Tag Archive | GIO

New NASCIO Guidebook for State CIO’s, Chapter on Geospatial Systems

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Posted on NSGIC Blog, May 30, 2011

Every state CIO should have received a new guidebook in May that highlights the value of GIS and gives them pointers on how to maximize those benefits. The book, CIO Leadership for State Governments – Emerging Trends and Practices, was sponsored and distributed by NASCIO, the National Association of State CIOs. NSGIC wrote the chapter…called “A State CIO’s Guide to Geospatial Systems – Putting everything in its Proper Place.” It provides a history of evolution of the technology and then presents many ways it is being used to make government more efficient and effective. …

For full text of the article, visit NSGIC News: GIS for CIOs.

Place-Based Policies: Think “Where” First, Not Last

To kick off a new Initiative on Place-Based Public Management, the National Academy of Public Administration hosted a forum on Friday, May 20, 2011, to explore the potential that place-based policies and geospatial capabilities hold for improving public management. Speakers included:

  • Xavier Briggs, the primary author of the 2009 White House memo on Place-Based Policy and OMB Associate Director for General Government Services
  • Raphael Bostic, Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and Research, Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • Keith Barber, the lead for implementing DoD priorities for “whole of government” geospatial  capabilities, National Geospatial-Intelligence Administration
  • Michael Byrne, GIO, Federal Communications Commission, and lead for implementing the National Broadband Map
  • Jerry Johnston, GIO, Environmental Protection Agency, and geospatial lead for Data.gov
  • Mark Reichardt, President and CIO, Open Geospatial Consortium, a leading standards organization enabling place-based strategies

You can find more information about this initiative here.

R. Scott Fosler, who moderated the forum, summarized the key points of the discussion. First, Fosler stated, we must demonstrate “purposeful leadership.” We must identify the public purpose of geospatial technology implementation — economic development, environmental sustainability, community health, and security — at the outset. What are the expected outcomes and impacts for citizens? Second, Fosler noted that with respect to Place-Based Policies and related technologies, the Obama Administration is taking a demand-based approach, not a supply-based approach. Again, what is the impact, and how do we keep costs down? Third, Fosler asked, what are the processes and instruments that can be used to further develop and carry out place-based policies? “All these technologies are tools of management to be used in real-time and in real places,” he said. Lastly, Fosler stressed the importance of ongoing collaboration across boundaries, professions, governments, and sectors.

As we think about the future of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure, Jerry Johnston reiterated that we must focus on the public policy use cases first, not on the technology. Raphael Bostic emphasized that technology does not equal policy, and stressed the need for: 1) innovation and openness; 2) simplicity and ease of use; and 3) flexibility. He also listed several challenges that we must meet, including providing leadership on governance; creating community around placed-based policy making; lifting up applied uses; and developing “playbooks” from which communities can adopt solutions. Michael Byrne quipped, “think ‘where’ first, not last,” and then closed with an important point that federal data publication and consumption should be in a single vein.

NAPA Forum on Place-Based Public Management

National Academy of Public Administration Forum on Place-Based Public Management

The rapid advance of geospatial technology and its embeddedness in everyday life (e.g., GPS in every cell phone) are fueling major changes in thinking, behavior, and interaction in business, government, and private life. To kick off our Initiative on Place-Based Public Management, the National Academy of Public Administration will host a forum on May 20, 2011, to explore the potential that place-based policies and geospatial capabilities hold for improving public management.

The centerpiece of this forum will be a Panel of federal and private-sector leaders that will (1) discuss lessons learned in developing and implementing place-based approaches to public management; and (2) identify the key challenges and opportunities in realizing the full potential of these approaches. Speakers on this Panel will include:

  • Xavier Briggs, the primary author of the 2009 White House memo on Place-Based Policy and OMB Associate Director for General Government Services
  • Raphael Bostic, Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and Research, Department of Housing and Urban Development
  • Keith Barber, the lead for implementing DoD priorities for “whole of government” geospatial  capabilities, National Geospatial-Intelligence Administration
  • Michael Byrne, GIO, Federal Communications Commission, and lead for implementing the National Broadband Map
  • Jerry Johnston, GIO, Environmental Protection Agency, and geospatial lead for Data.gov
  • Mark Reichardt, President and CIO, Open Geospatial Consortium, a leading standards organization enabling place-based strategies

The full forum agenda is available here.

For more information on the Academy’s Place-Based Public Management Initiative, click here.

MEETING DETAILS

Date: Friday, May 20, 2011 from 8:30 AM to 11:30 AM

Location: National Academy of Public Administration, 900 7th Street NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC

RSVP: As space is limited, please RSVP to Chloe Yang at yyang [at] napawash [dot] org or by phone at 202 204-3662. In your RSVP, please indicate your organization and title.

via Forum on Place-Based Public Management | National Academy of Public Administration.

AK GIS Strategic Plan Gets Legislative Attention

State GIS Strategic Plans, most developed with grant support from the FGDC, are starting to gain traction and find support among more than just the GIS “true believers.”

Arkansas GIO Shelby Johnson testified before his state legislature’s Advanced Communications and Information Technology Joint Committee on June 9, 2010. With strategic planning consultant Michael Terner, of Applied Geographics, at his side, Mr. Johnson gave a presentation, below, on the state of GIS coordination in Arkansas and on the recently accepted Geospatial Strategic Business Plan (PDF).

For full article, visit NSGIC blog here.

National Geospatial Advisory Committee Discusses New National Geospatial Strategy

If you haven’t already heard:

The Federal Geographic Data Committe’s (FGDC) National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC) will meet on May 12-13, 2009 at the George Washington University Cafritz Conference Center, 800 21st Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20052.  The meeting will be in Room 405. The meeting will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on May 12 and from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on May 13.

The May NGAC agenda focuses on the development of a new national geospatial policy and strategic plan. Is it time for a new governance structure? Do we need a national Geographic Information Officer (GIO) under the National CIO? What is the distinction between a “national GIS” and a “federal GIS”? How can we improve stakeholder engagement  in national geospatial priority setting? Stay tuned!

 Click here to check out the following NGAC documents:

  • NGAC Report: The Changing Geospatial Landscape
  • NGAC Transition Recommendations
  • Summary of Key Recommendations (Decisions made over last  year)

 

Geospatial Information Officer for DOI? Chief Technology Officer for the Nation?

Two things of possible interest: The first is a discussion of the implications of a possible appointment of a Geospatial Information Officer (GIO) for the Department of the Interior.  Joe Francica and Adena Schutzberg explore two questions: is there time to find the right person? And, what should be the role of a GIO for such a large agency?

The second  is an interview with Vint Cert on the need for a national technology policy, on the question to centralize or not to centralize, and the possibility of a national Chief Technology Officer.

Podcast: A GIO for DOI

“Last week Secretary Kempthorne announced plans to appoint a Geographic Information Officer, or GIO, for the Department of the Interior. After having a week to ponder the announcement, our editors raise some practical and political questions about the position and who may fill it.”

For podcast, visit: http://www.directionsmag.com/article.php?article_id=2840&trv=1

Source: Joe Francica and Adena Schutzberg, Directions Magazine, August 12, 2008

See also NSGIC commentary on GIO for DOI: http://www.nsgic.org/blog/2008/08/discussion-of-roles-of-gio-and-state.html

 

Towards a National Technology Policy

“A final excerpt from my conversation with Vint Cerf (previous bits here; I’ll get the whole thing online soon, with a shorter version set to appear in the print mag). Here, Cerf discusses the need for a national technology policy. Perhaps unsurprisingly for an architect of the internet, he believes a relatively decentralized approach would work best.

When it comes to national policy, I worry about the idea of trying to centralize everything. The Washington tactic is, when there’s a problem, you appoint a czar, and the czar is responsible. It’s like the War on Drugs, or the War on Poverty. But it never quite works like that, because the economy is highly distributed, and our entire governmental structure is highly distributed, so what you’re looking for, more than centralizing, is to infuse our very distributed environment certain postures and principles that will influence people’s decisions, whether it’s a company CEO or a policy-maker somewhere in the government structure, whether it’s local or state or national.

An example of a posture that I’d be very pleased to see would be increased attention to technical input into policy development. We have lost a great deal of that input over the course of the last eight years.

I’d like to see visible evidence of the reconstitution of bodies providing technical input to policy makers. A small example would be the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee, PITAC, that President Clinton put in place. I’m a little biased because I served on the committee, but what I observed in the course of my time on that committee is that it had a very strong drawing power, convening power to bring together people from various parts of the government who were particularly concerned about information technology and its further development.

And the consequences of the committee deliberations had what I thought was direct effect not only in policy decision in the executive branch, for example in the research area, but also helped influence thinking at the legislative level. The committee went out of its way to brief members of Congress and staff about issues that had come under the purview of that committee. …”

For full text of the article, visit: http://blogs.cioinsight.com/knowitall/content001/towards_a_national_technology_policy.html?kc=CIOQUICKNL09022008MOD

Source: Ed Cone, CIOInsight, on August 28, 2008

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