Tag Archive | Haiti

Haiti Earthquake a Year Later What Has Space Learned

Guest Blog: Haiti Earthquake a Year Later: What Has Space Learned?

Adriane Cornell, Space News, January 12, 2011

… After a disaster strikes, current practice ideally has it that the affected country requests aid from the United Nations, and the International Charter Space and Major Disasters is then activated. Space derived data is collected from organizations that are part of the Charter and this information is sent to other organizations who then produce maps and informational reports on the disaster. These organizations then send their information to the disaster responders and the international community. The United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER) tries throughout the process to support the complicated information exchange. …

For full text of this article, visit Guest Blog Haiti Earthquake a Year Later What Has Space Learned | SpaceNews.com.

Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism

by Nancy Scola, Tech President, June 3, 2011 – 4:35pm

Every time something happens in the world these days, somebody makes a map about it.We saw it with last January’s devastating earthquake in Haiti, the rollout of the U.S.’s long-awaited National Broadband Map in February, the personalized maps that accompanied April’s iPhone tracking story. We see it every election. And with the increasing availability of free and open-source or simply cheap mapping tools, and the growing footprint of the open data movement, democratized mapping is likely only getting started. …

via Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism | techPresident.

PBS Video: Crisis mappers: Mobile technology helps disaster victims worldwide

PBS, May 13, 2011

There are now 6.8 billion people on the planet. And about 5 billion cell phones. This extraordinary ability to connect has turned a modern convenience into a lifeline through a system called crisis mapping. It first gained prominence after the earthquake in Haiti, when people used their cell phones to send text messages to a centralized response team. Since then, crisis mapping has been used to help victims in emergency zones following the tornadoes in the Midwest, the earthquake in Japan and the unrest in the Middle East. Today, there are hundreds of volunteers in more than 50 countries creating maps of crises around the world, using a system that incorporates the lessons learned in Haiti. Alison Stewart reports on this worldwide network of volunteers – regular people — using a breakthrough technology to help others.

For link to video, visit Video: Crisis mappers: Mobile technology helps disaster victims worldwide | Need to Know.

The Political Power of Social Media | Foreign Affairs

By Clay  Shirky, Foreign Affairs, January/February 2011

… Since the rise of the Internet in the early 1990s, the world’s networked population has grown from the low millions to the low billions. Over the same period, social media have become a fact of life for civil society worldwide, involving many actors — regular citizens, activists, nongovernmental organizations, telecommunications firms, software providers, governments. This raises an obvious question for the U.S. government: How does the ubiquity of social media affect U.S. interests, and how should U.S. policy respond to it? …

For full text of the article, visit The Political Power of Social Media | Foreign Affairs.

Haiti Earthquake a Year Later What Has Space Learned

Guest Blog: Haiti Earthquake a Year Later: What Has Space Learned?

Space News, Wed, 12 January, 2011 Submitted by: Ariane Cornell

…After a disaster strikes, current practice ideally has it that the affected country requests aid from the United Nations, and the International Charter Space and Major Disasters is then activated. Space derived data is collected from organizations that are part of the Charter and this information is sent to other organizations who then produce maps and informational reports on the disaster. These organizations then send their information to the disaster responders and the international community. The United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER) tries throughout the process to support the complicated information exchange….

For full text, visit Guest Blog Haiti Earthquake a Year Later What Has Space Learned | SpaceNews.com.

NRC Disasters Roundtable: Using Lessons from Haiti and Chile to Reduce Global Risk

National Research Council Disasters Roundtable Workshop 32
Using Lessons from Haiti and Chile to Reduce Global Risk

March 1, 2011
The Venable Conference Center
575 – 7th Street, NW – The Capitol Room
Washington, DC, 20004

In 2010, Haiti and Chile experienced devastating earthquakes. The Haitian earthquake measured about 7.0 on the Richter Scale and led to more than 200,000 deaths, 1.5 million displaced Haitians, and more than $3 billion committed to Haiti’s recovery. The Chilean earthquake measured 8.8 on the Richter Scale, and led to about 500 deaths, 1.8 million affected Chileans, and about $13 million committed to Chile’s recovery. The differences and the similarities between the two earthquakes present researchers, practitioners, the US Government, and the international community with tremendous learning opportunities to reduce global and US domestic risk to natural hazards. The Disasters Roundtable is hosting a workshop, Using Lessons from Haiti and Chile to Reduce Global Risk, to identify, clarify, and find applications for the lessons from the earthquakes in Haiti and Chile. With contributions from Haitians, Chileans, and those from the US Government and international community, the Disasters Roundtable of the National Academies’ workshop aims to illustrate how both the expected and the unexpected outcomes and occurrences in these earthquakes can better prepare the USG and the international community for the next disaster. The workshop will focus on:

  1. the role of pre-existing conditions in the impact, response, and recovery of these earthquake events;
  2. what was learned from the expected and the unexpected outcomes of these earthquakes; and
  3. how to use lessons from Haiti and Chile to reduce disaster risk in the future.

Download the full Meeting Agenda (PDF)

Click here to register to attend the workshop at the Venable Conference Center in Washington, DC

Click here to register to participate in the video webcast of this workshop

 

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