Timo Luge on Social Media 4 Good Blog, May 15, 2012

Robert Kirkpatrick from the UN’s Global Pulse team is talking about how United Nations agencies would like to use big data to search for crises in real-time. It’s a fascinating talk and Kirkpatrick shows how his team has been using data mining techniques to monitor bread prices in Latin America and rice prices in Indonesia. …Equally interesting is what he would like to do in the future: for example get information showing the streams of money being sent via mobile banking in developing countries. If the UN could see changes in behaviour, he argues, then they might be able to spot issues that are in the process of developing.

For a full text of the article and link to the video of Robert Kirkpatrick’s talk visit How the UN want to use Big Data to spot crises : Social Media 4 Good.

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Kevin Pomfret’s Top 10 Spatial Law and Policy Stories of 2011

Spatial Law and Policy: Top 10 Stories of 2011

by Kevin Pomfret, Spatial Law and Policy Blob, December 27, 2011

  • U.S. Supreme Court to address law enforcement’s use of tracking devices.
  • Impact of budget cuts becoming more pronounced
  • Privacy issues regarding geolocation becomes international story
  • Increased efforts to regulate Internet
  • Commercial use of drones becoming a reality
  • Lightsquared/GPS dispute
  • India revises its Remote Sensing Data Policy
  • Indonesia passes Geospatial Information Act
  • Big Data

For full text of Kevin’s article with a great discussion on each topic and useful links, visit Spatial Law and Policy: Spatial Law and Policy: Top 10 Stories of 2011.

Geospatial Information Technology in Indonesia and its Legal Framework

Deborah N. Simorangkir, Universitas Pelita Harapan, and Davidson Samoir, HukumOnline.com, Revista 2- Año 1, (Abr-2011-Jun-2011) ISSN 2173-6588. Abstract: Throughout the history of humankind, cultural, economic, political, and technical forces have led to social changes. Some of these changes were drastic, but some others were more gradual. The latest innovation that has changed society drastically and is sure to evolve rapidly in the future is geospatial information technology. Even though Indonesia is a developing country, the development of its technology is not far behind other countries – including in geospatial technology. Because such technology is no longer restricted to the military but is now available to a wider public, laws must be passed to ensure that the end users will get credible, accurate and accountable information and that in the end, geospatial products actually serve for the betterment of society.

For full text of the article visit Geospatial Information Technology in Indonesia and its Legal Framework. Thanks to Kevin Pomfret for the heads up.

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