Tag Archive | Business

Even Hobby Drones Could Be Made Illegal In Texas

by Rebecca Boyle, POPSCI, February 12, 2013

On a hazy day last January, an unmanned aircraft enthusiast piloted his camera-equipped drone in the vicinity of a Dallas meatpacking plant, cruising around 400 feet in the air. To test his equipment, he took some photos of the Trinity River with a point-and-shoot camera mounted to his $75 foam airframe. When he retrieved the remote-controlled aircraft, he noticed something odd in the photos: A crimson stream, which appeared to be blood, leaking into a river tributary. …On Dec. 26, a grand jury handed down several indictments against the owners of the Columbia Packing Company for dumping pig blood into a creek. … Under a new law proposed in the Texas legislature, sponsored by a lawmaker from the Dallas suburbs, this type of activity could soon be criminal. …

Texas House Bill 912–and similar laws under debate right now in Oregon and elsewhere–are driving a burgeoning debate about how to use and control unmanned air systems, from an AR.Drone to a quadcopter. The Federal Aviation Administration is in the process of drafting new rules governing unmanned aircraft in civilian airspace, including military-style aircraft. But in the meantime, plenty of cheap, easy-to-use aircraft are already popular among hobbyists and, increasingly, activists and law enforcement.

For full text of the article Even Hobby Drones Could Be Made Illegal In Texas | Popular Science.

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Responding to Liability: Evaluating and Reducing Tort Liability for Digital Volunteers

Responding to Liability: Evaluating and Reducing Tort Liability for Digital Volunteers

By Edward Robson, Esq.

Major emergencies and crises can overwhelm local resources. In the last several years, self-organized digital volunteers have begun leveraging the power of social media and “crowd-mapping” for collaborative crisis response. Rather than mobilizing a physical response, these digital volunteer groups have responded virtually by creating software applications, monitoring social networks, aggregating data, and creating “crowdsourced” maps to assist both survivors and the formal response community. These virtual responses can subject digital volunteers to tort liability. This report evaluates the precise contours of potential liability for digital volunteers. Published by the Commons Lab of the Science and Technology Innovation Program of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, September 2012.

To download a PDF of the free report, visit the Commons Lab Scribd webpage here.

To read a follow up blog post by the author, visit the Commons Lab Blog “Calling for Backup – Indemnification for Digital Volunteers (November 7, 2012)”

To watch a video of the author discussing liability for digital volunteers, visit the Commons Lab YouTube webpage here.

Crowdsourcing Surveillance

by Bruce Schneier, Schneier on Security, November 9, 2010

Internet Eyes is a U.K. startup designed to crowdsource digital surveillance. People … can log onto the site and view live anonymous feeds from surveillance cameras at retail stores. If they notice someone shoplifting, they can alert the store owner. … Although the system has some nod towards privacy, groups like Privacy International oppose the system for fostering a culture of citizen spies. … This isn’t the first time groups have tried to crowdsource surveillance camera monitoring. Texas’s Virtual Border Patrol tried the same thing: deputizing the general public to monitor the Texas-Mexico border. …

For full text of this article, visit Schneier on Security: Crowdsourcing Surveillance.

The Legal Implications of Social Networking Part Three: Data Security

by David Navetta, InformationLawGroup, January 9, 2012

Summary: In 2011, InfoLawGroup began its “Legal Implications” series for social media by posting Part One (The Basics) and Part Two (Privacy). In this post (Part Three), we explore how security concerns and legal risk arise and interact in the social media environment. There are three main security-related issues that pose potential security-related legal risk. First, to the extent that employees are accessing and using social media sites from company computers (or increasingly from personal computers connected to company networks or storing sensitive company data), malware, phishing and social engineering attacks could result in security breaches and legal liability. Second, spoofing and impersonation attacks on social networks could pose legal risks. In this case, the risk includes fake fan pages or fraudulent social media personas that appear to be legitimately operated. Third, information leakage is a risk in the social media context that could result in an adverse business and legal impact when confidential information is compromised.

For full text of the article, click here. See also Part I: The Basics and Part II: Privacy.

Managing Information Risk and Archiving Social Media | Forbes.com

by Ben Kerschberg, Forbes.com, September 28, 2011

Corporations must have a social media policy. They must be proactive with respect to those messages they allow to be disseminated, and appropriately reactive when the situation demands it, such as potential legal liability or an embarrassing public relations mishap. I had the opportunity to speak to Dean Gonsowski, Symantec e-discovery attorney, who pointed out that corporate social media policies should aim to mitigate a particular type of risk: information risk….

Open Source Licensing: Risk and Opportunity

By Dr. Ignacio Guerrero, Directions Magazine, July 21, 2011

Summary: This two-part article about open source software looks at software licenses, risks related to intellectual property and governance. In part one, author Ignacio Guerrero, IT consultant and former software director at Intergraph and Rolta, examines software licenses and their impact and risk to intellectual property. Part two will look at the elements of open source governance and risk management, and will be published in mid August.

http://www.directionsmag.com/articles/open-source-licensing-risk-and-opportunity-part-one/190454

Mashups, crowdsourcing and their impact on the mapping industry

by Prof. William Cartwright, International Cartographic Association, EE Publishers, July 2011. This article is based on the keynote address given by Prof. William Cartwright at AfricaGEO 2011.

… Maps produced through the process of mash-ups include the amateur map producer. This map producer has access to powerful Web 2.0 delivered software and resources, empowering them with the ability to produce and deliver maps that are both professional and current. Geographical information and base maps can be sourced from conventional providers – for example the Ordnance Survey (OS) of the United Kingdom has developed an API called Openspace which provides free data for non-commercial experimentation (http://openspace.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/openspace) – and from non-conventional sources – for example Nokia Map (http://europe.nokia.com/maps) or from OpenStreetmap (www.openstreetmap.org), the organisation providing free data and maps that are produced by individuals who collaborate to provide a free geospatial resource. However, with Web 2.0 for the provision of maps and geographical information is not without a number of issues. The following section addresses some of these. …

For full text of the article, visit EE Publishers – Mashups, crowdsourcing and their impact on the mapping industry.

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