Tag Archive | GEO News

Advancing the GEOSS Data Sharing Principles

by Helen Wood, Co-chair, Data Sharing Task Force, GEO News, Issue #15, July 20, 2011

The “GEOSS Data Sharing Action Plan” that was accepted last November by the GEO-VII Plenary and incorporated into the “Beijing Declaration” calls for the creation of the GEOSS Data Collection of Open Resources for Everyone. This emerging GEOSS Data-CORE is a distributed pool of documented datasets with full, open and unrestricted access at no more than the cost of reproduction and distribution. … The GEO Data Sharing Task Force (DSTF) has been tasked to identify the maximum possible datasets that qualify for the Data CORE and whose providers agree to make it available through GEOSS. …

The Task Force conducted a review of legal options for the exchange of data and developed a detailed document addressing legal options for the exchange of data, metadata, and products through the GEOSS Data-CORE.The review noted that the “legal interoperability” of data made available through the GEOSS Data-CORE is essential for the effective sharing of data in GEOSS. Legal interoperability for data means that the legal rights, terms, and conditions of databases provided by two or more sources are compatible and that the data may be combined by any user without compromising the legal rights of any of the data sources used. … The paper identifies an initial set of common-use licenses that meet all of the GEOSS Data-CORE conditions of access and unrestricted re-use of data. …

For full text of the article, visit GEO – Group on Earth Observations | GEO News issue #15 – article.

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Group on Earth Observations Tohoku-oki (Japan) earthquake supersite

GEO’s Tohoku-oki (Japan) earthquake supersite,  GEO News issue #14

Published May 17, 2011, By Falk Amelung, Lead, Task DA-09-01c on Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories Task, University of Miami, Florida, USA

The tragic 11 March 2011 earthquake offshore northern Japan (known as the Tohoku-oki earthquake) and the tsunami that followed left more than 27,000 dead or missing. The International Charter on Space and Major Disasters provided satellite imagery to support the rescue efforts. The GEO Geohazard Supersite went into action to collect Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) multispectral imagery as well as GPS and seismic data to better understand what exactly happened during the earthquake. Space agencies and other contributors to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) supported these and other actions.

via GEO – Group on Earth Observations | GEO News issue #14 – article.

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