Mashups, crowdsourcing and their impact on the mapping industry

by Prof. William Cartwright, International Cartographic Association, EE Publishers, July 2011. This article is based on the keynote address given by Prof. William Cartwright at AfricaGEO 2011.

… Maps produced through the process of mash-ups include the amateur map producer. This map producer has access to powerful Web 2.0 delivered software and resources, empowering them with the ability to produce and deliver maps that are both professional and current. Geographical information and base maps can be sourced from conventional providers – for example the Ordnance Survey (OS) of the United Kingdom has developed an API called Openspace which provides free data for non-commercial experimentation (http://openspace.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/openspace) – and from non-conventional sources – for example Nokia Map (http://europe.nokia.com/maps) or from OpenStreetmap (www.openstreetmap.org), the organisation providing free data and maps that are produced by individuals who collaborate to provide a free geospatial resource. However, with Web 2.0 for the provision of maps and geographical information is not without a number of issues. The following section addresses some of these. …

For full text of the article, visit EE Publishers – Mashups, crowdsourcing and their impact on the mapping industry.

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