Tag Archive | Human Rights and Liberties

The Use of Drones for Nonviolent Civil Resistance

Follow-up op-ed by Patrick Meier, iRevolution Blog, February 18, 2012

In my [Patrick Meier’s] previous blog post on the use of drones for human rights, I also advocated for the use of drones to support nonviolent civil resistance efforts. Obviously, like the use of any technology in such contexts, doing so presents both new opportunities and obvious dangers. In this blog post, I consider the use of DIY drones in the context of civil resistance, both vis-a-vis theory and practice. While I’ve read the civil resistance literature rather widely for my dissertation, I decided to get input from two of the world’s leading experts on the topic. …

For full text of this article, visit The Use of Drones for Nonviolent Civil Resistance | iRevolution.

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Drones for Human Rights: Brilliant or Foolish? (Updated)

By Patrick Meier, iRevolution Blog, on February 10, 2012

My [Patrick Meier’s] colleague Mark Hanis recently co-authored this Op-Ed in the New York Times advocating for the use of drones in human rights monitoring, particularly in Syria. The Op-Ed has provoked quite the debate on a number of list-serves like CrisisMappers, and several blog posts have been published on the question. I’ve long been interested this topic, which is why I included a section on drones in this official UN Foundation Report on “New Technologies in Emergen-cies and Conflicts: The Role of Information and Social Networks.” I also blogged about the World Food Program’s (WFP) use of drones some four years ago. …

For full text of Patrick Meier’s op-ed, visit Drones for Human Rights: Brilliant or Foolish? (Updated) | iRevolution.

Crowd-sourced data hold potential for positive change and human rights abuses

Crowd-sourced data hold potential for positive change and human rights abuses

By Robin Lloyd, Scientific American | Feb 18, 2011 01:35 PM |

Social media has scored big successes in helping crowds to gather and communicate online to challenge oppressive regimes in recent weeks, but digital gathering places that are basically public—and the crowd-sourced data they generate—also carry risks. Crowds are forming so rapidly online—the photo-sharing app Instagram reported enrolling one million users in the past six weeks—that many platform managers fail to take full responsibility for protecting the users who post reports online, or for anticipating how the data might be abused by authorities.

For full text, visit Observations: Crowd-sourced data hold potential for positive change and human rights abuses.

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