Tag Archive | Appropriations

Analysis of R & D Investments in FY 2012 Appropriations Bill

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) R&D Budget and Policy Program has released its analysis of research and development investment in FY 2012 Congressional appropriations by Agency, including for the USGS and EPA. For links to the AAAS analysis, summary tables, and more visit AAAS – R&D Budget and Policy Program – Home.

On Friday, December 23, the President signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012, the so-called “megabus” spending bill. … The trillion-dollar compromise package incorporates the remaining nine individual spending bills in the following areas: Defense; Energy and Water; Interior and Environment; Homeland Security; Financial Services; Labor, HHS and Education; State and Foreign Operations; Military Construction and Veterans; and the Legislature. … Based on initial AAAS analysis, total R&D spending for FY2012 stands at $142 billion, approximately $1.8 billion or 1.3% below FY2011 levels. The summary table is posted immediately below, and individual agency tables can be found under the subject headings that follow.

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Status of FY 2012 Appropriations Bills

by Richard Jones, AIP FYI Blog, August 31, 2011

The next few months will be important in determining the funding of federal scientific research in Fiscal Year 2012.  Although FY 2012 starts a month from tomorrow, Congress is unlikely to settle on final budgets until later this year.  Short term funding will be provided through one or bills.  The outlook is more promising for a quicker resolution of the final appropriations than in previous years because Congress and the Administration have settled on an overall cap on FY 2012 discretionary spending

For more information, click here.

Federal Research and Development in the FY 2011 Budget Compromise

On Monday, April 11, the U.S. House of Representatives introduced the bill to fund the federal government for the last half of FY 2011. This bill will be taken up in the House on April 13th and in the Senate on April 14th, and then sent to the President for his signature, hopefully before the midnight deadline on Friday, April 15th. If passed, non-defense funding levels will be reduced by a 0.2 percent across-the-board cut to achieve savings of approximately $1.1 billion. Specific details on programmatic cuts for Federal R&D can be found in the articles blow:

Text of the Legislation:

A summary of the legislation:

 

R&D in the FY 2011 Compromise

by Patrick Clemins, Ph.D., AAAS R&D Budget and Policy Program, April 13, 2011

Congress released their year-long continuing resolution for FY 2011 this morning which contains a total of around $38.5 billion in cuts, the largest collection of spending cuts in history. R&D intensive programs and agencies were spared the worst of the cuts. Basic research programs faired the best, while applied research programs, especially at the Department of Energy did less well, accurately reflecting the current policy debates taking place. Basic research generally has broad, bi-partisan support, but there is discussion as to how much the federal government should be involved in applied research and the role of industry in funding the applied research stage of the innovation pipeline.

For full text of the article and other related resources, visit: http://www.aaas.org/spp/rd/

 

FYI #48: Details of Final FY 2011 Appropriations Bill Emerging

By Richard Jones, American Institute of Physics

Total FY 2011 funding will be $78.5 billion less than that requested by the Obama Administration. … A release from the Senate Appropriations Committee states, “as these cuts must be implemented in just the remaining six months of the fiscal year, their impact will be especially painful in some instances.” The below figures, provided by the House Appropriations Committee, do not include the 0.2 percent across the board cut that was made to all non-defense accounts.  In all instances, reductions from current FY 2010 levels are shown, and the numbers are rounded.  It should also be noted that the House Appropriations statement explains: “This list contains highlighted program cuts. This list is not comprehensive of all program funding levels in the legislation.”

National Science Foundation
Research and Related Activities: Down $43 million
Education and Human Resources: Down $10 million

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Education: Down $38 million
Cross Agency Support: Down $83 million

U.S. Geological Survey: Down $26 million

For full text of the article, visit: http://www.aip.org/fyi/2011/048.html

Two-week measure postpones shutdown

Two-week measure postpones shutdown

By: David Rogers, Politico, February 25, 2011 10:29 AM EST

Threats of a government shutdown next week had all but disappeared by late Friday as Democrats reacted favorably to a Republican plan that would keep agencies operating past Mar. 4 while making a first down payment toward a larger budget deal.The two-week peace is only temporary but gives House and Senate leaders through Mar 18 to try to resolve conservative demands for more than $60 billion in spending cuts, all concentrated in the second half of this fiscal year.

For full article, visit Two-week measure postpones shutdown – POLITICO.com Print View.

Congressional Reaction to Proposed Spending Changes

FYI#15, API Bulletin on Science Policy News, Richard Jones, February 11, 2011

FYI #13 outlined a series of budgetary changes that the House Appropriations Committee had proposed to reduce FY 2011 funding by $74 billion from the amount requested by the Administration. Since that plan was announced, fiscally-conservative Republicans have demanded further cuts in the FY 2011 budget. In response, House Appropriations Committee Chairman Harold Rogers (R-KY) released the below statement yesterday about the Continuing Resolution (CR) that is scheduled to be brought to the House floor next week. This bill will continue funding after a stop gap measure expires on March 4.

“My Committee has been working diligently to go line-by-line in every agency budget to find and cut unnecessary spending to reduce our deficit and help our economy thrive. After meeting with my subcommittee Chairs, we have determined that the CR can and will reach a total of $100 billion in cuts compared to the President’s request immediately — fully meeting the goal outlined in the Republican ‘Pledge to America’ in one fell swoop. Our intent is to make deep but manageable cuts in nearly every area of government, leaving no stone unturned and allowing no agency or program to be held sacred. I have instructed my committee to include these deeper cuts, and we are continuing to work to complete this critical legislation.” …

For full text of the article, visit Congressional Reaction to Proposed Spending Changes.

Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release

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Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release

by Richard Jones, FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News, Number 10, Feb 1, 2011

Yesterday the White House announced that the Administration will send its FY 2012 budget request to Congress on Monday, February 14.  The submission is a week later than usual because the confirmation of the new director of the Office of Management and Budget was delayed. The development of the budget request was undoubtedly made more difficult because Congress has not passed any of the FY 2011 appropriations bills.  Making it even more complicated is the effort being made by House Republicans to reduce FY 2011 spending to FY 2008 levels. President Obama recommended in his State of the Union that non-security spending be frozen for five years except for defense, homeland security, and veterans’ programs.  Importantly, he advocated that government spending increase for science and education. Following the speech, the White House released a document providing additional detail about the FY 2012 budget request, selections of which follow…

For full text of the article, visit Administration Looks Ahead to FY 2012 Budget Release.

Changes in the 112th Congress and Upcoming Appropriations Battles

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The December 2010 issue of the Science and Technology in Congress newsletter is now available online at http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/stc/index.shtml.

The latest science-related news on Capitol Hill from the AAAS Center for Science, Technology and Congress


Changes Coming in the 112th Congress
The 112th Congress will feature a host of new faces, a new Republican majority in the House, and several changes in committee structures. In the House, changes include the abolishment of the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, the creation of new subcommittees, and a plethora of new Chairmen and Ranking Members.
Read the full story here.

FY 2011 Appropriations Battles to Continue Next Year
Congress passed the Continuing Appropriations and Surface Transportation Extensions Act, 2011 (H.R.3082) on December 21. This short-term extension of federal funding at FY 2010 levels through March 4, 2011, sets up a face-off in the new Congress between the newly-elected House Republican majority that is pushing for $100 billion in discretionary cuts and the Democrat-led Senate. Additionally, Congress finalized the extension of several tax cuts, including the R&D tax credit.
Read the full story here.

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