Tag Archive | Earthquake

FY 2012 Appropriation for U.S. Geological Survey

Total USGS appropriations:

The FY 2011 appropriation was $1,083.7 million
The FY 2012 Administration request was $1,117.9 million
The FY 2012 appropriation is $1,069.7 million, a decline of $14.0 million or 1.3 percent.

For a breakdown of the appropriations by USGS programs under Surveys, Investigations and Research, visit the AIP FYI blog: FY 2012 Appropriation for U.S. Geological Survey.

Of note, the appropriations report states:

Land Use Change and Land Imaging

“Within Land Use Change, an increase of $11,500,000 is provided to complete funding for Landsat 8 ground operations development. The conferees have not agreed with the proposal to create a separate ‘Land Imaging’ account and have instead maintained funding for all satellite operations within this subactivity. Estimated administrative savings assumed in the proposed new account have been assumed within the Land Use Change account instead.

“The conferees have not agreed to transfer budgetary authority for the launch of Landsat satellites 9 and 10 from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to the Survey. Of the requested $48,000,000 increase for its implementation, the conferees have provided $2,000,000 for program development only. The conferees note that future requests for the project are estimated by the Administration to escalate to over $400,000,000 by fiscal year 2014. There is little doubt that resources will not be available within the Interior Appropriations bill to support these very large increases without decimating all other Survey programs. The conferees note that the launch of Landsat 9 is not scheduled until 2018. This allows time in the year ahead for all interested parties to re-examine how to proceed with future Landsat missions. In the conferees’ view this would be a prudent step, inasmuch as the current budget proposal is based on a report from the Office of Science and Technology Policy issued in 2008, and both technological advances and a vastly different economic environment may point to other, less costly, options for obtaining Landsat data.”

National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program and National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Federal and State Partnerships

“Increases to the request include $998,000 for the National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program to continue funding at the current year enacted level, and $1,500,000 for National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Federal and State Partnerships to partially restore the proposed reduction to that program. Decreases from the request include $500,000 from WaterSMART.”

Natural Hazards and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning

“The conferees have not agreed to proposed reductions in the request and have restored funds to the following programs: $2,000,000 for Earthquake Grants; $1,800,000 for the 2012 Multi-Hazards Initiative; and $1,500,000 for the National Volcano Early Warning System. Decreases from the request include $800,000 from the 2011 Multi-Hazards Initiative, and $3,000,000 from Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning.”


To Catch a Quake

by Ken Pimple, PAIT Project Director, Ethical Guidance for Pervasive and Autonomous IT Blog, August 26, 2011

In this week’s issue [of Science] (v. 333, n. 6046, Aug. 26, 2011), one of the seven featured publications is described in a paragraph entitled “To Catch a Quake” by Nicholas S. Wigginton (p. 1072). … Wigginton’s synopsis of the article describes the Quake-Catcher Network, “a volunteer-based seismic network that employs personal computers as low-cost seismic stations by sending seismic data collected with a small USB accelerometer through the user’s Internet connection.” After Chile’s huge earthquake in 2010, “volunteers rapidly installed nearly 100 accelerometers within weeks in and around the mainshock [sic] area.” …

For summary of and links to Wigginton’s article, visit Ethical Guidance for Pervasive and Autonomous IT.

Liability of Citizen-generated Information for Disaster Management

by Lea Shanley, Communia Blog, Woodrow Wilson Center Science and Technology Innovation Program, September 1, 2011

“We’re less than a week removed from an historic hurricane Irene and a perhaps even rarer East Coast earthquake. So for all of us, the vital role that first responders play in helping us figure out what’s happening and what we need to do in such instances is fresh in our memories. But it’s not just a job for the pros. Now even average citizens, armed with smartphones undreamt of by previous generations, have a role to play during man-made and natural disasters.The worldwide response to the Haitian earthquake and Japanese Tsunami provided vivid proof that these technologies, and the citizens who use them, are playing an increasingly important role in emergency response and recovery. …Citizen-powered situational awareness was on display in dramatic ways. … But new technologies come with strings attached in the form of new legal and policy questions. In preparation for National Preparedness Month, the Woodrow Wilson Center and the National Alliance for Public Safety GIS (NAPSG) Foundation co-hosted a panel discussion on “Liability and Reliability of Crowdsourced and Volunteered Information for Disaster Management” in Washington, D.C. on August 30, 2011. …”

For full text of the article and links to the archived video, click here.

Group on Earth Observations Tohoku-oki (Japan) earthquake supersite

GEO’s Tohoku-oki (Japan) earthquake supersite,  GEO News issue #14

Published May 17, 2011, By Falk Amelung, Lead, Task DA-09-01c on Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories Task, University of Miami, Florida, USA

The tragic 11 March 2011 earthquake offshore northern Japan (known as the Tohoku-oki earthquake) and the tsunami that followed left more than 27,000 dead or missing. The International Charter on Space and Major Disasters provided satellite imagery to support the rescue efforts. The GEO Geohazard Supersite went into action to collect Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) multispectral imagery as well as GPS and seismic data to better understand what exactly happened during the earthquake. Space agencies and other contributors to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) supported these and other actions.

via GEO – Group on Earth Observations | GEO News issue #14 – article.

Crowdsourcing and Collaborative Tools in Virtual Online Disaster Relief Scenarios | Armed with Science

by Dr. Linton Wells II and Khalil Ali, Armed with Science, April 20, 2011

Last month, TIDES (Transformative Innovation for Development and Emergency Support) participated in Exercise 24 Europe (X24EUR), a virtual online disaster relief scenario that leveraged social media, crowdsourcing, and collaborative tools in an innovative cloud computing environment. The event took place from March 29th-March 31st and was co-lead by San Diego State University’s Immersive Visualization Center and the United States European Command, and supported by an array of public/private organizations.

for full text of the article via Crowdsourcing and Collaborative Tools in Virtual Online Disaster Relief Scenarios | Armed with Science.

USGS Requests Public Input on Six Science Strategies

USGS Logo

Image via Wikipedia

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is requesting public input on its six science strategies: Ecosystems; Energy and Minerals; Environmental Health; Global Change; Natural Hazards; and Water. These strategies will used in setting priorities and implementation planning for future research activities at the agency, which was reorganized in 2010.

Please weigh in on the draft and questions here.

Some of the USGS programs that support these science strategies include:

Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)
The Federal Geographic Data Committee is an interagency committee that promotes the coordinated development, use, sharing, and dissemination of geospatial data on a national basis. This nationwide data publishing effort is known as the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI). The NSDI is a physical, organizational, and virtual network designed to enable the development and sharing of this nation’s digital geographic information resources. FGDC activities are administered through the FGDC Secretariat, hosted by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Land Remote Sensing (LRS)
The Land Remote Sensing Program operates the Landsat satellites and provides the Nation’s portal to the largest archive of remotely sensed land data in the world, supplying access to current and historical images. These images serve many purposes from assessing the impact of natural disasters to monitoring global agricultural production.

National Geospatial Program
The National Geospatial Program (NGP) organizes, maintains, and publishes the geospatial baseline of the Nation’s topography, natural landscape, and built environment.  The baseline is The National Map, a set of databases of map data and information from which customers can download data and derived map products and use web-based map services.  Through the Geospatial Liaison Network, the NGP works with cooperators to share the costs of acquiring and maintaining these geospatial data. The National Atlas of the United States of America®, the small-scale component of The National Map, fosters an understanding of broad geographic patterns, trends, and conditions useful for national assessments. The Federal Geographic Data Committee promotes consistent data and metadata standards, system interoperability, and cross-government best business practices for geospatial resources, policies, standards, and technology as part of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure.

Read More…

Op-Ed: Earthquakes and climate change: get the data

by Lou Friedman, The Space Review, Monday, March 21, 2011

The earthquake and tsunami in Japan are the type of events that impact every aspect of life. Catastrophic events are not new on Earth—an argument that climate change deniers like to make to support their position that we should not worry about climate change’s impact. But what is so different now from even a century ago, let alone over the millennia of recorded history, is both the size of our population and its dependence on technology. Both change what were limited local problems into global ones. …

For full text of the article, visit The Space Review: Earthquakes and climate change: get the data.

CALL FOR DATA: Japan Sendai Earthquake Data Portal

Call for Geospatial Data Sharing through the Japan Sendai Earthquake Data Portal
 
In response to the 8.9 magnitude earthquake, which struck offshore Sendai, Japan on Mar 11th 2011, the Center for Geographic Analysis at Harvard University has launched the Japan Sendai Earthquake Data Portal (http://cegrp.cga.harvard.edu/japan/) to support the exchange of geospatial datasets for relief and reconstruction efforts. The portal works best with a Firefox browser.
 
If you have geospatial data about the earthquake impacted regions (such as satellite images, aerial photos, GIS data sets, or other data files that bear locational references) before or after the March 11th earthquake, please consider sharing them through this portal.
 
To contribute datasets to the portal, please email us to obtain the Secure FTP login information: chgis [AT] fas.harvard.edu.
 
You are also welcome to search our portal for related news and available data to download and use. All copyrights are retained by the original producers of the data, and downloads from this portal are for academic, non-commercial, relief and reconstruction efforts only.
 
________________________________________________________
Wendy Guan, Ph.D.                               
Director of GIS Research Services        
Center for Geographic Analysis               
Harvard University     http://gis.harvard.edu                        
 

Haiti Earthquake a Year Later What Has Space Learned

Guest Blog: Haiti Earthquake a Year Later: What Has Space Learned?

Space News, Wed, 12 January, 2011 Submitted by: Ariane Cornell

…After a disaster strikes, current practice ideally has it that the affected country requests aid from the United Nations, and the International Charter Space and Major Disasters is then activated. Space derived data is collected from organizations that are part of the Charter and this information is sent to other organizations who then produce maps and informational reports on the disaster. These organizations then send their information to the disaster responders and the international community. The United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER) tries throughout the process to support the complicated information exchange….

For full text, visit Guest Blog Haiti Earthquake a Year Later What Has Space Learned | SpaceNews.com.

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