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Today – Conference on Mobile and Location Privacy

NYU/Princeton Conference on Mobile and Location Privacy: A Technology and Policy Dialog

Date: Friday, April 13, 2012
Time: 9:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Location: New York University School of Law, Lipton Hall, 108 West 3rd Street (between Sullivan and MacDougal Streets), New York City. Visit link above for registration.

Co-sponsored by the New York University Information Law Institute and the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy, with generous support from Microsoft.

Conference description: The age of ubiquitous computing is here. People routinely carry smartphones and other devices capable of recording and transmitting immense quantities of personal information and tracking their every move. Privacy has suffered in this new environment, with new reports every week of vulnerabilities and unintended disclosures of private information. On Friday, April 13, 2012, New York University’s Information Law Institute and Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy will host a technology and policy dialogue about the new world of mobile and location privacy. The gathering aims to bring together the policy and technology communities to discuss the substantial privacy issues arising from the growth of mobile and location technologies. The conference will combine a variety of formats, including roundtable discussions on specific topics, a keynote address, and a technology demonstration.

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US senator calls for privacy protections for accessing device location

US senator calls for privacy protections for accessing device location

Geospatial Today, February 7, 2011

The U.S. needs consistent rules for how law enforcement agencies can access the ever-growing collection of location-based data from mobile devices, a U.S. senator said Wednesday. Senator Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, said he will soon introduce a bill that would require law enforcement agencies to get court-ordered warrants to get location-based information from smart phones and other mobile devices, instead of simple subpoenas or other methods without court oversight. “If you asked most Americans, I think they would tell you that surreptitiously turning somebody’s cell phone into a modern-day tracking device … and using it to monitor their movements, 24/7, is a pretty serious intrusion into their privacy, pretty much comparable to searching their house or tapping their phone calls,” Wyden said during a Cato Institute forum.

For full text of the article, visit US senator calls for privacy protections for accessing device location.

Senator proposes mobile-privacy legislation | Privacy Inc. – CNET News

Ron Wyden

Image via Wikipedia

Senator proposes mobile-privacy legislation

by Declan McCullagh, Privacy Inc, January 26, 2011

Federal law needs to be updated to halt the common police practice of tracking the whereabouts of Americans’ mobile devices without a search warrant, a Democratic senator said today. Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, said it was time for Congress to put an end to this privacy-intrusive practice, which the Obama Justice Department has sought to defend in court. Sen. Wyden (right) tells Cato Institute audience that tracking cell phones is as privacy-invasive as searching someone’s home. …

For full text of article via Senator proposes mobile-privacy legislation | Privacy Inc. – CNET News.

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