Tag Archive | Privacy and Security

New York newspaper defends identifying and mapping gun owners

By Katie Glueck, Politico, December 26, 2012

A suburban New York newspaper on Wednesday defended a decision to publish online maps that reveal names and addresses of people with gun licenses in several counties near New York City. … Over the weekend, the White Plains-based Journal News offered interactive maps of Westchester and Rockland counties which gave names and locations of people with pistol permits that the paper had obtained through the state’s Freedom of Information Act. The piece sparked uproar on the right and among some readers this week.

For full text of the article, please visit: New York newspaper defends identifying gun owners – Katie Glueck – POLITICO.com. Click here to see the interactive Map of the gun permits in Westchester county, NY.

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How Technology Is Testing the Fourth Amendment

By Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Digits, Wall Street Journal, September 22, 2011

The Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution protects against “unreasonable searches and seizures” – but what does that mean when it comes to techniques that use technology rather than a physical search that is easy to see? In many ways, it remains unclear. But there a few key issues that courts have been considering lately when it comes to this question. First up: whether the activity being observed by the technology is outside or inside a person’s house. …

For full text of the article, visit: How Technology Is Testing the Fourth Amendment – Digits – WSJ.

Federal Legislation Introduced Regarding Geolocation Information

Daren M. Orzechowski, Allison M. Dodd, Imtiaz Yakub, White & Case, LLC, September 2011

The collection, use and disclosure of geolocation information [(i.e., geographic location)] obtained from customers’ mobile devices has become commonplace among mobile phone providers and third party application developers. … Current federal law allows companies to collect and share this information with third parties without the need to obtain consent from their customers. … In response to these privacy concerns, two federal bills, the Location Privacy Protection Act (“LPPA”) and the Geolocational Privacy and Surveillance Act (“GPS Act”), were recently introduced. If enacted, this legislation would restrict the collection and use by non-governmental entities (and, in the case of the LPPA only, governmental entities including law enforcement agencies) of geolocation information collected by mobile devices without consumer consent. …

For full text of the article, visit White & Case LLP – Publications – Federal Legislation Introduced Regarding Geolocation Information.

FBI’s ‘Stingray’ Cellphone Tracker Stirs a Fight Over Search Warrants, Fourth Amendment – WSJ.com

By JENNIFER VALENTINO-DEVRIES, Wall Street Journal, September 22, 2011

For more than a year, federal authorities pursued a man they called simply “the Hacker.” Only after using a little known cellphone-tracking device—a stingray—were they able to zero in on a California home and make the arrest. Stingrays are designed to locate a mobile phone even when it’s not being used to make a call. The Federal Bureau of Investigation considers the devices to be so critical that it has a policy of deleting the data gathered in their use, mainly to keep suspects in the dark about their capabilities, an FBI official told The Wall Street Journal in response to inquiries.

For full text, visit FBI’s ‘Stingray’ Cellphone Tracker Stirs a Fight Over Search Warrants, Fourth Amendment – WSJ.com.

Another Court Dismisses for Lack of Standing in iPhone Application and Privacy Litigation

by Bret Cohen, HL Chronicle of Data Protection, September 23, 2011

Summary: The trend towards dismissal for lack of standing in privacy cases where no concrete harm is alleged continues.  On a motion to dismiss, a group of consolidated privacy lawsuits against Apple and others in the Northern District of California have been dismissed for lack of standing due to the absence of any allegation of concrete injury.  The court rejected attempts to invent new damage theories and while leave to re-file was granted, the court made clear the high standards of pleading required for standing and also highlighted the other pleading defects in the case that would be disabling were the plaintiffs to try again. For full text of article, visit:

Another Court Dismisses for Lack of Standing a Group of Privacy Cases Where Plaintiffs Failed to Allege Concrete Harm; Other Defects Noted : HL Chronicle of Data Protection.

Court: Some data on government cell phone tracking should be public – CNN.com

By Bill Mears, CNN Supreme Court Producer, September, 2011

Washington (CNN) — Information about how and when the government gathers and uses cell phone location data to track certain criminal suspects should be made available to the public, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. At issue was whether the Justice Department could be forced to release once-sensitive records from past cases, following a lawsuit by the American Civil Liberties Union. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia said the public’s interest outweighed any privacy concerns raised by the government over their warrantless wiretapping.

For full text of article, visit: Court: Some data on government cell phone tracking should be public – CNN.com.

Political Repression 2.0 – NYTimes.com

by Evgeny Morozov, NYT, September 1, 2011

AGENTS of the East German Stasi could only have dreamed of the sophisticated electronic equipment that powered Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s extensive spying apparatus, which the Libyan transitional government uncovered earlier this week. The monitoring of text messages, e-mails and online chats — no communications seemed beyond the reach of the eccentric colonel. What is even more surprising is where Colonel Qaddafi got his spying gear: software and technology companies from France, South Africa and other countries. … Amid the cheerleading over recent events in the Middle East, it’s easy to forget the more repressive uses of technology. …

For full text of the op-ed, visit Political Repression 2.0 – NYTimes.com.

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