New National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Director Sees GEOINT App Store for Warfighter

New NGA Director Sees #GEOINT App Store for Warfighter

Letitia Long, the newly appointed director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), replacing Admiral Robert Murrett, spoke for the first time at the GEOINT conference today (read her prepared remarks from her keynote). Long has a lengthy resume in the intelligence community (IC) and was recommended by Jim Clapper, the director of national intelligence (DNI) for her new post. She articulated a vision for the agency based on needs she experienced while working as the second in command at the Defense Intelligence Agency.  …   For full text of the article, click here.

Source: Joe Francica, November 2, 2010, Directions Magazine

 

See also recent reports by the Mapping Science Committee, National Research Council of the National Academies:

New Research Directions for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (2010): The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) within the Department of Defense has the primary mission of providing timely, relevant, and accurate imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information–collectively known as geospatial intelligence (GEOINT)–in support of national security. In support of its mission, NGA sponsors research that builds the scientific foundation for geospatial intelligence and that reinforces the academic base, thus training the next generation of NGA analysts while developing new approaches to analytical problems. Historically, NGA has supported research in five core areas: (1) photogrammetry and geomatics, (2) remote sensing and imagery science, (3) geodesy and geophysics, (4) cartographic science, and (5) geographic information systems (GIS) and geospatial analysis. Positioning NGA for the future is the responsibility of the InnoVision Directorate, which analyzes intelligence trends, technological advances, and emerging customer and partner concepts to provide cutting-edge technology and process solutions. At the request of InnoVision, the National Research Council (NRC) held a 3-day workshop to explore the evolution of the five core research areas and to identify emerging disciplines that may improve the quality of geospatial intelligence over the next 15 years. This workshop report offers a potential research agenda that would expand NGA’s capabilities and improve its effectiveness in providing geospatial intelligence.

Priorities for GEOINT Research at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (2006) : The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence(GEOINT) to support national security, both as a national intelligence and a combatsupport agency. In the post-9/11 world, the need for faster and more accurate geospatialintelligence is increasing. GEOINT uses imagery and geospatial data and information toprovide knowledge for planning, decisions, and action. For example, data from satellites,pilotless aircraft and ground sensors are integrated with maps and other intelligence datato provide location information on a potential target. This report defines 12 hard problemsin geospatial science that NGA must resolve in order to evolve their capabilities to meetfuture needs. Many of the hard research problems are related to integration of datacollected from an ever-growing variety of sensors and non-spatial data sources, andanalysis of spatial data collected during a sequence of time (spatio-temporal data). Thereport also suggests promising approaches in geospatial science and related disciplinesfor meeting these challenges. The results of this study are intended to help NGA prioritizegeospatial science research directionsThe National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence(GEOINT) to support national security, both as a national intelligence and a combatsupport agency. In the post-9/11 world, the need for faster and more accurate geospatialintelligence is increasing. GEOINT uses imagery and geospatial data and information toprovide knowledge for planning, decisions, and action. For example, data from satellites,pilotless aircraft and ground sensors are integrated with maps and other intelligence datato provide location information on a potential target. This report defines 12 hard problemsin geospatial science that NGA must resolve in order to evolve their capabilities to meetfuture needs. Many of the hard research problems are related to integration of datacollected from an ever-growing variety of sensors and non-spatial data sources, andanalysis of spatial data collected during a sequence of time (spatio-temporal data). Thereport also suggests promising approaches in geospatial science and related disciplinesfor meeting these challenges. The results of this study are intended to help NGA prioritize geospatial science research directions.

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