Tag Archive | DOE

President’s FY13 Research and Development Budget Released

The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has responsibility, in partnership with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), for advising the President on the Federal Research and Development (R&D) budget and shaping R&D priorities across those Federal agencies that have significant portfolios in science and technology. OSTP also has responsibility—with the help of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), which is administered out of OSTP—for coordinating interagency research initiatives. It is OSTP’s mission to help develop and implement sound science and technology policies and budgets that reflect Administration priorities and make coordinated progress toward important national policy goal.

OSTP is pleased to release the following information on the science, technology, innovation, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education components of the President’s FY 2013 BudgetClick here for webcast of budget briefing and PDF of R&D Budget.

The full President’s FY 2013 budget can be found here.

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White House: An Invitation to Our Latest Open Innovation Ecosystem: Energy.Data.Gov

Posted by Aneesh Chopra, Office of Science and Technology Policy, June 30, 2011

Today we launched Energy.Data.Gov, the latest installment of our growing family of Data.gov communities to deepen our engagement with stakeholders interested in the analytics to measure our Nation’s energy performance. As with our previous open government communities, in health and law, this platform aggregates tools, high-value datasets, and applications to shed light on energy use. It includes 216 free datasets and tools have been gathered from agencies across the Federal government with the goal of empowering all Americans to understand energy issues, including energy consumption within the Federal government.

For full text of the article, visit An Invitation to Our Latest Open Innovation Ecosystem: Energy.Data.Gov | The White House.

Details of the Bipartisan Budget Deal | The White House

Posted by Dan Pfeiffer on April 09, 2011 at 06:44 PM EDT

Last night, President Obama announced that the federal government will remain open for business because Americans from different beliefs came together, put politics aside, and met the expectations of the American people. … This deal cuts spending by $78.5 billion from the President’s FY 2011 Budget request — the largest annual spending cut in our history. …Even though we will no longer double the funding of key research and development agencies, you will still see strong investments in National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Science Foundation and the Office of Science. …

For full text of the article, visit: Details of the Bipartisan Budget Deal | The White House.

U.S. Federal Agency R and D Budget Briefing Schedule FY 2012

AAAS R&D Budget and Policy Program

For information and analysis of the U.S. federal R&D budget, visit: http://www.aaas.org/spp/rd/

Appropriations Progress Chart

AAAS Analysis of R&D Investment in Appropriations
Status of Appropriations Legislation for Fiscal Year 2011

Agency Budget Briefing Schedule FY 2012

OSTP

When: Monday, February 14, 2011, 1:30pm – 2:30pm
Where: AAAS Auditorium, 1200 New York Avenue NW, Washington DC (entrance at 12th and H)
Metro: Metro Center (red, blue, and orange lines)
RSVP: Press should RSVP to Phil Larson
Details: Live webcast will be available at http://www.aaas.org/go/ostp

Read More…

House Republicans Propose New FY 2011 S&T Budgets

FYI#15, API Bulletin of Science Policy News, Richard Jones, February 10, 2011

Next week the House of Representatives may vote on a funding bill that would make significant changes in some S&T agency budgets. Under an initial version of this bill:

* The budget for the Department of Energy’s Office of Science would be reduced by 18.0 percent or $882.3 million from the current level.

* Funding for the National Institute of Standards and Technology would be cut by 14.4 percent or $123.7 million.

* NASA’s budget would remain essentially level, declining 0.6 percent or $103 million.

* The budget for the U.S. Geological Survey would also remain level, declining 0.5 percent or $5.3 million.

* The National Science Foundation’s budget would increase 6.0 percent or $412.9 million.

These changes were in a list of seventy proposed budget recommendations released yesterday by the House Appropriations Committee that were projected to total $74 billion. Additional budget cuts will be made in the bill before it goes to the full House. Chairman Rogers just announced that these cuts will total $100 billion from what President Obama requested. That forthcoming bill – a continuing resolution or CR – would provide funding after an existing short-term bill expires on March 4.

via House Republicans Propose New FY 2011 S&T Budgets.

Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release

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Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release

by Richard Jones, FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News, Number 10, Feb 1, 2011

Yesterday the White House announced that the Administration will send its FY 2012 budget request to Congress on Monday, February 14.  The submission is a week later than usual because the confirmation of the new director of the Office of Management and Budget was delayed. The development of the budget request was undoubtedly made more difficult because Congress has not passed any of the FY 2011 appropriations bills.  Making it even more complicated is the effort being made by House Republicans to reduce FY 2011 spending to FY 2008 levels. President Obama recommended in his State of the Union that non-security spending be frozen for five years except for defense, homeland security, and veterans’ programs.  Importantly, he advocated that government spending increase for science and education. Following the speech, the White House released a document providing additional detail about the FY 2012 budget request, selections of which follow…

For full text of the article, visit Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release.

Data Access and Privacy Issues Related to Smart Grid Technologies

 

DATA ACCESS AND PRIVACY ISSUES RELATED TO SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES

Department of Energy, October 5, 2010

This section summarizes and records DOE‘s impressions of the results of its efforts to collect and analyze diverse perspectives on the current state of data security and consumer access and privacy issues associated with the ongoing development and deployment of ―Smart Grid technologies. In so doing, it provides federal, state and local policymakers, as well as utilities and third-party providers of energy management services, with a concise, broad overview of the current state of ongoing efforts to assess the legal and regulatory implications of the data-security and data-privacy issues that were identified during a public information-gathering process conducted by DOE in the spring and summer of 2010. In this document, DOE attempts to provide a measure of certainty for all Smart Grid participants on issues where there is consensus, as well as highlight the pros and cons of various approaches where debate still exists.
 
DOE stresses the intended audience and the legal and regulatory focus of this report because efforts to encourage the deployment of Smart Grid technologies will depend significantly upon two factors.  First, the success of such efforts depends upon the development of legal and regulatory regimes that respect consumer privacy, promote consumer access to and choice regarding third-party use of their energy data, and secure potentially sensitive data to increase consumer acceptance of Smart Grid.  Second, the success of such efforts also depends upon the development of appropriate technical standards and protocols for promoting privacy, choice, and the secure, interoperable transfer and maintenance of sensitive data. 
 
 This report focuses on the first of these challenges. Federal efforts to investigate the second set of technical issues and promote the development of standards for addressing them are also underway. Those seeking analyses of the technical issues should consult publications like the  Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber Security: Vol. 2, Privacy and the Smart Grid, released by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in August 2010.
For full text of the report, click here.
 
For a related posting on the  Geodata Policy blog, click here.
 
 

 

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