Tag Archive | health

Seeing through the Crowds: Crowdmaps Visualize User-Reported Data for Public Health

by Maged N. Kamel Boulos, Geoplace.com, July 9, 2012

Crowd-sensing and citizen reporting of incidents are becoming increasingly common, with applications ranging from air-quality monitoring to building a database of all the Automated External Defibrillators in a major city (www.uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_Releases/2011/12/myheartmap-challenge) to protest movements, political activism and citizen journalism, as witnessed in the 2011/2012 “Occupy Movement” and “Arab Spring” events.A comprehensive review of the main technologies and standards involved in this domain was published in the International Journal of Health Geographics in December 2011 (dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-072X-10-67). This article, however, focuses on the use of “crowdmaps” for visualizing crowdsourced data. Crowd-generated reports and other material often produce Big Data: large, continuous streams of data that pose major challenges when trying to visualize, understand and make sense of them, particularly when attempting to do so in real time. This article presents several examples of crowdmaps, covering a diverse range of topics in which the spatiotemporal distribution (and content) of the corresponding crowdsourced data are displayed on a familiar, interactive (geographic) map interface.
For full text of the article, visit Seeing through the Crowds: Crowdmaps Visualize User-Reported Data | Articles – Publishing Titles | GeoPlace.

Will we live in a voluntary surveillance society within five years?

David Perera, Fierce Government, November 13, 2011

The executive body of the European Union should consider a new regulatory framework in anticipation of an socialized world of ubiquitous devices that gather personal data from nearly every aspect of human behavior, says a new report from the European Network and Information Security Agency. In a report released Nov. 11, ENISA envisions a world within the next 5 years that includes networked automobiles, small medical sensors planted on people, constant and automatic updates to social sites and the widespread use of data mining to draw conclusions about people’s lifestyle choices, health and productivity. …

For full text of article, visit EU agency warns of voluntary surveillance society – FierceGovernmentIT. For report the ENISA report webpage, go to “To Log or Not to Log? Risks and Benefits Of Emerging Life-Logging Applications”

The Future of the Value of Data

by Bradley Kreit in the Future Now Blog, March 28, 2011

Some of the more interesting questions that emerge from using advanced analytics and algorithms to drive our understandings of health surround a question that is likely to get a lot more contentious over the next decade: Who owns the right to new ideas, products, services and cures that emerge from the findings we gain from mining the collective?  … At this year’s World Economic Forum, as the Wallstreet Journal reports, “executives and academics gathered to discuss how to turn personal data into an “asset class” by giving people the right to manage and sell it on their own behalf.”…

For full text of this great article, click here.

Related Articles

Designers Make Data Much Easier to Digest

by Natasha Singer, NYT, April 2, 2011

In an uncharted world of boundless data, information designers are our new navigators. They are computer scientists, statisticians, graphic designers, producers and cartographers who map entire oceans of data and turn them into innovative visual displays, like rich graphs and charts, that help both companies and consumers cut through the clutter. These gurus of visual analytics are making interactive data synonymous with attractive data.

for full text of the article, visit Designers Make Data Much Easier to Digest – NYTimes.com.

GAO Reports on Federal Geospatial Investments and Coordination

Geospatial Information: Better Coordination and Oversight Could Help Reduce Duplicative Investments

GAO-04-824T June 23, 2004

The collection, maintenance, and use of location-based (geospatial) information are essential to federal agencies carrying out their missions. Geographic information systems (GIS) are critical elements used in the areas of homeland security, healthcare, natural resources conservation, and countless other applications. GAO was asked to review the extent to which the federal government is coordinating the efficient sharing of geospatial assets, including through Office of Management and Budget (OMB) oversight. GAO’s report on this matter, Geospatial Information: Better Coordination Needed to Identify and Reduce Duplicative Investments (GAO-04-703), is being released today. GAO’s testimony focuses on the extent to which the federal government is coordinating the sharing of geospatial assets, including through oversight measures in place at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), in order to identify and reduce redundancies in geospatial data and systems.

OMB, cross-government committees, and individual federal agencies have taken actions to coordinate geospatial investments across agencies and with state and local governments. However, these efforts have not been fully successful due to (1) a complete and up-to-date strategic plan is missing. The existing strategic plan for coordinating national geospatial resources and activities is out of date and lacks specific measures for identifying and reducing redundancies, (2) federal agencies are not consistently complying with OMB direction to coordinate their investments, and (3) OMB’s oversight methods have not been effective in identifying or eliminating instances of duplication. This has resulted from OMB not collecting consistent, key investment information from all agencies. Consequently, agencies continue to independently acquire and maintain potentially duplicative systems. This costly practice is likely to continue unless coordination is significantly improved. http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-04-824T

 

Geographic Information Systems: Challenges to Effective Data Sharing

GAO-03-874T June 10, 2003

Geographic information systems (GIS) manipulate, analyze, and graphically present an array of information associated with geographic locations, have been invaluable to all levels of government. Their usefulness in disaster response was recently demonstrated during the Space Shuttle Columbia recovery effort. GIS provided precise maps and search grids to guide crews to the debris that was strewn across 41 counties in Texas and Louisiana. The federal government has long been attempting to develop an integrated nationwide GIS network. The information available through such a network could significantly enhance decision–making in myriad public–service areas, including emergency response, national security, law enforcement, health care, and the environment. Among GAO’s objectives were to describe the federal government’s efforts to coordinate GIS activities, the long-standing challenges of adopting and implementing federal GIS standards, and the role of Geospatial One-Stop.

Read More…

President Obama Addresses National Academy of Sciences

President Obama addressed members of the National Academy of Sciences on April 27, announcing a renewed commitment to science, technology, engineering, and medicine. Topics included America’s energy future, revitalizing our health care system, science and math education, and allocating funding and implementing policies to ensure that America reclaims a position of world leadership in scientific innovation.

To watch webcast, click here.

 

%d bloggers like this: