Tag Archive | Twitter

Is Your User Content Online Legally Yours?

by David Pogue, Scientific American, March 5, 2013

Instagram, the phone app that lets you take pictures, apply artsy filters and then share them, is huge. …Then, late last year, Instagram did something massively stupid: it changed its terms of use, the document of rules for using the service. The new terms included this gem: “You agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos … without any compensation to you.The backlash was swift and vicious. …People quit Instagram en masse. Lawyers filed a class-action suit….

For full text of this article, please visit Scientific American Is Your User Content Online Legally Yours?: Scientific American.

 

Next generation Total Information Awareness? Software tracks people’s movements and behavior with social media

Software that tracks people on social media created by defence firm, by Ryan Gallagher, The Guardian, Feb 10, 2013

A multinational security firm has secretly developed software [named RIOT, or Rapid Information Overlay Technology] capable of tracking people’s movements and predicting future behaviour by mining data from social networking websites. A video obtained by the Guardian reveals how an “extreme-scale analytics” system created by Raytheon, the world’s fifth largest defence contractor, can gather vast amounts of information about people from websites including Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare. …But the Massachusetts-based company has acknowledged the technology was shared with US government and industry as part of a joint research and development effort, in 2010, to help build a national security system capable of analysing “trillions of entities” from cyberspace. ….

For full text of the article, visit Software that tracks people on social media created by defence firm | World news | The Guardian.

 

The Information Revolution Gets Political

by Joseph S. Nye, Project Syndicate, Jan 9, 2013

“… it would be a mistake to “over-learn” the lessons that the Arab revolutions have taught about information, technology, and power. While the information revolution could, in principle, reduce large states’ power and increase that of small states and non-state actors, politics and power are more complex than such technological determinism implies.

In the middle of the twentieth century, people feared that computers and new means of communications would create the kind of central governmental control dramatized in George Orwell’s 1984. And, indeed, authoritarian governments in China, Saudi Arabia, and elsewhere have used the new technologies to try to control information. Ironically for cyber-utopians, the electronic trails created by social networks like Twitter and Facebook sometimes make the job of the secret police easier.”

For full text of this thought provoking article, please visit The Information Revolution Gets Political by Joseph S. Nye – Project Syndicate.

 

Why Google Isn’t Making Us Stupid…or Smart

by Chad Wellmon, IASC: The Hedgehog Review – Volume 14, No. 1 Spring 2012

‘The history of this mutual constitution of humans and technology has been obscured as of late by the crystallization of two competing narratives about how we experience all of this information. On the one hand, there are those who claim that the digitization efforts of Google, the social-networking power of Facebook, and the era of big data in general are finally realizing that ancient dream of unifying all knowledge. … Unlike other technological innovations, like print, which was limited to the educated elite, the internet is a network of “densely interlinked Web pages, blogs, news articles and Tweets [that] are all visible to anyone and everyone.”4 Our information age is unique not only in its scale, but in its inherently open and democratic arrangement of information. … Digital technologies, claim the most optimistic among us, will deliver a universal knowledge that will make us smarter and ultimately liberate us.5 These utopic claims are related to similar visions about a trans-humanist future in which technology will overcome what were once the historical limits of humanity: physical, intellectual, and psychological. The dream is of a post-human era.6

For the full text of this substantive essay, please visit IASC: The Hedgehog Review – Volume 14, No. 1 Spring 2012 – Why Google Isn’t Making Us Stupid…or Smart – Chad Wellmon.

Tweeting Up a Storm

Commons Lab, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, December 2012

We are inundated daily with stories from the news media about the possible impact social media like Facebook and Twitter will have on our lives. When a storm like Hurricane Sandy hits the East Coast, can this technology actually help to save lives and reduce catastrophic damages? It’s possible. For instance, mobile devices could allow emergency responders, affected communities, and volunteers to rapidly collect and share information as a disaster unfolds. Photos and videos provided through social media could help officials determine where people are located, assess the responses and needs of affected communities—such as water, food, shelter, power and medical care—and alert responders and citizens to changing conditions.

At least that is the promise. When Hurricane Irene barreled across the Eastern seaboard in August 2011, many in the news media cited it as a pivotal moment for social media for disasters. But research we conducted on the use of social media during Irene suggests otherwise. While some emergency management departments launched new social media outreach strategies during the storm, particularly to push information out to the public, many did not change their practices radically and overall use of the technology varied.

This article explores the challenges of effective use of social media for disaster response, read more here.

Social media hoaxes: Could machine learning debunk false Twitter rumors before they spread?

By Will Oremus, Slate Magazine, Dec 14, 2002

When something momentous is unfolding—the Arab Spring, Hurricane Sandy, Friday’s horrific elementary school shooting in Connecticut—Twitter is the world’s fastest, most comprehensive, and least reliable source of breaking news. If you were on the microblogging site Friday afternoon, you were among the first to hear the death toll, watch the devastated reactions, and delve into the personal details of the man the media initially identified as a killer. But there’s also a good chance you were taken in by some of the many falsehoods that were flying, like a letter one of the young victims purportedly wrote to his mother before the shooter entered the classroom. And, of course, all of those social media pages that were making the rounds turned out to belong to innocent people, including the real suspect’s brother.

For full text of the article, visit Social media hoaxes: Could machine learning debunk false Twitter rumors before they spread? – Slate Magazine.

Webcast Event on Crowdsourcing and USAID Development Credit Loans

Usaid logo

Usaid logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Getting by With a Little Help from Our Friends: Crowdsourcing and USAID Development Credit Loans

USAID’s Development Credit Authority utilizes risk-sharing tools to encourage private financial institutions to increase financing for creditworthy but underserved borrowers. Geo-visualization of these loans will allow donors, host governments, and the public to see where USAID has helped enhance the capacity of the private sector to make loans to new businesses and could act as a gauge for trends or signal areas for synergy.Until recently, these data could not be mapped due to problematic and non-standard location data for each loan. Under the policy umbrella of the First Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review, USAID leveraged federal partners, volunteer technical communities, and the power of crowdsourcing to perform intensive data mining and “geo-coding” to understand the geographic distribution of loans and make these data open to the public. Without any additional cost to USAID, data.gov, an online platform for hosting released data, was used for crowdsourcing for the first time.This case study details technical and policy implementation challenges and solutions to help other government entities explore how to leverage the power of “the crowd.”  This form of engagement is opening government and development to the public in an entirely new way. Interested individuals – from transparency advocates to development students to geography fanatics – virtually sit next to USAID staff as true partners working to solve a complex problem.

Speakers:

  • Shadrock Roberts, Senior GIS Analyst, GeoCenter, Office of Science and Technology, United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
  • Stephanie Grosser, Communications Specialist and Presidential Management Fellow, USAID
  • D. Ben Swartley, Agriculture and Environment Officer and GIS Analyst, GeoCenter, Office of Science and Technology, USAID

When:Thursday, June 28, 2012, 12:00 – 1:30 PM

Where:  6th Floor Conference Room
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center
One Woodrow Wilson Plaza
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20004

To RSVP for this event visit: http://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/getting-little-help-our-friends-crowdsourcing-and-usaid-development-credit-loans This meeting is free and open to the public. Allow time for routine security procedures. A photo ID is required for entry.

TechChange will be providing  online engagement  for this event.

  • To watch the live webcast on June 28th and contribute comments and questions for the panelists, visit: http://techchange.org/live-events/
  • To follow and discuss the event on Twitter, use hashtag: #USAIDcrowd

To check out the archived video of the event and event summary, to be posted the following week, visit:
http://www.wilsoncenter.org/event/getting-little-help-our-friends-crowdsourcing-and-usaid-development-credit-loans
http://wilsoncommonslab.org/2012/06/12/event-crowdsourcing-and-usaid-development-credit-loans

For more information, email CommonsLab@wilsoncenter.org.

For directions to the Wilson Center visit http://www.wilsoncenter.org/directions

How The United Nations Is Using Social Media To Spot Crises [Video]

“In this talk from PSFK CONFERENCE NYC, Robert Kirkpatrick talks about how the social media revolution has opened up a significant amount of data that can be analyzed (anonymously) to see signs of change. Kirkpatrick, together with his Global Pulse team at the United Nations, studies sentiment in Twitter feeds, fluctuations in price data and changes in other available information to look for trouble. By using data for good, the United Nations can respond to disaster rapidly — rather than after the fact.”

For full text of this article and a link to the video, visit How The United Nations Is Using Social Media To Spot Crises [Video] – PSFK.

Study questions Twitter’s role in disaster aftermath

by Maria Elena Hurtado, SciDev.net, June 5, 2012

A study has cast doubt on the innovative role that some claim Twitter, the ‘microblogging’ social media tool, can play in generating new information during disasters, although it did find that ‘tweets’ speed up the exchange of existing information. An analysis of tweets sent by people in the United States following the emergency at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant found that most linked to traditional news outlets, such as the New York Times and CNN, for updates. “Since tweeters clearly did not have the expertise [on radiation] nor could they find others on Twitter or in the blogosphere who did, they relied on traditional news media,” study author Andrew Binder, at the department of communication at North Carolina State University, United States, told SciDev.Net. The paper, to be published in the June edition of Environmental Communication, shows changes in the quantity and content of 2,359 tweets from the United States on the nuclear emergency in the two weeks after 11 March 2011, when the disaster was first reported. …

For full text of this news article, visit Study questions Twitter’s role in disaster aftermath – SciDev.Net.

Link to abstract in Environmental Communication
Link to abstract in International Journal of Web Based Communities
Link to paper by Mendoza and colleagues
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Crisis Management 3.0: Social Media and Governance in Times of Transition « Communia

Olubunmi Emenanjo, JD, Commons Lab Blog Communia, Woodrow Wilson Center, February 28, 2012

On Feb. 16, 2012, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars hosted a panel of experts to examine the role that social networks play in preventing and managing crises using “Web 3.0 Resilience Systems.” The discussion centered on the effectiveness of these systems over a Web 2.0 social network.

While Web 2.0 social networks include systems like Facebook and Twitter, Web 3.0 social systems make use of a variety of tools that many say are more effective because they can prevent emergencies from turning into crises. Recent advances in technology allows the collective engagement of millions of sensors in a “cloud”, such as phones, in a real time hyper-network that can allow neighborhoods to take action before a crisis. For example, in a recent explosion of gas lines, loss of life could have been prevented if there had being a way to inform neighborhood residents prior to the explosion. …

via Crisis Management 3.0: Social Media and Governance in Times of Transition « Communia.

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