Tag Archive | Location Privacy

New Report on Location Data Privacy

Location Data Privacy: Guidelines, Assessment & Recommendations

Location Forum’s Privacy Council’s issued a new report, Location Data Privacy: Guidelines, Assessment & Recommendations.  These guidelines represent an industry-created set of best practices for improving how location data is gathered, used and managed, along with a ‘scorecard’ for quantitatively measuring a company’s privacy risk level. Natasha Léger, President of The Location Forum and editor of LBx Journal, states:These guidelines enable users and companies to understand the value of the information so that they can both take the appropriate measures to safeguard what type of data is disclosed, and determine how it is used and shared”… the “problem with location data today is that it changes as it weaves through various hands—applications, vendors, developers, government, companies, data providers, and individual users” and there is a “diversity of legal protections across countries and states that make developing a consistent privacy policy a moving target.”

You can download the guidelines here (although it’s behind a pay wall).

Read more about this report at Spatial Reserves here and on pages 12 and 13 of the July-August 2013 edition of ApoGeo.

NYU/Princeton Conference on Mobile and Location Privacy: A Technology and Policy Dialog – Ashkan Soltani

April 13, 2013 By kristin thomson

NYU Law School, New York, NY | April 13, 2013

The age of ubiquitous computing is here. People routinely carry smartphones and other devices capable of recording and transmitting immense quantities of personal information and tracking their every move. Privacy has suffered in this new environment, with new reports every week of vulnerabilities and unintended disclosures of private information. On Friday, April 13, 2012, New York University’s Information Law Institute and Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy hosted a technology and policy dialogue about the new world of mobile and location privacy. The gathering aimed to bring together the policy and technology communities to discuss the substantial privacy issues arising from the growth of mobile and location technologies.

For video, visit NYU/Princeton Conference on Mobile and Location Privacy: A Technology and Policy Dialog – Ashkan Soltani.

Chaffetz: ‘Every confidence’ on GPS Act

By Alex Byers, Politico’s Morning Tech, April 12, 2013

CHAFFETZ: ‘EVERY CONFIDENCE’ THAT GPS ACT WILL CLEAR COMMITTEE – Rep. Jason Chaffetz is plenty positive when it comes to whether his bill – which would require law enforcement to score a warrant before obtaining the location of your cellphone – will pass the House Judiciary panel. “…”The last thing the major carriers or hardware companies want to do is have people become afraid of their phones or other mobile devices,” he said. Chaffetz said he didn’t have an exact timeline on next steps, although your MT-er has heard rumblings for a while about a location privacy hearing later this month. Chaffetz added that he’d prefer tackling the issue as a standalone item, instead of conflating the issue with email privacy reform – the opposite of what’s been suggested by Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, chairman of the Judiciary subcommittee that will likely have jurisdiction and a co-sponsor of the GPS Act.

Massachusetts Supreme Court Rules ZIP Codes Are Definitely “Personal Identification Information”

by Erin Aures, Privacy Law Blog, April 1, 2013

In a recent ruling arising from certain certified questions in Tyler v. Michaels Stores, Inc., Civ. No. 11-10920-WGY D. Mass. Jan. 6, 2012, the Massachusetts Supreme Court interpreted “personal identification information” under Mass. Gen. Laws, ch. 93, § 105a Section 105a to include a consumer’s ZIP code and determined that collecting such personal information is a violation of state privacy law for which the consumer can sue see slip opinion. By way of background, the plaintiff, Tyler, alleged she was making a credit card purchase at Michaels an arts and crafts retailer when a cashier asked her for her ZIP code. Tyler provided her ZIP code. Tyler alleged her ZIP code was later used by Michaels to find Tyler’s mailing address and telephone numbers and send her unwanted and unsolicited marketing materials. …

For full text of the analysis, visit Massachusetts Supreme Court Rules ZIP Codes Are Definitely “Personal Identification Information” | Privacy Law Blog.

 

Google Admits Street View Project Violated Privacy

By David Streitfeld, NYT Technology, March 12, 2013

Google on Tuesday acknowledged to state officials that it had violated people’s privacy during its Street View mapping project when it casually scooped up passwords, e-mail and other personal information from unsuspecting computer users. In agreeing to settle a case brought by 38 states involving the project, the search company for the first time is required to aggressively police its own employees on privacy issues and to explicitly tell the public how to fend off privacy violations like this one.

For full text of the article, visit Google Admits Street View Project Violated Privacy – NYTimes.com.

 

Viewpoint: We need ground rules for geo-information

By Christopher Rees and Kevin Madders, BBC News, 28 February 2013

Since the issues are transnational, we’ve proposed the development of an international Geo-information Convention.Its aim is to be technology-neutral, so that it is future-proof enough also to cover new systems like hyper spectral sensors reminiscent of Star Trek and drones with privacy implications reminiscent of 1984.Continue reading the main story “Start Quote What limits should we put on use of its power?”The essential questions are: how do we make geoinformation reliable enough for the particular applications for which it is to be used, and what limits should we put on use of its power?Work on these difficult questions has already begun through the International Bar Association.

For full text of this op-ed, visit BBC News – Viewpoint: We need ground rules for geo-information.

Thank you to Adena Schutzberg (@adenas) for passing this along.

 

Next generation Total Information Awareness? Software tracks people’s movements and behavior with social media

Software that tracks people on social media created by defence firm, by Ryan Gallagher, The Guardian, Feb 10, 2013

A multinational security firm has secretly developed software [named RIOT, or Rapid Information Overlay Technology] capable of tracking people’s movements and predicting future behaviour by mining data from social networking websites. A video obtained by the Guardian reveals how an “extreme-scale analytics” system created by Raytheon, the world’s fifth largest defence contractor, can gather vast amounts of information about people from websites including Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare. …But the Massachusetts-based company has acknowledged the technology was shared with US government and industry as part of a joint research and development effort, in 2010, to help build a national security system capable of analysing “trillions of entities” from cyberspace. ….

For full text of the article, visit Software that tracks people on social media created by defence firm | World news | The Guardian.

 

FTC Releases Recommendations for Mobile Privacy Disclosures

by Richard Santalesa, Information Law Group, February 4, 2013

“… the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) last Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, issued a new 36-page staff report, Mobile Privacy Disclosures: Building Trust Through Transparency, that recaps the FTC’s previous mobile and online privacy related efforts and distills its latest recommendations for clearly and transparently informing users about mobile data practices in the “rapidly expanding mobile marketplace. … Rather than highlighting merely one facet of the mobile world, the Report cements the FTC’s broad interest in improving privacy disclosures across the entire “mobile ecosystem” in recognition of the mushrooming growth, use and capabilities of mobile devices and smartphones. Today it calls upon apps developers, OS providers, carriers, advertisers and mobile device makers.”

For a copy of the FTC Mobile Privacy Disclosures report, click here.

For full text of this review article, visit FTC Releases Recommendations for Mobile Privacy Disclosures | InfoLawGroup.

Drone Programs Sparks Budgetary and Privacy Concerns

By Steve Aftergood, Secrecy News, January 31, 2013

The development of unmanned aerial systems (or drones) for military and civilian applications appears to be accelerating faster than the normal policy process can adapt to it.  Aside from festering doubts about the legality, propriety and wisdom of their routine use in targeted killing operations, drone programs are beset by budgetary confusion, and a host of privacy and other legal problems are poised to emerge with the expanded use of drones in domestic airspace. … Meanwhile, “Perhaps the most contentious issue concerning the introduction of drones into U.S. airspace is the threat that this technology will be used to spy on American citizens,” said a new report from the Congressional Research Service.

For full text of the article visit Secrecy News here.

A copy of the CRS report was obtained by Secrecy News.  See Integration of Drones into Domestic Airspace: Selected Legal Issues, January 30, 2013.

See also Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS): Manufacturing Trends, January 30, 2013.

Additional resources on drone policy issues are available from the Electronic Privacy Information Center here.

Senate Judiciary Committee votes on Location Privacy Act

The Senate Judiciary Committee held an executive business meeting to consider pending nominations and legislation on December 13, 2012, including the Location Privacy Protection Act. The bill, however, was not enacted in the last Congress.

Watch the video here (meeting starts at 21 min into video).

Agenda

I. Bills

S.1223, Location Privacy Protection Act of 2011 (Franken, Blumenthal, Coons, Durbin, Feinstein). Ordered Reported By Voice Vote, Three Senators Recorded As No

  • Substitute Amendment HEN12877 (Franken) Adopted By Unanimous Consent

For more information and links to the amendments listed above, please visit Senate Judiciary Committee.

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