Tag Archive | GEOINT

New Report on Building a Sustainable National Land Imaging Program

, pre-launch

Landsat and Beyond: Sustaining and Enhancing the Nation’s Land Imaging Program (2013)

Authors

Committee on Implementation of a Sustained Land Imaging Program; Space Studies Board; Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; National Research Council

Description

In 1972 NASA launched the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ETRS), now known as Landsat 1, and on February 11, 2013 launched Landsat 8. Currently the United States has collected 40 continuous years of satellite records of land remote sensing data from satellites similar to these. Even though this data is valuable to improving many different aspects of the country such as agriculture, homeland security, and disaster mitigation; the availability of this data for planning our nation’s future is at risk.

Thus, the Department of the Interior’s (DOI’s) U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) requested that the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committee on Implementation of a Sustained Land Imaging Program review the needs and opportunities necessary for the development of a national space-based operational land imaging capability. The committee was specifically tasked with several objectives including identifying stakeholders and their data needs and providing recommendations to facilitate the transition from NASA’s research-based series of satellites to a sustained USGS land imaging program.

Landsat and Beyond: Sustaining and Enhancing the Nation’s Land Imaging Program is the result of the committee’s investigation. This investigation included meetings with stakeholders such as the DOI, NASA, NOAA, and commercial data providers. The report includes the committee’s recommendations, information about different aspects of the program, and a section dedicated to future opportunities.

Podcast: Future U.S. Workforce for GEOINT

This got geoint? podcast features the recently published report on the “Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence,” released this week by the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Keith C. Clarke of the University of California, Santa Barbara, chair of the Committee on the Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence, joins us to discuss the main findings in the report, including why and how it was conducted, key trends emerging in the industry, current and anticipated expertise gaps, and current training programs.

To listen to the podcast, click Podcast: Future U.S. Workforce for GEOINT. To download a copy of the PDF report, click here.

VA Becomes First State to Pass Drone Regulations

by Jason Koebler, US News & World Report, Feb 5, 2012

The Virginia General Assembly passed a bill Tuesday that will put a two-year moratorium on the use of drones by state and local law enforcement. If signed by Gov. Bob McDonnell, Virginia will become the first state in the U.S. to enact drone regulations. Virginia House Bill 2012 easily passed Monday by a vote of 83-16 and its companion, Senate Bill 1331, passed Tuesday by a vote of 36-2.

For full text of the article, visit Virginia Becomes First State to Pass Drone Regulations – US News and World Report.

As drones get really tiny, new rules proposed for Seattle

by Jake Ellison, SeattlePI.com, February 4, 2012

Weighing in at 16 grams and capable of performing in “harsh environments and windy conditions” a tiny drone unveiled by the British government today shows just how quickly drone technology and use is developing.“The Black Hornet is equipped with a tiny camera which gives troops reliable full-motion video and still images. Soldiers are using it to peer around corners or over walls and other obstacles to identify any hidden dangers and the images are displayed on a handheld terminal,” the British government wrote. And as the Seattle Police Department, like many others in the nation, becomes eager to use drones as part of their police work, Seattle Councilman Bruce Harrell jumped into the fray this afternoon with proposed legislation to rein in drone use.

For full text and copy of the proposed rules visit Drones get really tiny; new rules proposed for Seattle – seattlepi.com.

 

New NRC Report: Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence

Mapping Sciences Committee, National Research Council Preview Report Release, Jan 2013

Authors:
Committee on the Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence; Board on Earth Sciences and Resources; Board on Higher Education and Workforce; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

Abstract: We live in a changing world with multiple and evolving threats to national security, including terrorism, asymmetrical warfare (conflicts between agents with different military powers or tactics), and social unrest. Visually depicting and assessing these threats using imagery and other geographically-referenced information is the mission of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). As the nature of the threat evolves, so do the tools, knowledge, and skills needed to respond. The challenge for NGA is to maintain a workforce that can deal with evolving threats to national security, ongoing scientific and technological advances, and changing skills and expectations of workers.

Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence assesses the supply of expertise in 10 geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) fields, including 5 traditional areas (geodesy and geophysics, photogrammetry, remote sensing, cartographic science, and geographic information systems and geospatial analysis) and 5 emerging areas that could improve geospatial intelligence (GEOINT fusion, crowdsourcing, human geography, visual analytics, and forecasting). The report also identifies gaps in expertise relative to NGA’s needs and suggests ways to ensure an adequate supply of geospatial intelligence expertise over the next 20 years.

To download a PDF copy of the report, visit Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence.

Drone Programs Sparks Budgetary and Privacy Concerns

By Steve Aftergood, Secrecy News, January 31, 2013

The development of unmanned aerial systems (or drones) for military and civilian applications appears to be accelerating faster than the normal policy process can adapt to it.  Aside from festering doubts about the legality, propriety and wisdom of their routine use in targeted killing operations, drone programs are beset by budgetary confusion, and a host of privacy and other legal problems are poised to emerge with the expanded use of drones in domestic airspace. … Meanwhile, “Perhaps the most contentious issue concerning the introduction of drones into U.S. airspace is the threat that this technology will be used to spy on American citizens,” said a new report from the Congressional Research Service.

For full text of the article visit Secrecy News here.

A copy of the CRS report was obtained by Secrecy News.  See Integration of Drones into Domestic Airspace: Selected Legal Issues, January 30, 2013.

See also Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS): Manufacturing Trends, January 30, 2013.

Additional resources on drone policy issues are available from the Electronic Privacy Information Center here.

NGA Deploys Apps for Humanitarian Aid Mission | Spatial Sustain

by Matt Ball, Spatial Sustain, on October 17, 2011

Letitia Long, director of the National Geospatial-Information Agency, demonstrated a number of applications that they have developed to deal with their humanitarian assistance mission. … With the applications, the first responder can zoom into the area of interest and see both before and after imagery. The application can serve the equivalent of 6,000 pages per hour on the mobile device. …

For full text of the article, visit NGA Deploys Apps for Humanitarian Aid Mission | Spatial Sustain.

Crowdsourcing GEOINT

Posted by Anthony Quartararo, Location Leverage,  Sep 06, 2011

There has been a growing discussion in the GEOINT community in recent years about crowdsourced information and what, if anything, should (could) be done with that information. The discussion is both ongoing, evolving and at times, very robust within certain components of the GEOINT community led by NGA. …

For full text of the article, visit Crowdsourcing GEOINT.

The President’s Daily Map

The President’s Daily Map

Source: Christopher Tucker, Huffington Post, November 26, 2010

With the appointment of the new Director of National Intelligence (DNI) James R. Clapper, we have a unique opportunity to apply a new approach to conveying national security information to the Commander in Chief. DNI Clapper is often described as the father of Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT). In an earlier job, DNI Clapper coined the term Geospatial Intelligence, and even renamed and reorganized an intelligence agency around the concept. This was not to establish yet another intelligence “stovepipe”, but to provide an integrative framework for all intelligence and operational national security information. Under his watch, it became common to hear every speaker in the national security community say things like “All Actionable Intelligence Exists in Space and Time” — a truism that has become accepted wisdom by all national security professionals. The map became accepted as the common frame of reference for all national security knowledge.

For full text of the article, click here.

New National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Director Sees GEOINT App Store for Warfighter

New NGA Director Sees #GEOINT App Store for Warfighter

Letitia Long, the newly appointed director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), replacing Admiral Robert Murrett, spoke for the first time at the GEOINT conference today (read her prepared remarks from her keynote). Long has a lengthy resume in the intelligence community (IC) and was recommended by Jim Clapper, the director of national intelligence (DNI) for her new post. She articulated a vision for the agency based on needs she experienced while working as the second in command at the Defense Intelligence Agency.  …   For full text of the article, click here.

Source: Joe Francica, November 2, 2010, Directions Magazine

 

See also recent reports by the Mapping Science Committee, National Research Council of the National Academies:

New Research Directions for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (2010): The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) within the Department of Defense has the primary mission of providing timely, relevant, and accurate imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information–collectively known as geospatial intelligence (GEOINT)–in support of national security. In support of its mission, NGA sponsors research that builds the scientific foundation for geospatial intelligence and that reinforces the academic base, thus training the next generation of NGA analysts while developing new approaches to analytical problems. Historically, NGA has supported research in five core areas: (1) photogrammetry and geomatics, (2) remote sensing and imagery science, (3) geodesy and geophysics, (4) cartographic science, and (5) geographic information systems (GIS) and geospatial analysis. Positioning NGA for the future is the responsibility of the InnoVision Directorate, which analyzes intelligence trends, technological advances, and emerging customer and partner concepts to provide cutting-edge technology and process solutions. At the request of InnoVision, the National Research Council (NRC) held a 3-day workshop to explore the evolution of the five core research areas and to identify emerging disciplines that may improve the quality of geospatial intelligence over the next 15 years. This workshop report offers a potential research agenda that would expand NGA’s capabilities and improve its effectiveness in providing geospatial intelligence.

Priorities for GEOINT Research at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (2006) : The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence(GEOINT) to support national security, both as a national intelligence and a combatsupport agency. In the post-9/11 world, the need for faster and more accurate geospatialintelligence is increasing. GEOINT uses imagery and geospatial data and information toprovide knowledge for planning, decisions, and action. For example, data from satellites,pilotless aircraft and ground sensors are integrated with maps and other intelligence datato provide location information on a potential target. This report defines 12 hard problemsin geospatial science that NGA must resolve in order to evolve their capabilities to meetfuture needs. Many of the hard research problems are related to integration of datacollected from an ever-growing variety of sensors and non-spatial data sources, andanalysis of spatial data collected during a sequence of time (spatio-temporal data). Thereport also suggests promising approaches in geospatial science and related disciplinesfor meeting these challenges. The results of this study are intended to help NGA prioritizegeospatial science research directionsThe National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence(GEOINT) to support national security, both as a national intelligence and a combatsupport agency. In the post-9/11 world, the need for faster and more accurate geospatialintelligence is increasing. GEOINT uses imagery and geospatial data and information toprovide knowledge for planning, decisions, and action. For example, data from satellites,pilotless aircraft and ground sensors are integrated with maps and other intelligence datato provide location information on a potential target. This report defines 12 hard problemsin geospatial science that NGA must resolve in order to evolve their capabilities to meetfuture needs. Many of the hard research problems are related to integration of datacollected from an ever-growing variety of sensors and non-spatial data sources, andanalysis of spatial data collected during a sequence of time (spatio-temporal data). Thereport also suggests promising approaches in geospatial science and related disciplinesfor meeting these challenges. The results of this study are intended to help NGA prioritize geospatial science research directions.

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